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  1. D. Aerts, J. Broekaert & Liane Gabora (2002). Intrinsic Contextuality as the Crux of Consciousness. In Kunio Yasue, Marj Jibu & Tarcisio Della Senta (eds.), No Matter, Never Mind: Proceedings of Toward a Science of Consciousness: Fundamental Approaches (Tokyo '99). John Benjamins.
    A stream of conscious experience is extremely contextual; it is impacted by sensory stimuli, drives and emotions, and the web of associations that link, directly or indirectly, the subject of experience to other elements of the individual's worldview. The contextuality of one's conscious experience both enhances and constrains the contextuality of one's behavior. Since we cannot know first-hand the conscious experience of another, it is by way of behavioral contextuality that we make judgements about whether or not, and to what (...)
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  2. Harald Atmanspacher (1994). Complexity and Meaning as a Bridge Across the Cartesian Cut. Journal of Consciousness Studies 1 (2):168-181.
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  3. Harald Atmanspacher & Hans Primas (2006). Pauli's Ideas on Mind and Matter in the Context of Contemporary of Science. Journal of Consciousness Studies 13 (3):5-50.
    Wolfgang Pauli (1900-1958) was one of the greatest physicists of the past century. He played a leading role in the development of modern physics and was known for his ruthless intellectual integrity. Pauli first became famed through the publication of his encyclopaedia article on the theory of relativity (Pauli, 1921) when he was still a student of Sommerfeld's. Einstein much admired this article, which remained a classic.
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  4. Bernard J. Baars (1995). Can Physics Provide a Theory of Consciousness? Psyche 2 (8).
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  5. Wolfgang Baer (2007). The Physical Condition for Consciousness: A Comment on R. Shaw and J. Kinsella-Shaw. Journal of Consciousness Studies 14 (8):93-104.
    If the universe is a machine, consciousness is not possible. If the universe is more than a machine, then physics is incomplete. Since we are both part of the universe and conscious, physics must be incomplete and the understanding required to construct conscious mechanisms must be sought through the advancement of physics not the continued application of inadequate concepts. In this paper I will show that an impediment to this advancement is the confusion arising through the use of terms such (...)
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  6. D. Bilodeau (1996). Physics, Machines, and the Hard Problem. Journal of Consciousness Studies 3 (5-6):386-401.
  7. David J. Bohm (1986). A New Theory of the Relationship of Mind and Matter. Journal of the American Society for Psychical Research 80 (2 & 3):113-35.
    The relationship of mind and matter is approached in a new way in this article. This approach is based on the causal interpretation of the quantum theory, in which an electron, for example, is regarded as an inseparable union of a particle and afield. This field has, however, some new properties that can be seen to be the main sources of the differences between the quantum theory and the classical (Newtonian) theory. These new properties suggest that the field may be (...)
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  8. Jean E. Burns (2012). The Action of the Mind. In I. Fredriksson (ed.), Aspects of Consciousness. McFarland. 204.
    It is assumed that mental action, such as free will, exists, and an exploration is made of its relationship to the brain, physical laws, and evolutionary selection. If the assumption is made that all content of conscious experience is encoded in the brain, it follows that free will must act as process only. This result is consistent with the experimental results of Libet and others that if free will exists, it must act by making a selection between alternatives provided by (...)
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  9. Jean E. Burns (2012). The Action of Consciousness and the Uncertainty Principle. Journal of Nonlocality 1 (1).
    The term action of consciousness is used to refer to an influence, such as psychokinesis or free will, that produces an effect on matter that is correlated to mental intention, but not completely determined by physical conditions. Such an action could not conserve energy. But in that case, one wonders why, when highly accurate measurements are done, occasions of non-conserved energy (generated perhaps by unconscious PK) are not detected. A possible explanation is that actions of consciousness take place within the (...)
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  10. Jean E. Burns (2010). What Does the Mind Do That the Brain Does Not? In R. L. Amoroso (ed.), The Complementarity of Mind and Body: Fulfilling the Dream of Descartes, Einstein and Eccles. Nova Science.
    Two forms of independent action by consciousness have been proposed by various researchers – free will and holistic processing. (Holistic processing contributes to the formation of behavior through the holistic use of brain programs and encoding.) The well-known experiment of Libet et al. (1983) implies that if free will exists, its action must consist of making a selection among alternatives presented by the brain. As discussed herein, this result implies that any physical changes mind can produce in the brain are (...)
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  11. Jean E. Burns (2006). The Arrow of Time and the Action of the Mind at the Molecular Level. In Daniel P. Sheehan (ed.), Frontiers of Time. American Inst. Of Physics.
    A new event is defined as an intervention in the time reversible dynamical trajectories of particles in a system. New events are then assumed to be quantum fluctuations in the spatial and momentum coordinates, and mental action is assumed to work by ordering such fluctuations. It is shown that when the cumulative values of such fluctuations in a mean free path of a molecule are magnified by molecular interaction at the end of that path, the momentum of a molecule can (...)
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  12. Jean E. Burns (1999). Volition and Physical Laws. Journal of Consciousness Studies 6 (10):27-47.
  13. Jean E. Burns (1996). The Possibility of Empirical Test of Hypotheses About Consciousness. In S. R. Hameroff, A. W. Kaszniak & A. C. Scott (eds.), Towards a Science of Consciousness. MIT Press. 739--742.
    The possibility of empirical test is discussed with respect to three issues: (1) What is the ontological relationship between consciousness and the brain/physical world? (2) What physical characteristics are associated with the mind/brain interface? (3) Can consciousness act on the brain independently of any brain process?
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  14. Jean E. Burns (1991). Contemporary Models of Consciousness, Part II. Journal of Mind and Behavior 12:407-420.
    Recent models of consciousness are reviewed which explore the relationship of consciousness to physical laws; many of these also explore the relationship of consciousness to biological findings. Issues investigated by these models are discussed, with the issues framed in a general way in order to provide a comparison between the models. In Part II the issues discussed include: (1) Does all of the information content of consciousness correspond to neural coding in the brain? (2) Does consciousness follow the brain passively, (...)
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  15. Jean E. Burns (1990). Contemporary Models of Consciousness, Part I. Journal of Mind and Behavior 11:153-171.
    Recent models of consciousness are reviewed which explore the relationship of consciousness to physical laws; many of these also explore the relationship of consciousness to biological findings. Issues investigated by these models are discussed, with the issues framed in a general way in order to provide a comparison between the models. In Part I the issues discussed are: (1) What is the causal relationship between consciousness and the physical world (physicalism, dualism, etc.)? and (2) What physical characteristics are associated with (...)
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  16. Christopher J. S. Clarke (2001). Consciousness and Non-Hierarchical Physics. In P. Loockvane (ed.), The Physical Nature of Consciousness. John Benjamins. 29--191.
    An example is presented of a model of consciousness based on a description of the world which integrates the material and psychological aspects from the start. An indication is given of work under way to test the model.
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  17. Christopher J. S. Clarke (1995). The Nonlocality of Mind. Journal of Consciousness Studies 2 (3):231-40.
    The dominance in normal awareness of visual percepts, which are linked to space, obscures the fact that most thoughts are non-spatial. It is argued that the mind is intrinsically non-spatial, though in perception can become compresent with spatial things derived from outside the mind. The assumption that the brain is entirely spatial is also challenged, on the grounds that there is a perfectly good place for the non-spatial in physics. A quantum logic approach to physics, which takes non-locality as its (...)
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  18. James T. Culbertson (1982). Consciousness: Natural and Artificial. Libra.
  19. F. de Silva (1996). Consciousness and Special Relativity. IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Magazine 15:21-26.
  20. M. Dugic, Milan M. Cirkovic & D. Rakovic (2002). On a Possible Physical Metatheory of Consciousness. Open Systems and Information Dynamics 9:153-166.
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  21. Michael G. Dyer (1994). Quantum Physics and Consciousness, Creativity, Computers: A Commentary on Goswami's Quantum-Based Theory of Consciousness and Free Will. Journal of Mind and Behavior 15 (3):265-90.
  22. Avshalom C. Elitzur (1996). Time and Consciousness: The Uneasy Bearing of Relativity on the Mind-Body Problem. In Stuart R. Hameroff, Alfred W. Kaszniak & A. C. Scott (eds.), Toward a Science of Consciousness. MIT Press.
  23. Michael Esfeld (1999). Quantum Holism and the Philosophy of Mind. Journal of Consciousness Studies 6 (1):23-38.
    This paper attempts to build a bridge between the interpretation of quantum theory and the philosophy of mind. In contrast to other such attempts, the bridge which this paper suggests does not consist in extending features of quantum theory to the philosophy of mind. The argument of this paper is that the discussion about a revision of the Cartesian tradition in current philosophy of mind is relevant to the interpretation of quantum theory: taking this discussion into account sharpens up the (...)
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  24. Gordon G. Globus, Karl H. Pribram & Giuseppe Vitiello (eds.) (2004). Brain and Being. John Benjamins.
  25. David Gordon (1984). Special Relativity and the Location of Mental Events. Analysis 44 (June):126-127.
  26. Amit Goswami, The Hard Questions: View From a Science of Consciousness.
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  27. Amit Goswami (2001). Physics Within Non-Dual Consciousness. Philosophy East and West 51 (4):535-544.
    It is shown that if quantum physics is interpreted according to the philosophy of monistic idealism--that consciousness is the ground of all being--then some of the important dualisms of philosophy can be integrated.
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  28. N. Herbert (1993). Elemental Mind: Human Consciousness and the New Physics. Dutton.
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  29. M. W. Ho (1997). Quantum Coherence and Conscious Experience. Kybernetes 26:265-76.
  30. David Hodgson (1996). Nonlocality, Local Indeterminism, and Consciousness. Ratio 9 (1):1-22.
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  31. David Hodgson (1991). The Mind Matters: Consciousness and Choice in a Quantum World. Oxford Unversity Press.
    In this book, Hodgson presents a clear and compelling case against today's orthodox mechanistic view of the brain-mind, and in favor of the view that "the mind matters." In the course of the argument he ranges over such topics as consciousness, informal reasoning, computers, evolution, and quantum indeterminancy and non-locality. Although written from a philosophical viewpoint, the book has important implications for the sciences concerned with the brain-mind problem. At the same time, it is largely non-technical, and thus accessible to (...)
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  32. Marj Jibu (2002). The Mind-Body and the Light-Matter. In Kunio Yasue, Marj Jibu & Tarcisio Della Senta (eds.), No Matter, Never Mind. John Benjamins. 33--13.
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  33. Mostyn W. Jones (2013). Electromagnetic-Field Theories of Mind. Journal of Consciousness Studies 20 (11-12).
    Neuroscience investigates how neuronal processing circuits work, but it has problems explaining experiences this way. For example, it hasn’t explained how colour and shape circuits bind together in visual processing, nor why colours and other qualia are experienced so differently yet processed by circuits so similarly, nor how to get from processing circuits to pictorial images spread across inner space. Some theorists turn from these circuits to their electromagnetic fields to deal with such difficulties concerning the mind’s qualia, unity, privacy, (...)
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  34. Brian Josephson (2002). The Importance of Experience: Where for the Future? In Kunio Yasue, Marj Jibu & Tarcisio Della Senta (eds.), No Matter, Never Mind. John Benjamins. 33--109.
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  35. Goro Kato & D. Struppa (2002). Category Theory and Consciousness. In Kunio Yasue, Marj Jibu & Tarcisio Della Senta (eds.), No Matter, Never Mind. John Benjamins.
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  36. Ervin Laszlo (2006). Quantum and Consciousness: In Search of a New Paradigm. Zygon 41 (3):533-541.
  37. Michael Lipkin (2005). The Field Concept in Current Models of Consciousness: A Tool for Solving the Hard Problem? Mind and Matter 3 (2):29-85.
  38. Michael Lockwood (2003). Consciousness and the Quantum World: Putting Qualia on the Map. In Quentin Smith & Aleksandar Jokic (eds.), Consciousness: New Philosophical Perspectives. Oxford University Press. 447.
  39. Michael Lockwood (1984). Reply to David Gordon's Special Relativity and the Location of Mental Events. Analysis 44 (June):127-128.
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  40. Barry M. Loewer (2003). Consciousness and Quantum Theory: Strange Bedfellows. In Quentin Smith & Aleksandar Jokic (eds.), Consciousness: New Philosophical Perspectives. Oxford University Press.
    When I look at the scale of the apparatus I know what it reads. Those absurdly delicate, hopelessly inaccessible, global correlations obviously vanish when they connect up with me. Whether this is because consciousness is beyond the range of phenomena that quantum mechanics is capable of dealing with, or because it has infinitely many degrees of freedom or special super selection rules of its own, I would not presume to guess. But this is a puzzle about consciousness that should not (...)
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  41. P. Van Loocke (ed.) (2001). The Physical Nature of Consciousness. John Benjamins.
  42. Philip Loockvane (2001). The Philosophy of Consciousness, 'Deep' Teleology and Objective Selection. In Philip Van Loocke (ed.), The Physical Nature of Consciousness. Advances in Consciousness Research, Vol 29. 293-311.
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  43. Copthorne Macdonald (1994). An Energy/ Awareness/ Information Interpretation of Physical and Mental Reality. Zygon 29 (2):135-151.
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  44. Gunter Mahler (2004). The Partitioned Quantum Universe: Entanglement and the Emergence of Functionality. Mind and Matter 2 (2):67-89.
    Given that the world as we perceive it appears to be predominantly classical, how can we stabilize quantum effects? Given the fundamental description of our world is quantum mechanical, how do classical phenomena emerge? Answers can be found from the analysis of the scaling properties of modular quantum systems with respect to a given level of description. It is argued that, depending on design, such partitioned quantum systems may support various functions. Despite their local appearance these functions are emergent properties (...)
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  45. J. McFadden (2002). Synchronous Firing and its Influence on the Brain's Electromagnetic Field: Evidence for an Electromagnetic Field Theory of Consciousness. Journal of Consciousness Studies 9 (4):23-50.
  46. J. McFadden (2002). The Conscious Electromagnetic Information (Cemi) Field Theory: The Hard Problem Made Easy? Journal of Consciousness Studies 9 (8):45-60.
  47. J. McFadden (2002). The Conscious Electromagnetic Field: The Hard Problem Made Easy? Journal of Consciousness Studies.
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  48. Hans Moravec (1995). Roger Penrose's Gravitonic Brains: A Review of Shadows of the Mind by Roger Penrose. [REVIEW] Psyche 2 (1).
    Summarizing a surrounding 200 pages, pages 179 to 190 of Shadows of the Mind contain a future dialog between a human identified as "Albert Imperator" and an advanced robot, the "Mathematically Justified Cybersystem", allegedly Albert's creation. The two have been discussing a Gödel sentence for an algorithm by which a robot society named SMIRC certifies mathematical proofs. The sentence, referred to in mathematical notation as Omega(Q*), is to be precisely constructed from on a definition of SMIRC's algorithm. It can be (...)
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  49. R. Nair (1991). Quantum Physics and the Philosophy of Mind: An Essay Review. Journal of Scientific and Industrial Research 50.
  50. C. M. H. Nunn (1996). On the Geometry of Consciousness. Journal of Consciousness Studies 3 (5-6):477-83.
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