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  1. Hilary Barth (2008). Do Mental Magnitudes Form Part of the Foundation for Natural Number Concepts? Don't Count Them Out Yet. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (6):644-645.
    The current consensus among most researchers is that natural number is not built solely upon a foundation of mental magnitudes. On their way to the conclusion that magnitudes do not form any part of that foundation, Rips et al. pass rather quickly by theories suggesting that mental magnitudes might play some role. These theories deserve a closer look.
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  2. Mark Bevir & Karsten Stueber (2011). Empathy, Rationality, and Explanation. Journal of the Philosophy of History 5 (2):147-162.
    This paper describes the historical background to contemporary discussions of empathy and rationality. It looks at the philosophy of mind and its implications for action explanation and the philosophy of history. In the nineteenth century, the concept of empathy became prominent within philosophical aesthetics, from where it was extended to describe the way we grasp other minds. This idea of empathy as a way of understanding others echoed through later accounts of historical understanding as involving re-enactment, noticeably that of R. (...)
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  3. Douglas C. Broadfield (2010). Grandparental Investment and the Epiphenomenon of Menopause in Recent Human History. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (1):19-20.
    The effects of grandparental investment in relatives are apparent in human groups, suggesting that a postreproductive period in humans is selective. Although investment of relatives in kin produces obvious benefits for kin groups, selection for a postreproductive period in humans is not supported by evidence from chimpanzees. Instead, grandparental investment is likely a recent phenomenon of longevity, rather than an evolved feature.
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  4. Cameron Buckner, Adam Shriver, Stephen Crowley & Colin Allen (2009). How “Weak” Mindreaders Inherited the Earth. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (2):140-141.
    Carruthers argues that an integrated faculty of metarepresentation evolved for mindreading and was later exapted for metacognition. A more consistent application of his approach would regard metarepresentation in mindreading with the same skeptical rigor, concluding that the “faculty” may have been entirely exapted. Given this result, the usefulness of Carruthers’ line-drawing exercise is called into question.
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  5. Giovanna Colombetti (2009). Reply to Barrett, Gendron & Huang. Philosophical Psychology 22 (4):439 – 442.
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  6. Matteo Colombo (2014). Explaining Social Norm Compliance. A Plea for Neural Representations. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 13 (2):217-238.
    How should we understand the claim that people comply with social norms because they possess the right kinds of beliefs and preferences? I answer this question by considering two approaches to what it is to believe (and prefer), namely: representationalism and dispositionalism. I argue for a variety of representationalism, viz. neural representationalism. Neural representationalism is the conjunction of two claims. First, what it is essential to have beliefs and preferences is to have certain neural representations. Second, neural representations are often (...)
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  7. Kevin Connolly, John Donaldson, David M. Gray, Emily McWilliams, Sofia Ortiz-Hinojosa & David Suarez, Report on the Network for Sensory Research Toronto Workshop on Perceptual Learning.
    This report highlights and explores five questions which arose from the workshop on perceptual learning and perceptual recognition at the University of Toronto, Mississauga on May 10th and 11th, 2012: 1. How should we demarcate perceptual learning from perceptual development? 2. What are the origins of multimodal associations? 3. Does our representation of time provide an amodal framework for multi-sensory integration? 4. What counts as cognitive penetration? 5. How can philosophers and psychologists most fruitfully collaborate?
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  8. Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi & Isabella Selega Csikszentmihalyi (eds.) (1988). Optimal Experience: Psychological Studies of Flow in Consciousness. Cambridge University Press.
    What constitutes enjoyment of life? Optimal Experience: Psychological Studies of Flow in Consciousness offers a comprehensive survey of theoretical and empirical investigations of the "flow" experience, a desirable or optimal state of consciousness that enhances a person's psychic state. "Flow" can be said to occur when people are able to meet the challenges of their environment with appropriate skills, and accordingly feel a sense of well-being, a sense of mastery, and a heightened sense of self-esteem. The authors show the diverse (...)
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  9. David Danks & Frederick Eberhardt (2009). Explaining Norms and Norms Explained. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (1):86-87.
    Oaksford & Chater (O&C) aim to provide teleological explanations of behavior by giving an appropriate normative standard: Bayesian inference. We argue that there is no uncontroversial independent justification for the normativity of Bayesian inference, and that O&C fail to satisfy a necessary condition for teleological explanations: demonstration that the normative prescription played a causal role in the behavior's existence.
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  10. Felipe de Brigard & J. Prinz (2010). Attention and Consciousness. Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews 1 (1):51-59.
    For the past three decades there has been a substantial amount of scientific evidence supporting the view that attention is necessary and sufficient for perceptual representations to become conscious (i.e., for there to be something that it is like to experience a representational perceptual state). This view, however, has been recently questioned on the basis of some alleged counterevidence. In this paper we survey some of the most important recent findings. In doing so, we have two primary goals. The first (...)
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  11. José‐Luis Díaz (1997). A Patterned Process Approach to Brain, Consciousness, and Behavior. Philosophical Psychology 10 (2):179-195.
    Abstract The architecture of brain, consciousness, and behavioral processes is shown to be formally similar in that all three may be conceived and depicted as Petri net patterned processes structured by a series of elements occurring or becoming active in stochastic succession, in parallel, with different rhythms of temporal iteration, and with a distinct qualitative manifestation in the spatiotemporal domain. A patterned process theory is derived from the isomorphic features of the models and contrasted with connectionist, dynamic system notions. This (...)
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  12. James A. Dixon, John G. Holden, Daniel Mirman & Damian G. Stephen (2012). Multifractal Dynamics in the Emergence of Cognitive Structure. Topics in Cognitive Science 4 (1):51-62.
    The complex-systems approach to cognitive science seeks to move beyond the formalism of information exchange and to situate cognition within the broader formalism of energy flow. Changes in cognitive performance exhibit a fractal (i.e., power-law) relationship between size and time scale. These fractal fluctuations reflect the flow of energy at all scales governing cognition. Information transfer, as traditionally understood in the cognitive sciences, may be a subset of this multiscale energy flow. The cognitive system exhibits not just a single power-law (...)
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  13. Donelson E. Dulany (2002). Mentalistic Metatheory and Strategies. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (3):337-338.
    Mentalism (Dulany 1991; 1997) provides a metatheoretical alternative to the dominant cognitive view. This commentary briefly outlines its main propositions and what I see as strategies for its use and support at this stage. These propositions represent conscious states as the sole carriers of symbolic representations, and mental episodes as consisting exclusively of conscious states interrelated by nonconscious operations.
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  14. Werner Ehm (2010). Broad Views of the Philosophy of Nature: Riemann, Herbart, and the “Matter of the Mind”. Philosophical Psychology 23 (2):141 – 162.
    This paper deals with an attempt of the mathematician Riemann to develop an outstandingly broad view of the philosophy of nature encompassing basic phenomena of both the material and the mental world. Riemann's draft is traced in its main aspects, and is accompanied by a comparison with certain chapters in the philosophical writings of Herbart that were particularly relevant to Riemann's conception of mathematics and science on the whole. This applies, in particluar, to the epistemological background and to Herbart's theory (...)
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  15. Jonathan St B. T. Evans (2009). Does Rational Analysis Stand Up to Rational Analysis? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (1):88-89.
    I agree with Oaksford & Chater (O&C) that human beings resemble Bayesian reasoners much more closely than ones engaging standard logic. However, I have many problems with their framework, which appears to be rooted in normative rather than ecological rationality. The authors also overstate everyday rationality and neglect to account for much relevant psychological work on reasoning.
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  16. Edmund Fantino (2003). Pigeon Parallels to Human Metacognition. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (3):343-344.
    The target authors make a strong case for parallels between human and nonhuman metacognition. The case may be bolstered by an appeal to the literatures on commitment and self-control and to that on observing behavior.
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  17. Mirko Farina (2012). Louise Barrett, Beyond the Brain: How Body and Environment Shape Animal and Human Minds. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 11 (3):415-421.
  18. Gregory J. Feist (2013). The Nature and Nurture of Expertise: A Fourth Dimension. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 12 (2):275-288.
    One formative idea behind the workshop on expertise in Berkeley in August of 2010 was to develop a viable “trading zone” of ideas, which is defined as a location “in which communities with a deep problem of communication manage to communicate” (Collins et al. 2010, p. 8). In the current case, the goal is to have a trading zone between philosophers, sociologists, and psychologists who communicate their ideas on expertise such that productive interdisciplinary collaboration results. In this paper, I review (...)
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  19. Francesco Ferretti & Erica Cosentino (2013). Time, Language and Flexibility of the Mind: The Role of Mental Time Travel in Linguistic Comprehension and Production. Philosophical Psychology 26 (1):24-46.
    According to Chomsky, creativity is a critical property of human language, particularly the aspect of ?the creative use of language? concerning the appropriateness to a situation. How language can be creative but appropriate to a situation is an unsolvable mystery from the Chomskyan point of view. We propose that language appropriateness can be explained by considering the role of the human capacity for Mental Time Travel at its foundation, together with social and ecological intelligences within a triadic language-grounding system. Our (...)
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  20. Anika Fiebich & Shaun Gallagher (2012). Joint Attention in Joint Action. Philosophical Psychology 26 (4):571-87.
    In this paper, we investigate the role of intention and joint attention in joint actions. Depending on the shared intentions the agents have, we distinguish between joint path-goal actions and joint final-goal actions. We propose an instrumental account of basic joint action analogous to a concept of basic action and argue that intentional joint attention is a basic joint action. Furthermore, we discuss the functional role of intentional joint attention for successful cooperation in complex joint actions. Anika Fiebich is PhD (...)
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  21. Aurelio José Figueredo, Jon A. Sefcek & Sally G. Olderbak (2009). Attachment and Life History Strategy. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (1):26-27.
    Del Giudice addresses a complex and pertinent theoretical issue: the evolutionary adaptiveness of sex differences in attachment styles in relation to life history strategy. Although we applaud Del Giudice for calling attention to the problem, we regret that he does not sufficiently specify how attachment styles serve as an integral part of a coordinate life history strategy for either sex.
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  22. Martin H. Fischer & Richard A. Mills (2008). A Spatial Perspective on Numerical Concepts. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (6):651-652.
    The reliable covariation between numerosity and spatial extent is considered as a strong constraint for inferring the successor principle in numerical cognition. We suggest that children can derive a general number concept from the (experientially) infinite succession of spatial positions during object manipulation.
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  23. Harold D. Fishbein (1998). A Piagetian View of Imitation. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (5):689-690.
    Byrne & Russon argue that the action and program levels of imitation form two discrete categories, with no intermediate steps. A Piagetian view enlarges our understanding of human and ape imitation by showing the developmental paths that imitation takes in the sensory-motor period of intelligence. It is clear from Piaget's (1945/1962) analysis that the action level of imitation is richly varied and that intermediate steps do occur between the action and program levels.
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  24. Carl E. Fisher & Paul S. Appelbaum (2010). Diagnosing Consciousness: Neuroimaging, Law, and the Vegetative State. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 38 (2):374-385.
    In this paper, we review recent neuroimaging investigations of disorders of consciousness and different disciplines' understanding of consciousness itself. We consider potential tests of consciousness, their legal significance, and how they map onto broader themes in U.S. statutory law pertaining to advance directives and surrogate decision-making. In the process, we outline a taxonomy of themes to illustrate and clarify the variance in state-law definitions of consciousness. Finally, we discuss broader scientific, ethical, and legal issues associated with the advent of neuroimaging (...)
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  25. Gary Foster (2011). Overcoming a Euthyphro Problem in Personal Love: Imagination and Personal Identity. Philosophical Psychology 24 (6):825 - 844.
    In this paper I address a Euthyphro problem associated with personal love. Do we love someone because we have reasons for loving that person or do we have reasons for loving that person because we love her? I argue that a relational view of identity will help us move some distance towards resolving this dilemma. But the relational view itself needs to be further supplemented by examining the role that imagination plays both in personal identity and in our experience of (...)
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  26. Debra Friedman & Michael Hechter (2010). Motivating Grandparental Investment. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (1):24-25.
    What makes the question of grandparental investment so very interesting is trying to tease out the underlying motivations. Grandparental investment is variable and grandparental altruism, if it exists at all, is also variable. Neither evolutionary theory nor rational choice theory has an easy time explaining this variation, and insight is further impeded by the absence of any compelling empirical studies designed for the purpose of testing alternative explanations of variations in grandparental investment.
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  27. Ori Friedman & Adam R. Petrashek (2009). Non-Interpretative Metacognition for True Beliefs. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (2):146-147.
    Mindreading often requires access to beliefs, so the mindreading system should be able to self-attribute beliefs, even without self-interpretation. This proposal is consistent with Carruthers' claim that mindreading and metacognition depend on the same cognitive system and the same information as one another; and it may be more consistent with this claim than is Carruthers' account of metacognition.
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  28. Renate Fruchter & Petra Bosch-Sijtsema (2011). The WALL: Participatory Design Workspace in Support of Creativity, Collaboration, and Socialization. [REVIEW] AI and Society 26 (3):221-232.
    A key challenge faced by organizations is to provide project teams with workspaces, information, and collaboration technologies that fosters creativity and high-performance team productivity. This requires understanding the relation between and impacts of (1) workspace, (2) activity and content that is created, and (3) social, behavioral, and cognitive aspects of work. This paper describes an exploratory study of everyday activities in the context of knowledge work in a shared workspace used by a high-tech global design team that explores future products. (...)
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  29. Shaun Gallagher (2012). In Defense of Phenomenological Approaches to Social Cognition: Interacting with the Critics. Review of Philosophy and Psychology 3 (2):187-212.
    I clarify recently developed phenomenological approaches to social cognition. These are approaches that, drawing on developmental science, social neuroscience, and dynamic systems theory, emphasize the involvement of embodied and enactive processes together with communicative and narrative practices in contexts of intersubjective understanding. I review some of the evidence that supports these approaches. I consider a variety of criticisms leveled against them, and defend the role of phenomenology in the explanation of social cognition. Finally, I show how these phenomenological approaches can (...)
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  30. Shaun Gallagher (2000). Reply to Cole, Sacks and Waterman. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 4 (5):167-168.
  31. Martin F. Gardiner (2008). Music Training, Engagement with Sequence, and the Development of the Natural Number Concept in Young Learners. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (6):652-653.
    Studies by Gardiner and colleagues connecting musical pitch and arithmetic learning support Rips et al.'s proposal that natural number concepts are constructed on a base of innate abilities. Our evidence suggests that innate ability concerning sequence ( or BSC) is fundamental. Mathematical engagement relating number to BSC does not develop automatically, but, rather, should be encouraged through teaching.
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  32. Jay L. Garfield, Mindfulness and Ethics: Attention, Virtue and Perfection.
    Mindfulness is regarded by all scholars and practitioners of all Buddhist traditions as essential not only for the development of insight, but also for the cultivation and maintenance of ethical discipline. The English term denotes the joint operation of what are regarded in Buddhist philosophy of mind as two cognitive functions: sati/smṛti/dran pa, which we might translate as attention in this context (although the semantic range of these terms also encompasses memory or recollection) and sampajañña/samprajanya /shes bzhin , which I (...)
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  33. Maryanne Garry, Elizabeth F. Loftus & Scott W. Brown (1994). Memory: A River Runs Through It. Consciousness and Cognition 3 (3-4):438-451.
  34. Dedre Gentner (2010). Psychology in Cognitive Science: 1978–2038. Topics in Cognitive Science 2 (3):328-344.
    This paper considers the past and future of Psychology within Cognitive Science. In the history section, I focus on three questions: (a) how has the position of Psychology evolved within Cognitive Science, relative to the other disciplines that make up Cognitive Science; (b) how have particular Cognitive Science areas within Psychology waxed or waned; and (c) what have we gained and lost. After discussing what’s happened since the late 1970s, when the Society and the journal began, I speculate about where (...)
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  35. Raoul Gervais & Erik Weber (2013). Plausibility Versus Richness in Mechanistic Models. Philosophical Psychology 26 (1):139-152.
    In this paper we argue that in recent literature on mechanistic explanations, authors tend to conflate two distinct features that mechanistic models can have or fail to have: plausibility and richness. By plausibility, we mean the probability that a model is correct in the assertions it makes regarding the parts and operations of the mechanism, i.e., that the model is correct as a description of the actual mechanism. By richness, we mean the amount of detail the model gives about the (...)
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  36. Leonard M. Giambra (1995). A Laboratory Method for Investigating Influences on Switching Attention to Task-Unrelated Imagery and Thought. Consciousness and Cognition 4 (1):1-21.
  37. Amihud Gilead (2004). Philosophical Blindness. Review of Metaphysics 58 (1):147 - 170.
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  38. Marco Giudicdele (2009). Human Reproductive Strategies: An Emerging Synthesis? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (1):45-67.
  39. Alvin I. Goldman, Jacob on Mirroring, Simulating and Mindreading.
    Jacob (2008) raises several problems for the alleged link between mirroring and mindreading. This response argues that the best mirroring-mindreading thesis would claim that mirror processes cause, rather than constitute, selected acts of mindreading. Second, the best current evidence for mirror-based mindreading is not found in the motoric domain but in the domains of emotion and sensation, where the evidence (ignored by Jacob) is substantial. Finally, simulation theory should distinguish low-level simulation (mirroring) and high-level simulation (involving pretense or imagination). Jacob (...)
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  40. Robert L. Goldstone (1994). The Role of Similarity in Categorization: Providing a Groundwork. Cognition 52 (2):125-157.
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  41. David W. Green (1998). Refocusing on the Data: A Reply to Hardman. Thinking and Reasoning 4 (1):95 – 96.
    Hardman in press claims that the results of Green and Larking 1995 favour a mental rules theory account of performance in the selection task over a mental model theory account. This reply rebuts his claim.
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  42. Jennifer Greenwood (2011). Contingent Transcranialism and Deep Functional Cognitive Integration: The Case of Human Emotional Ontogenesis. Philosophical Psychology 26 (3):420-436.
    Contingent transcranialists claim that the physical mechanisms of mind are not exclusively intracranial and that genuine cognitive systems can extend into cognizers' physical and socio-cultural environments. They further claim that extended cognitive systems must include the deep functional integration of external environmental resources with internal neural resources. They have found it difficult, however, to explicate the precise nature of such deep functional integration and provide compelling examples of it. Contingent intracranialists deny that extracranial resources can be components of genuine extended (...)
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  43. Don Gustafson (1995). Eighteen Months on the Planet and Already a Psychological Theorist. Philosophical Psychology 8 (2):125 – 137.
    A critical review essay of The Child's Theory of Mind , Henry M. Wellman, 1992, Cambridge, MA, MIT Press, xiii + 358 pp, $16.95; and Young Children's Understanding of Pretense , Paul L. Harris, Robert D. Kavanaugh, 1993, with Commentary by Henry M. Wellman, Anne K. Hickling and a Reply by the authors. Monographs of the Society for Research in Child Development , Serial No. 231, Vol. 58, No. 1. Chicago, The University of Chicago Press, v + 110 (...)
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  44. Raymond Hames (2010). Grandparental Transfers and Kin Selection. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (1):26-27.
    In the analysis of intergenerational transfer, several improvements can be made. First, following kin selection theory, grandparents have kin other than grandchildren in which to invest and therefore any investigation into grandparents should take this perspective. Secondly, how transfers actually enhance the survivorship of younger relatives such as grandchildren must be better measured, especially in the ethnographic literature. Finally, the problem of indirect investments or targeting must be considered.
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  45. Judith Rich Harris (2009). Attachment Theory Underestimates the Child. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (1):30-30.
    The problem with elaborations of attachment theory is attachment theory itself. How would a mind that works the way the theory posits have increased its owner's fitness in hunter-gatherer times? The child's mind is more capacious and discerning than attachment theorists give it credit for. Early-appearing, long-lasting personality characteristics, often mistaken for the lingering effects of early experiences, are more likely due to genetic influences on personality.
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  46. Mikolaj Hernik, Pasco Fearon & Peter Fonagy (2009). There Must Be More to Development of Mindreading and Metacognition Than Passing False Belief Tasks. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (2):147-148.
    We argue that while it is a valuable contribution, Carruthers' model may be too restrictive to elaborate our understanding of the development of mindreading and metacognition, or to enrich our knowledge of individual differences and psychopathology. To illustrate, we describe pertinent examples where there may be a critical interplay between primitive social-cognitive processes and emerging self-attributions.
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  47. Peter J. Hills, Magda A. Werno & Michael B. Lewis (2011). Sad People Are More Accurate at Face Recognition Than Happy People. Consciousness and Cognition 20 (4):1502-1517.
  48. Douglas L. Hintzman (2008). Recursive Reminding and Children's Concepts of Number. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (6):656-657.
    According to the recursive reminding hypothesis, repetition interacts with episodic memory to produce memory representations that encode experiences of reminding. These representations provide the rememberer with a basis for differentiating among the first time something happens, the second time it happens, and so on. I argue that such representations could mediate children's understanding of natural number.
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  49. Henning Holle, Michael Banissy, Thomas Wright, Natalie Bowling & Jamie Ward (2011). “That's Not a Real Body”: Identifying Stimulus Qualities That Modulate Synaesthetic Experiences of Touch. Consciousness and Cognition 20 (3):720-726.
  50. Johannes Hönekopp (2009). Pre-Adjustment of Adult Attachment Style to Extrinsic Risk Levels Via Early Attachment Style is Neither Specific, nor Reliable, nor Effective, and is Thus Not an Adaptation. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (1):31-31.
    The mechanism proposed by Del Giudice by which adult attachment style is adapted to the extrinsic risk in the local environment via attachment style during the early years does not fulfill important criteria of an adaptation. The proposed mechanism is neither specific, nor developmentally reliable, nor effective. Therefore, it should not be considered an adaptation.
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