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  1. - - (1995). Recommendations for the Use of Uniform Nomenclature Pertinent to Patients with Severe Alterations in Consciousness. Arch Phys Med Rehabilation 76:205-209.
  2. H. A. Abramson (ed.) (1952). Problems of Consciousness: Transactions of the Third Conference. Josiah Macy Foundation.
  3. M. T. Alkire, R. J. Haier & J. H. Fallon (2000). Toward a Unified Theory of Narcosis: Brain Imaging Evidence for a Thalamocortical Switch as the Neurophysiologic Basis of Anesthetic-Induced Unconsciousness. Consciousness and Cognition 9 (3):370-386.
    A unifying theory of general anesthetic-induced unconsciousness must explain the common mechanism through which various anesthetic agents produce unconsciousness. Functional-brain-imaging data obtained from 11 volunteers during general anesthesia showed specific suppression of regional thalamic and midbrain reticular formation activity across two different commonly used volatile agents. These findings are discussed in relation to findings from sleep neurophysiology and the implications of this work for consciousness research. It is hypothesized that the essential common neurophysiologic mechanism underlying anesthetic-induced unconsciousness is, as with (...)
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  4. Xavier F. Amador & Anthony S. David (eds.) (2004). Insight And Psychosis: Awareness of Illness in Schizophrenia and Related Disorders. Oxford University Press, USA.
    These are integrated and synthesised bythe editors, both acknowledged experts in the field. The scope is truly international and spans theoretical perspectives, clinical practice, and consumer views.
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  5. P. Arhem (1996). Vertical Information Flow in the Brain: On Neuronal Micro Events and Consciousness. Biosystems 38:191-98.
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  6. Peter Århem, Hans Liljenström & B. I. B. Lindahl (2003). Consciousness and Comparative Neuroanatomy: Report on the Agora Workshop in Sigtuna, Sweden, on 21 August, 2002. Journal of Consciousness Studies 10 (3):85-88.
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  7. Giorgio A. Ascoli (2000). The Complex Link Between Neuroanatomy and Consciousness. Complexity 6 (1):20-26.
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  8. F. Ayala & T. Dobzhansky (eds.) (1974). Studies in the Philosophy of Biology. University of California Press.
    Should the philosophy of biology deal with organismic, or with molecular aspects , or with both ? We are, of course, not the first to appreciate the ...
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  9. Bernard J. Baars (2003). How Brain Reveals Mind: Neural Studies Support the Fundamental Role of Conscious Experience. Journal of Consciousness Studies 10 (9-10):100-114.
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  10. Bernard J. Baars (1998). The Neural Basis of Conscious Experience. In A Cognitive Theory of Consciousness. Cambridge University Press.
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  11. Bernard J. Baars (1988). A Cognitive Theory of Consciousness. Cambridge University Press.
    Conscious experience is one of the most difficult and thorny problems in psychological science. Its study has been neglected for many years, either because it was thought to be too difficult, or because the relevant evidence was thought to be poor. Bernard Baars suggests a way to specify empirical constraints on a theory of consciousness by contrasting well-established conscious phenomena - such as stimulus representations known to be attended, perceptual, and informative - with closely comparable unconscious ones - such as (...)
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  12. Talis Bachmann (2004). Inaptitude of the Signal Detection Theory, Useful Vexation From the Microgenetic View, and Inevitability of Neurobiological Signatures in Understanding Perceptual (Un)Awareness. Consciousness and Cognition 13 (1):101-106.
  13. Rajendra Badgaiyan (2012). Nonconscious Perception, Conscious Awareness and Attention. Consciousness and Cognition 21 (1):584-586.
  14. Sergio Bagnato, Cristina Boccagni, Antonino Sant'Angelo, Alexander A. Fingelkurts, Andrew A. Fingelkurts & Giuseppe Galardi (2013). Emerging From an Unresponsive Wakefulness Syndrome: Brain Plasticity has to Cross a Threshold Level. Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews 37 (10):2721-2736.
    Unresponsive wakefulness syndrome (UWS, previously known as vegetative state) occurs after patients survive a severe brain injury. Patients suffering from UWS have lost awareness of themselves and of the external environment and do not retain any trace of their subjective experience. Current data demonstrate that neuronal functions subtending consciousness are not completely reset in UWS; however, they are reduced below the threshold required to experience consciousness. The critical factor that determines whether patients will recover consciousness is the distance of their (...)
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  15. Clive Ballard & Margaret Piggott (2002). Neuroleptics. In Elaine Perry, Heather Ashton & Allan Young (eds.), Neurochemistry of Consciousness: Neurotransmitters in Mind. John Benjamins. 169-179.
  16. Katalin Balog (2007). Comments on Ned Block's Target Article “Consciousness, Accessibility, and the Mesh Between Psychology and Neuroscience”. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (4):499-500.
    Block argues that relevant data in psychology and neuroscience shows that access consciousness is not constitutively necessary for phenomenality. However, a phenomenal state can be access conscious in two radically different ways. Its content can be access conscious, or its phenomenality can be access conscious. I’ll argue that while Block’s thesis is right when it is formulated in terms of the first notion of access consciousness, there is an alternative hypothesis about the relationship between phenomenality and access in terms of (...)
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  17. W. B. Barr (1998). Neurobehavioral Disorders of Awareness and Their Relevance to Schizophrenia. In Xavier F. Amador & Anthony S. David (eds.), Insight and Psychosis: Awareness of Illness in Schizophrenia and Related Disorders. Oxford University Press.
  18. Heinrich Beck (1976). Neuropsychological Servosystems, Consciousness, and the Problem of Embodiment. Behavioral Science 21:139-60.
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  19. Ralf-Peter Behrendt (2004). A Neuroanatomical Model of Passivity Phenomena. Consciousness and Cognition 13 (3):579-609.
  20. Bernard D. Beitman & Jyotsna Nair (2004). Self-Awareness Deficits in Psychiatric Patients: Neurobiology, Assessment, and Treatment. W.W.Norton.
  21. M. Bernhaut, E. Gellhorn & A. T. Rasmussen (1953). Experimental Contributions to the Problem of Consciousness. Journal of Neurophysiology 16:21-35.
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  22. Joseph E. Bogen (2001). An Experimental Disconnection Approach to a Function of Consciousness. International Journal of Neuroscience 111 (3):135-136.
  23. Massimo Bondi & Manuele Bondi (1998). The Role of Synaptic Junctions in the Identification of Human Consciousness. Rivista Di Biologia-Biology Forum 91 (2):329-334.
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  24. Donald Borrett, Sean D. Kelly & Hon Kwan (2000). Phenomenology, Dynamical Neural Networks and Brain Function. Philosophical Psychology 13 (2):213-228.
    Current cognitive science models of perception and action assume that the objects that we move toward and perceive are represented as determinate in our experience of them. A proper phenomenology of perception and action, however, shows that we experience objects indeterminately when we are perceiving them or moving toward them. This indeterminacy, as it relates to simple movement and perception, is captured in the proposed phenomenologically based recurrent network models of brain function. These models provide a possible foundation from which (...)
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  25. Robert Briscoe (2008). Another Look at the Two Visual Systems Hypothesis: The Argument From Illusion Studies. Journal of Consciousness Studies 15 (8):35-62.
    The purpose of this paper is to defend what I call the action-oriented coding theory (ACT) of spatially contentful visual experience. Integral to ACT is the view that conscious visual experience and visually guided action make use of a common subject-relative or 'egocentric' frame of reference. Proponents of the influential two visual systems hypothesis (TVSH), however, have maintained on empirical grounds that this view is false (Milner & Goodale, 1995/2006; Clark, 1999; 2001; Campbell, 2002; Jacob & Jeannerod, 2003; Goodale & (...)
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  26. Richard Brown (2012). Editorial: Standing on the Verge: Lessons and Limits From the Empirical Study of Consciousness. Consciousness and Cognition 21 (2):597-599.
    The papers in this special issue are all descended from papers presented at the second Online Consciousness Conference. I founded the Online Consciousness Conference at Consciousness Online (http://consciousnessonline.wordpress.com) in 2008 mostly because no one else would. Being inspired by the Online Philosophy Conference, I mentioned to several people that it would be great if we had something like that in Consciousness Studies. People I talked to were very enthusiastic but no one seemed like they wanted to initiate the process. I (...)
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  27. Adrian Burgess (2007). On the Contribution of Neurophysiology to Hypnosis Research: Current State and Future Directions. In Graham A. Jamieson (ed.), Hypnosis and Conscious States: The Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective. Oxford University Press. 195-219.
  28. William H. Calvin (1996). The Cerebral Code. MIT Press.
    In "The Cerebral Code," he has solidly embedded his ideas in experimental neurophysiology and neuropharmacology, deriving from his decades in the laboratory.
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  29. William H. Calvin (1990). The Cerebral Symphony: Seashore Reflections on the Structure of Consciousness. Bantam.
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  30. Peter Carruthers & Vincent Picciuto (2011). Should Damage to the Machinery for Social Perception Damage Perception. Cognitive Neuroscience 2 (2):116-17.
    We argue that Graziano and Kastner are mistaken to claim that neglect favors their self-directed social perception account of consciousness. For the latter should not predict that neglect would result from damage to mechanisms of social perception. Neglect is better explained in terms of damage to attentional mechanisms.
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  31. Jonathan Cole (2005). Imagination After Neurological Losses of Movement and Sensation: The Experience of Spinal Cord Injury. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 4 (2):183-195.
    To what extent is imagination dependent on embodied experience? In attempting to answer such questions I consider the experiences of those who have to come to terms with altered neurological function, namely those with spinal cord injury at the neck. These people have each lost all sensation and movement below the neck. How might these new ways of living affect their imagination?
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  32. Jonathan Cole, Natalie Depraz & Shaun Gallagher, Unity and Disunity in Bodily Awareness: Phenomenology and Neuroscience. Association for the Scientific Study of Consciousness Workshop.
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  33. Roberto Cordeschi, Guglielmo Tamburrini & Giuseppe Trautteur (1999). The Notion of Loop in the Study of Consciousness. In Proceedings of the International School of Biocybernetics. World Scientific.
    The notion of loop seems to be ubiquitous in the study of organisms, the human mind and symbolic systems. With the possible exception of quantum-mechanical approaches, the treatments of consciousness we are acquainted with crucially appeal to the concept of loop. The uses of loops in this context fall within two broad classes. In the first one, loops are used to express the control of the organism’s interaction with the environment; in the second one, they are used to express self-reference. (...)
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  34. Diego J. Cosmelli, Jean-Philippe Lachaux & Evan Thompson (2007). Neurodynamics of Consciousness. In P.D. Zelazo, Morris Moscovitch & Evan Thompson (eds.), Cambridge Handbook of Consciousness. Cambridge.
    cal basis of consciousness. We continue by discussing the relation between spatiotem- One of the outstanding problems in the cog- poral patterns of brain activity and con- nitive sciences is to understand how ongo- sciousness, with particular attention to pro- ing conscious experience is related to the cesses in the gamma frequency band. We workings of the brain and nervous system. then adopt a critical perspective and high-.
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  35. Alan Cowey (1997). Current Awareness: Spotlight on Consciousness. Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology 39:54-62.
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  36. Alan Cowey & Petra Stoerig (1991). The Neurobiology of Blindsight. Trends in Neurosciences 14:140-5.
  37. O. D. Creutzfeld (1979). Brain and Mind. (Ciba Foundation Symposium 69).
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  38. O. D. Creutzfeld (1979). Neurophysiological Mechanisms and Consciousness. In Brain and Mind. (Ciba Foundation Symposium 69).
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  39. Francis Crick (1994). The Astonishing Hypothesis: The Scientific Search for the Soul. Scribners.
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  40. Francis Crick & Christof Koch (1992). The Problem of Consciousness. Scientific American 267 (3):152-60.
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  41. Richard Cytowic (1995). Synesthesia: Phenomenology and Neuropsychology. Psyche 2 (10).
  42. Richard J. Davidson, Gary E. Schwartz & D. H. Shapiro (eds.) (1983). Consciousness and Self-Regulation. Plenum.
  43. Stanislas Dehaene (ed.) (2002). The Cognitive Neuroscience of Consciousness. MIT Press.
    This book investigates the philosophical, empirical, and theoretical bases on which a cognitive neuroscience of consciousness can be founded.
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  44. Stanislas Dehaene, Michel Kerszberg & Jean-Pierre Changeux (2001). A Neuronal Model of a Global Workspace in Effortful Cognitive Tasks. Pnas 95 (24):14529-14534.
  45. J. Delacour (1997). Neurobiology of Consciousness: An Overview. Behavioural Brain Research 85:127-141.
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  46. J. Delacour (1995). An Introduction to the Biology of Consciousness. Neuropsychologia 33:1061-1074.
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  47. J. F. Delafresnaye (ed.) (1954). Brain Mechanisms and Consciousness. Blackwell.
  48. Natalie Depraz (2008). The Rainbow of Emotions: At the Crossroads of Neurobiology and Phenomenology. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 41 (2):237-259.
    This contribution seeks to explicitly articulate two directions of a continuous phenomenal field: (1) the genesis of intersubjectivity in its bodily basis (both organic and phylogenetic); and (2) the re-investment of the organic basis (both bodily and cellular) as a self-transcendence. We hope to recast the debate about the explanatory gap by suggesting a new way to approach the mind-body and Leib/Körper problems: with a heart-centered model instead of a brain-centered model. By asking how the physiological dynamics of heart and (...)
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  49. Natalie Depraz (2002). Confronting Death Before Death: Between Imminence and Unpredictability. Francisco Varela's Neurophenomenology of Radical Embodiment. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 1 (2):83-95.
  50. J. E. Tomberg Desmedt (1995). Consciousness. Electroencephalography and Clinical Neurophysiology, Supplement 44:227-34.
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