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  1. Diederik Aerts (2013). The Quantum Mechanics and Conceptuality: Matter, Histories, Semantics, and Space-Time. Scientiae Studia 11 (1):75-99.
    Elaboramos aquí una nueva interpretación propuesta recientemente de la teoría cuántica, según la cual las partículas cuánticas son consideradas como entidades conceptuales que median entre los pedazos de materia ordinaria los cuales son considerados como estructuras de memoria para ellos. Nuestro objetivo es identificar qué es lo equivalente para el ámbito cognitivo humano de lo que el espacio-tiempo físico es para el ámbito de las partículas cuánticas y de la materia ordinaria. Para ello, se identifica la noción de "historia" como (...)
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  2. Diederik Aerts (2009). Quantum Particles as Conceptual Entities: A Possible Explanatory Framework for Quantum Theory. [REVIEW] Foundations of Science 14 (4):361-411.
    We put forward a possible new interpretation and explanatory framework for quantum theory. The basic hypothesis underlying this new framework is that quantum particles are conceptual entities. More concretely, we propose that quantum particles interact with ordinary matter, nuclei, atoms, molecules, macroscopic material entities, measuring apparatuses, in a similar way to how human concepts interact with memory structures, human minds or artificial memories. We analyze the most characteristic aspects of quantum theory, i.e. entanglement and non-locality, interference and superposition, identity and (...)
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  3. Diederik Aerts, Jan Broekaert & Sonja Smets (1999). The Liar-Paradox in a Quantum Mechanical Perspective. Foundations of Science 4 (2):115-132.
    In this paper we concentrate on the nature of the liar paradox asa cognitive entity; a consistently testable configuration of properties. We elaborate further on a quantum mechanical model (Aerts, Broekaert and Smets, 1999) that has been proposed to analyze the dynamics involved, and we focus on the interpretation and concomitant philosophical picture. Some conclusions we draw from our model favor an effective realistic interpretation of cognitive reality.
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  4. David Z. Albert (1987). A Quantum-Mechanical Automation. Philosophy of Science 54 (4):577-585.
    A Quantum-Mechanical automation, equipped with mechanisms for the measurement and the recording and the prediction of certain physical properties of the world, is described. It is inquired what sort of empirical description such an automation would produce of itself. It turns out that this description would be a very novel one, one such as was never imagined in the conventional discussions of measurement.
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  5. David Albert & Barry Loewer (1988). Interpreting the Many-Worlds Interpretation. Synthese 77 (November):195-213.
  6. Harald Atmanspacher, Quantum Approaches to Consciousness. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    It is widely accepted that consciousness or, more generally, mental activity is in some way correlated to the behavior of the material brain. Since quantum theory is the most fundamental theory of matter that is currently available, it is a legitimate question to ask whether quantum theory can help us to understand consciousness. Several approaches answering this question affirmatively, proposed in recent decades, will be surveyed. It will be pointed out that they make different epistemological assumptions, refer to different neurophysiological (...)
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  7. Harald Atmanspacher (2004). Quantum Theory and Consciousness: An Overview with Selected Examples. Discrete Dynamics in Nature and Society 1:51-73.
    It is widely accepted that consciousness or, in other words, mental activity is in some way correlated to the behavior of the brain or, in other words, material brain activity. Since quantum theory is the most fundamental theory of matter that is currently available, it is a legitimate question to ask whether quantum theory can help us to understand consciousness. Several approaches answering this question a?rmatively, proposed in recent decades, will be surveyed. It will be pointed out that they make (...)
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  8. Ludvik Bass (1975). A Quantum-Mechanical Mind-Body Interaction. Foundations of Physics 5 (1):159-72.
    The reduction of a quantum mechanical wave function by the entry of a datum into the consciousness of an observer is used, in a semirealistic neurochemical model, to bring about excitation of a nerve cell in that observer's central nervous system. It is suggested that mind can induce muscular movements by choosing to note data originating from specialized elements of the nervous system. Only the freedom to note or not to note a relevant datum is postulated for the observer's mind; (...)
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  9. David Bourget (2004). Quantum Leaps in Philosophy of Mind. Journal of Consciousness Studies 11 (12):17--42.
    I discuss the quantum mechanical theory of consciousness and freewill offered by Stapp (1993, 1995, 2000, 2004). First I show that decoherence-based arguments do not work against this theory. Then discuss a number of problems with the theory: Stapp's separate accounts of consciousness and freewill are incompatible, the interpretations of QM they are tied to are questionable, the Zeno effect could not enable freewill as he suggests because weakness of will would then be ubiquitous, and the holism of measurement in (...)
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  10. Jeremy Butterfield (1998). Quantum Curiosities of Psychophysics. In J. Cornwell (ed.), Consciousness and Human Identity. Oxford University Press.
    I survey some of the connections between the metaphysics of the relation between mind and matter, and quantum theory’s measurement problem. After discussing the metaphysics, especially the correct formulation of physicalism, I argue that two state-reduction approaches to quantum theory’s measurement problem hold some surprises for philosophers’ discussions of physicalism. Though both approaches are compatible with physicalism, they involve a very different conception of the physical, and of how the physical underpins the mental, from what most philosophers expect. And one (...)
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  11. Jeremy Butterfield (1996). Whither the Minds? British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 47 (2):200-20.
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  12. Jeremy Butterfield (1995). Quantum Theory and the Mind. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 69 (69):113-158.
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  13. Alex Byrne & N. Hall (1999). Chalmers on Consciousness and Quantum Mechanics. Philosophy of Science 66 (3):370-90.
    The textbook presentation of quantum mechanics, in a nutshell, is this. The physical state of any isolated system evolves deterministically in accordance with Schrödinger's equation until a "measurement" of some physical magnitude M (e.g. position, energy, spin) is made. Restricting attention to the case where the values of M are discrete, the system's pre-measurement state-vector f is a linear combination, or "superposition", of vectors f1, f2,... that individually represent states that..
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  14. Chris Clarke (2008). A New Quantum Theoretical Framework for Parapsychology. European Journal of Parapsychology 23 (1):3-30.
    An account is given of a recent proposal to complete modern quantum theory by adding a characterisation of consciousness. The resulting theory is applied to give mechanisms for typical parapsychological phenomena, and ways of testing it are discussed.
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  15. J. Cornwell (ed.) (1998). Consciousness and Human Identity. Oxford University Press.
  16. Rodney Cotterill (2003). The Quantum Brain. Bioessays 25 (1):91-92.
  17. Matthew Donald (2002). Neural Unpredictability, the Interpretation of Quantum Theory, and the Mind-Body Problem. Quant-Ph/0208033.
    It has been suggested, on the one hand, that quantum states are just states of knowledge; and, on the other, that quantum theory is merely a theory of correlations. These suggestions are confronted with problems about the nature of psycho-physical parallelism and about how we could define probabilities for our individual future observations given our individual present and previous observations. The complexity of the problems is underlined by arguments that unpredictability in ordinary everyday neural functioning, ultimately stemming from small-scale uncertainties (...)
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  18. Laura Felline & Guido Bacciagaluppi (forthcoming). Locality and Mentality in Everett Interpretations: Albert and Loewer’s Many Minds. Mind and Matter.
    This is the first of two papers reviewing and analysing the approach to locality and to mind-body dualism proposed in Everett interpreta- tions of quantum mechanics. The planned companion paper will focus on the contemporary decoherence-based approaches to Everett. This paper instead treats the explicitly mentalistic Many Minds Interpreta- tion proposed by David Albert and Barry Loewer (Albert and Loewer 1988). In particular, we investigate what kind of supervenience of the mind on the body is implied by Albert and Loewer’s (...)
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  19. Thomas Filk & Albrecht von Müller (2009). Quantum Physics and Consciousness: The Quest for a Common Conceptual Foundation. Mind and Matter 7 (1):59-80.
    Similar problems keep reappearing in both the discussion about the “hard” problem of consciousness and in fundamental issues in quantum theory. We argue that the similarities are due to common problems within the conceptual foundations of both fields. In quantum physics, the state reduction marks the “coming into being” of a new aspect of reality for which no causal explanation is available. Likewise, the self-referential nature of consciousness constitutes a “coming into being” of a new quality which goes beyond a (...)
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  20. Steven French (2008). Quantum Enigma. Review of Metaphysics 61 (4):857-858.
  21. Matjaz Gams (ed.) (1997). Mind Versus Computer: Were Dreyfus and Winograd Right? Amsterdam: IOS Press.
  22. Shan Gao (2013). A Quantum Physical Argument for Panpsychism. Journal of Consciousness Studies 20 (1-2):1 - 2.
    It has been widely thought that consciousness has no causal efficacy in the physical world. However, this may be not the case. In this paper, we show that a conscious being can distinguish definite perceptions and their quantum superpositions, while a physical measuring system without consciousness cannot distinguish such nonorthogonal quantum states. The possible existence of this distinct quantum physical effect of consciousness may have interesting implications for the science of consciousness. In particular, it suggests that consciousness is not emergent (...)
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  23. Danko Georgiev (2013). Quantum No-Go Theorems and Consciousness. Axiomathes 23 (4):683-695.
    Our conscious minds exist in the Universe, therefore they should be identified with physical states that are subject to physical laws. In classical theories of mind, the mental states are identified with brain states that satisfy the deterministic laws of classical mechanics. This approach, however, leads to insurmountable paradoxes such as epiphenomenal minds and illusionary free will. Alternatively, one may identify mental states with quantum states realized within the brain and try to resolve the above paradoxes using the standard Hilbert (...)
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  24. Dieter Gernert (2011). Distance and Similarity Measures in Generalised Quantum Theory. Axiomathes 21 (2):303-313.
    A summary of recent experimental results shows that entanglement can be generated more easily than before, and that there are improved chances for its persistence. An eminent finding of Generalised Quantum Theory is the insight that the notion of entanglement can be extended, such that, e.g., psychological or psychophysical problem areas can be included, too. First, a general condition for entanglement to occur is given by the term ‘common prearranged context’. A formalised treatment requires a quantitative definition of the similarity (...)
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  25. G. C. Ghirardi, R. Grassi & F. Benatti (1995). Describing the Macroscopic World: Closing the Circle Within the Dynamical Reduction Program. [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 25 (1):5-38.
    With reference to recently proposed theoretical models accounting for reduction in terms of a unified dynamics governing all physical processes, we analyze the problem of working out a worldview accommodating our knowledge about natural phenomena. We stress the relevant conceptual differences between the considered models and standard quantum mechanics. In spite of the fact that both theories describe systems within a genuine Hilbert space framework, the peculiar features of the spontaneous reduction models limit drastically the states which are dynamically stable. (...)
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  26. Gordon G. Globus (2003). Quantum Closures and Disclosures: Thinking-Together Postphenomenology and Quantum Brain Dynamics. John Benjamins.
    CHAPTER Heidegger and the Quantum Brain In any case the orientation to "I" and " consciousness" and re-presentation ...
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  27. Gordon G. Globus (2002). Ontological Implications of Quantum Brain Dynamics. In Kunio Yasue, Marj Jibu & Tarcisio Della Senta (eds.), No Matter, Never Mind. John Benjamins. 33--137.
  28. Gordon G. Globus (1998). Self, Cognition, Qualia, and World in Quantum Brain Dynamics. Journal of Consciousness Studies 5 (1):34-52.
  29. Gordon G. Globus (1996). Quantum Consciousness is Cybernetic. Psyche 2 (21).
  30. B. Goertzel (1992). Quantum Theory and Consciousness. Journal of Mind and Behavior 13 (1):29-36.
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  31. I. J. Good (ed.) (1961). The Scientist Speculates. Heineman.
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  32. A. Gorea (ed.) (1991). Representations of Vision. Cambridge University Press.
    First published in 1991, this stimulating volume on vision extends well beyond the traditional areas of vision research and places the subject in a much broader ...
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  33. Amit Goswami (1990). Consciousness in Quantum Physics and the Mind-Body Problem. Journal of Mind and Behavior 11 (1):75-96.
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  34. Amit Goswami (1989). The Idealistic Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics. Physics Essays 2:385-400.
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  35. Amit Goswami (1986). The Quantum Theory of Consciousness and Psi. PSI Research 5:145-65.
  36. Martin Gough (1995). Consciousness Does Not Complete Quantum Physics. Cogito 9 (3):258-261.
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  37. Basil J. Hiley & D. Peat (eds.) (1987). Quantum Implications: Essays in Honour of David Bohm. Methuen.
    b /b b i Quantum Implications /i /b is dedicated to David Bohm, his work, and the issues raised by his ideas.
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  38. Joachim Keppler (2012). A Conceptual Framework for Consciousness Based on a Deep Understanding of Matter. Philosophy Study 2 (10):689-703.
    One of the main challenges in consciousness research is widely known as the hard problem of consciousness. In order to tackle this problem, I utilize an approach from theoretical physics, called stochastic electrodynamics (SED), which goes one step beyond quantum theory and sheds new light on the reality behind matter. According to this approach, matter is a resonant oscillator that is orchestrated by an all-pervasive stochastic radiation field, called zero-point field (ZPF). The properties of matter are not intrinsic but acquired (...)
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  39. S. Klein (1991). The Duality of Psycho-Physics. In A. Gorea (ed.), Representations of Vision. Cambridge University Press. 231--249.
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  40. Fred Kuttner & Bruce Rosenblum (2006). The Only Objective Evidence for Consciousness. Journal of Mind and Behavior 27 (1):43-56.
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  41. C. Lehner (1997). What It Feels Like to Be in a Superposition, and Why: Consciousness and the Interpretation of Everett's Quantum Mechanics. Synthese 110 (2):191-216.
    This paper attempts an interpretation of Everett's relative state formulation of quantum mechanics that avoids the commitment to new metaphysical entities like ‘worlds’ or ‘minds’. Starting from Everett's quantum mechanical model of an observer, it is argued that an observer's belief to be in an eigenstate of the measurement (corresponding to the observation of a well-defined measurement outcome) is consistent with the fact that she objectively is in a superposition of such states. Subjective states corresponding to such beliefs are constructed. (...)
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  42. Michael Lockwood (1996). Many-Minds Interpretations of Quantum Mechanics. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 47 (2):159-88.
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  43. Michael Lockwood (1989). Mind, Brain, and the Quantum. Oxford University Press.
  44. Jacques Mallah, The Many Computations Interpretation (MCI) of Quantum Mechanics.
    Computationalism provides a framework for understanding how a mathematically describable physical world could give rise to conscious observations without the need for dualism. A criterion is proposed for the implementation of computations by physical systems, which has been a problem for computationalism. Together with an independence criterion for implementations this would allow, in principle, prediction of probabilities for various observations based on counting implementations. Applied to quantum mechanics, this results in a Many Computations Interpretation (MCI), which is an explicit form (...)
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  45. Richard A. Mould (1998). Consciousness and Quantum Mechanics. Foundations of Physics 28 (11):1703-1718.
    For a quantum mechanical measurement to be complete, John von Neumann and others assumed that a conscious observer must be present to affect a reduction or collapse of the state function. Also, William James believed that the influence of consciousness on physical bodies is required by the demands of biological evolution. The author shows how both of these ideas might be correct if there exists a neurological mechanism that responds to the presence of an “inside observer” of a kind defined (...)
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  46. Gregory R. Mulhauser (1995). Materialism and the "Problem" of Quantum Measurement. Minds and Machines 5 (2):207-17.
    For nearly six decades, the conscious observer has played a central and essential rôle in quantum measurement theory. I outline some difficulties which the traditional account of measurement presents for material theories of mind before introducing a new development which promises to exorcise the ghost of consciousness from physics and relieve the cognitive scientist of the burden of explaining why certain material structures reduce wavefunctions by virtue of being conscious while others do not. The interactive decoherence of complex quantum systems (...)
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  47. Gregory R. Mulhauser (1995). On the End of a Quantum-Mechanical Romance. Psyche 2 (19).
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  48. Wayne C. Myrvold (2002). Review of J. A. Barrett, The Quantum Mechanics of Minds and Worlds. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 69:536-38.
    This book is a discussion of the Everett relative-state interpretation of quantum mechanics and related “no collapse” interpretations. The book presumes that its readers will have some familiarity with quantum mechanics and with the interpretational issues connected with it. It would be suitable for use in an introductory graduate course on the philosophy of quantum mechanics, although even experts are likely to enjoy its clear summaries of the material in its purview.
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  49. Gregory Nixon (2011). Between-Two: On the Borderline of Being & Time. [REVIEW] Journal of Consciousness Exploration and Research 2 (2):150-164.
    The purpose of this review article is to attempt to come to grips with the elusive vision of Gordon Globus, especially as revealed in this, his latest book. However, one can only grip that which is tangible and solid and Globus’s marriage of Heideggerian anti-concepts and “quantum neurophilosophy” seems purposefully to evade solidity or grasp. This slippery anti-metaphysics is sometimes a curse for the reader seeking imagistic or conceptual clarity, but, on the other hand, it is also the blessing that (...)
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  50. Don Page (2003). Mindless Sensationalism: A Quantum Framework for Consciousness. In Quentin Smith & Aleksandar Jokic (eds.), Consciousness: New Philosophical Perspectives. Oxford University Press. 468.
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