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  1. H. A. Abramson (ed.) (1952). Problems of Consciousness: Transactions of the Third Conference. Josiah Macy Foundation.
  2. John S. Antrobus (2000). How Does the Dreaming Brain Explain the Dreaming Mind? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (6):904-907.
    Recent work on functional brain architecture during dreaming provides invaluable clues for an understanding of dreaming, but identifying active brain regions during dreaming, together with their waking cognitive and cognitive functions, informs a model that accounts for only the grossest characteristics of dreaming. Improved dreaming models require cross discipline apprehension of what it is we want dreaming models to “explain.” [Hobson et al.; Neilsen; Revonsuo; Solms].
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  3. J. B. Arden (1996). Consciousness, Dreams, and Self: A Transdisciplinary Approach. Psychosocial Press.
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  4. Deirdre Barrett & Patrick McNamara (eds.) (2007). The New Science of Dreaming Vol 3: Cultural and Theoretical Perspectives. Praeger Publishers/Greenwood Publishing Group.
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  5. Imants Baruss (2003). Dreams. In , Alterations of Consciousness: An Empirical Analysis for Social Scientists. American Psychological Association. 79-106.
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  6. Imants Baruss (2003). Sleep. In , Alterations of Consciousness: An Empirical Analysis for Social Scientists. American Psychological Association. 51-78.
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  7. Imants Baruss (2003). Alterations of Consciousness: An Empirical Analysis for Social Scientists. American Psychological Association.
  8. Claudio Bassetti (2001). Disturbances of Consciousness and Sleep-Wake Functions. In Julien Bogousslavsky & Louis R. Caplan (eds.), Stroke Syndromes. Cambridge University Press. 192-210.
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  9. E. Bentley (2000). Awareness: Biorhythms, Sleep and Dreaming. Routledge.
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  10. Susan J. Blackmore (1991). Lucid Dreaming: Awake in Your Sleep? Skeptical Inquirer 15:362-370.
    What could it mean to be conscious in your dreams? For most of us, dreaming is something quite separate from normal life. When we wake up from being chased by a ferocious tiger, or seduced by a devastatingly good-looking Nobel Prize winner we realize with relief or disappointment that "it was only a dream.".
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  11. Julien Bogousslavsky & Louis R. Caplan (eds.) (2001). Stroke Syndromes. Cambridge University Press.
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  12. R. Bootsen, John F. Kihlstrom & Daniel L. Schacter (eds.) (1990). Sleep and Cognition. American Psychological Association Press.
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  13. Jan Born & Steffen Gais (2000). Rem Sleep Deprivation: The Wrong Paradigm Leading to Wrong Conclusions. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (6):912-913.
    There are obvious flaws in REM sleep suppression paradigms that do not allow any conclusion to be drawn either pro or contra the REM sleep-memory hypothesis. However, less intrusive investigations of REM sleep suggest that this sleep stage or its adjunct neuroendocrine characteristics exert a facilitating influence on certain aspects of ongoing memory formation during sleep. [Nielsen; Vertes & Eastman].
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  14. M. Bosinelli (1995). Mind and Consciousness During Sleep. Behavioural Brain Research 69:195-201.
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  15. Derek P. Brereton (2000). Dreaming, Adaptation, and Consciousness: The Social Mapping Hypothesis. Ethos 28 (3):377-409.
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  16. Bill Brewer (2001). Precis of Perception and Reason, and Response to Commentator (Michael Ayers). Philosophy and Phenomenological Research.
    What is the role of conscious perceptual experience in the acquisition of empirical knowledge? My central claim is that a proper account of the way in which perceptual experiences contribute to our understanding of the most basic beliefs about particular things in the mind-independent world around us reveals how such experiences provide peculiarly fundamental reasons for such beliefs. There are, I claim, epistemic requirements upon the very possibility of empirical belief. The crucial epistemological role of experiences lies in their essential (...)
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  17. R. J. Broughton (1982). Human Consciousness and Sleep/Waking Rhythms: A Review and Some Neuropsychological Considerations. Journal of Clinical Neuropsychology 4:193-218.
  18. Kelly Bulkeley (ed.) (2001). Dreams: A Reader on Religious, Cultural, and Psychological Dimensions of Dreaming. Palgrave.
    "Dreams" is a long overdue collection of writing on dreams from many of the top scholars in religious studies, anthropology, and psychology departments.
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  19. J. A. Cheyne, S. D. Rueffer & I. R. Newby-Clark (1999). Hypnagogic and Hypnopompic Hallucinations During Sleep Paralysis: Neurological and Cultural Construction of the Night-Mare. Consciousness and Cognition 8 (3):319-337.
    Hypnagogic and hypnopompic experiences (HHEs) accompanying sleep paralysis (SP) are often cited as sources of accounts of supernatural nocturnal assaults and paranormal experiences. Descriptions of such experiences are remarkably consistent across time and cultures and consistent also with known mechanisms of REM states. A three-factor structural model of HHEs based on their relations both to cultural narratives and REM neurophysiology is developed and tested with several large samples. One factor, labeled Intruder, consisting of sensed presence, fear, and auditory and visual (...)
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  20. P. Cicogna & M. Bosinelli (2001). Consciousness During Dreams. Consciousness and Cognition 10 (1):26-41.
    Two aspects of consciousness are first considered: consciousness as awareness (phenomenological meaning) and consciousness as strategic control (functional meaning). As to awareness, three types can be distinguished: first, awareness as the phenomenal experiences of objects and events; second, awareness as meta-awareness, i.e., the awareness of mental life itself; third, awareness as self-awareness, i.e., the awareness of being oneself. While phenomenal experience and self-awareness are usually present during dreaming (even if many modifications are possible), meta-awareness is usually absent (apart from some (...)
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  21. Jonathan D. Cohen & Jonathan W. Schooler (eds.) (1997). Scientific Approaches to Consciousness. Lawrence Erlbaum.
  22. Allan Combs & Stanley Krippner (1998). Dream Sleep and Waking Reality: A Dynamical View. In Stuart R. Hameroff, Alfred W. Kaszniak & A. C. Scott (eds.), Toward a Science of Consciousness II. MIT Press.
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  23. J. A. J. Drewitt (1911). On the Distinction Between Waking and Dreaming. Mind 20 (77):67-73.
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  24. Owen J. Flanagan (1997). Prospects for a Unified Theory of Consciousness or, What Dreams Are Made Of. In Jonathan D. Cohen & Jonathan W. Schooler (eds.), Scientific Approaches to Consciousness. Lawrence Erlbaum. 405--422.
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  25. D. Foulkes (1990). Dreaming and Consciousness. European Journal of Cognitive Psychology 2:39-55.
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  26. J. Gackenbach & S. LaBerge (1988). Conscious Mind, Sleeping Brain: Perspectives on Lucid Dreaming. Plenum Press.
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  27. Michael S. Gazzaniga (ed.) (1995). The Cognitive Neurosciences. MIT Press.
  28. Christopher D. Green & C. McGreery (1994). Lucid Dreaming: The Paradox of Consciousness During Sleep. Routledge.
    Throughout, there are many case histories to illustrate the text.
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  29. Johan E. Gustafsson (2011). Phenomenal Continuity and the Bridge Problem. Philosophia 39 (2):289–296.
    Any theory that analyses personal identity in terms of phenomenal continuity needs to deal with the ordinary interruptions of our consciousness that it is commonly thought that a person can survive. This is the bridge problem. The present paper offers a novel solution to the bridge problem based on the proposal that dreamless sleep need not interrupt phenomenal continuity. On this solution one can both hold that phenomenal continuity is necessary for personal identity and that persons can survive dreamless sleep.
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  30. K. M. Hearne (1992). Prolucid Dreaming, Lucid Dreams, and Consciousness. Journal of Mental Imagery 16:119-123.
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  31. Allan Hobson (2004). A Model for Madness? Dream Consciousness: Our Understanding of the Neurobiology of Sleep Offers Insight Into Abnormalities in the Waking Brain. Nature 430 (6995):21.
  32. J. Allan Hobson (2003). The Dream Drugstore: Chemically Altered States of Consciousness. MIT Press.
    In this book J. Allan Hobson offers a new understanding of altered states of consciousness based on knowledge of how our brain chemistry is balanced when we are...
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  33. J. Allan Hobson (1998). The Conscious State Paradigm: A Neuropsychological Analysis of Waking, Sleeping, and Dreaming. In Stuart R. Hameroff, Alfred W. Kaszniak & A. C. Scott (eds.), Toward a Science of Consciousness II. MIT Press. 2--473.
  34. J. Allan Hobson & Edward F. Pace-Schott (2002). The Cognitive Neuroscience of Sleep: Neuronal Systems, Consciousness and Learning. Nature Reviews Neuroscience 3:679-93.
  35. J. Allan Hobson, Edward F. Pace-Schott & Robert Stickgold (2003). Dreaming and the Brain: Toward a Cognitive Neuroscience of Conscious States. In Edward F. Pace-Schott, Mark Solms, Mark Blagrove & Stevan Harnad (eds.), Sleep and Dreaming: Scientific Advances and Reconsiderations. Cambridge University Press. 793-842.
    Sleep researchers in different disciplines disagree about how fully dreaming can be explained in terms of brain physiology. Debate has focused on whether REM sleep dreaming is qualitatively different from nonREM (NREM) sleep and waking. A review of psychophysiological studies shows clear quantitative differences between REM and NREM mentation and between REM and waking mentation. Recent neuroimaging and neurophysiological studies also differentiate REM, NREM, and waking in features with phenomenological implications. Both evidence and theory suggest that there are isomorphisms between (...)
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  36. J. Allan Hobson, Edward F. Pace-Schott & Robert Stickgold (2000). Consciousness: Its Vicissitudes in Waking and Sleep. In Michael S. Gazzaniga (ed.), The New Cognitive Neurosciences: 2nd Edition. Mit Press.
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  37. J. Allan Hobson, Edward F. Pace-Schott & Robert Stickgold (2000). Dreaming and the Brain: Toward a Cognitive Neuroscience of Conscious States. Behavioral And Brain Sciences 23 (6):793-842; 904-1018; 1083-1121.
    Sleep researchers in different disciplines disagree about how fully dreaming can be explained in terms of brain physiology. Debate has focused on whether REM sleep dreaming is qualitatively different from nonREM (NREM) sleep and waking. A review of psychophysiological studies shows clear quantitative differences between REM and NREM mentation and between REM and waking mentation. Recent neuroimaging and neurophysiological studies also differentiate REM, NREM, and waking in features with phenomenological implications. Both evidence and theory suggest that there are isomorphisms between (...)
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  38. Henry W. Johnstone Jr (1973). Toward a Philosophy of Sleep. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 34 (September):73-81.
    My chief claim is that no one could understand the meaning of either 'consciousness' or 'unconsciousness' unless his consciousness had been interrupted on at least one occasion. I consider various attempts that might be made to teach the meanings of these terms to a person who had never lost consciousness, And I show how these attempts fail. The ideas of consciousness and unconsciousness can occur only to a person in whose experience there has been a gap.
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  39. B. E. Jones (1998). The Neural Basis of Consciousness Across the Sleep-Waking Cycle. In H. Jasper, L. Descarries, V. Castellucci & S. Rossignol (eds.), Consciousness: At the Frontiers of Neuroscience. Lippincott-Raven.
  40. Tracey L. Kahan (2001). Consciousness in Dreaming: A Metacognitive Approach. In Kelly Bulkeley (ed.), Dreams: A Reader on Religious, Cultural, and Psychological Dimensions of Dreaming. Palgrave. 333-360.
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  41. Tracey L. Kahan & S. LaBerge (1996). Cognition and Metacognition in Dreaming and Waking: Comparisons of First and Third-Person Ratings. Dreaming 6:235-249.
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  42. Tracey L. Kahan & S. LaBerge (1994). Lucid Dreaming as Metacognition: Implications for Cognitive Science. Consciousness and Cognition 3 (2):246-64.
  43. David Kahn & J. Allan Hobson (2003). State Dependence of Character Perception: Implausibility Differences in Dreaming and Waking Consciousness. Journal of Consciousness Studies 10 (3):57-68.
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  44. David Kahn, Edward F. Pace-Schott & J. Allan Hobson (1997). Consciousness in Waking and Dreaming: The Roles of Neuronal Oscillation and Neuromodulation in Determining Similarities and Differences. Neuroscience 78:13-38.
  45. D. Khan, Stanley Krippner & Allan Combs (2000). Dreaming and the Self-Organizing Brain. Journal of Consciousness Studies 7:4-11.
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  46. C. Daly King (1947). Dream and the Problem of Consciousness. Journal of General Psychology 37:15-24.
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  47. N. Kleitman (1957). Sleep, Wakefulness, and Consciousness. Psychological Bulletin 54:354-359.
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  48. Miloslava Kozmová & Richard N. Wolman (2006). Self-Awareness in Dreaming. Dreaming 16 (3):196-214.
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  49. Stanley Krippner & Allan Combs (2000). Self-Organization in the Dreaming Brain. Journal of Mind and Behavior 21 (4):399-412.
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  50. S. LaBerge (1998). Dreaming and Consciousness. In Stuart R. Hameroff, Alfred W. Kaszniak & A. C. Scott (eds.), Toward a Science of Consciousness II. MIT Press.
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