This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories
Siblings:
69 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Sort by:
1 — 50 / 69
  1. Stephen W. Ball (1998). Critical Review of Rawls's Political Liberalism: A Utilitarian and Decision-Theoretical Analysis of the Main Arguments. Utilitas 10 (02):222-.
  2. Jeremy Bentham (1997). Bentham on Colonies and Empire. Utilitas 9 (1).
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Lars Bergström (1996). Reflections on Consequentialism. Theoria 62 (1-2):74-94.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Lars Bergström (1977). Utilitarianism and Future Mistakes. Theoria 43 (2):84-102.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Lars Bergström (1966). The Alternatives and Consequences of Actions. Göteborg [Etc.]Almqvist & Wiksell.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Selim Berker, The Unity of Grounding.
    I argue that there is only one grounding/in-virtue-of relation, and that it is indispensable for normative inquiry.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Selim Berker (2009). The Normative Insignificance of Neuroscience. Philosophy and Public Affairs 37 (4):293-329.
    It has been claimed that the recent wave of neuroscientific research into the physiological underpinnings of our moral intuitions has normative implications. In particular, it has been claimed that this research discredits our deontological intuitions about cases, without discrediting our consequentialist intuitions about cases. In this paper I demur. I argue that such attempts to extract normative conclusions from neuroscientific research face a fundamental dilemma: either they focus on the emotional or evolved nature of the psychological processes underlying deontological intuitions, (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Kenneth G. Binmore (2001). John Broome, Ethics Out of Economics, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 1999, Pp. 267. Utilitas 13 (01):127-.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Cyprian Blamires (2013). Gianfranco Pellegrino, La Fabbrica Della Felicità: Liberalismo, Etica E Psicologia in Jeremy Bentham (Naples: Liguori Editore, 2010), Pp. 291. [REVIEW] Utilitas 25 (2):283-284.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Sissela Bok (2000). Henry Sidgwick's Practical Ethics. Utilitas 12 (03):361-.
    How practical can ethics be? To what extent is it possible to put ethics , in the words of Samuel Johnson? In Practical Ethics, Henry Sidgwick offers the distillation of a lifetime of reflection on how to relate moral theory and practice. This book provides both a model and a cautionary example. Its lucid, urbane, and broad-gauged approach to practical moral issues is exemplary; but its very lucidity also exposes the moral risks in Sidgwick's attempt to isolate deliberation about these (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. K. Burgess-Jackson (2001). Shelly Kagan Normative Ethics. Journal of Applied Philosophy 18 (3):314-317.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. J. H. Burns (1996). John M. Robson 1927–1995: A Tribute. Utilitas 8 (01):1-.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. J. H. Burns (1993). Nature and Natural Authority in Bentham. Utilitas 5 (02):209-.
  14. Daniel Burnstone (1992). 'The Very Culture of the Feelings': Poetry and Poets in Mill's Moral Philosophy. Utilitas 4 (01):81-.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Krister Bykvist (2002). Alternative Actions and the Spirit of Consequentialism. Philosophical Studies 107 (1):45 - 68.
    The simple idea behind act-consequentialism isthat we ought to choose the action whoseoutcome is better than that of any alternativeaction. In a recent issue of this journal, ErikCarlson has argued that given a reasonableinterpretation of alternative actions thissimple idea cannot be upheld but that the newtheory he proposes nevertheless preserves theact-consequentialist spirit. My aim in thispaper is to show that Carlson is wrong on bothcounts. His theory, contrary to his ownintentions, is not an act-consequentialisttheory. By building on a theory formulated (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Peter J. Cain (2011). Bentham and the Development of the British Critique of Colonialism. Utilitas 23 (1):1-24.
    This article examines Bentham's contribution to anti-colonial thought in the context of the development of the British radical movement that attacked colonialism on the grounds that it advantaged what Bentham called the at the expense of the . It shows that Bentham was influenced as much by Josiah Tucker and James Anderson as by Adam Smith. Bentham's early economic critique is examined, and the sharp changes in his arguments after 1800 assessed, in the context of the American and French Revolutions (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. David Lee Cale (1980). The Basics of Consequentialism: With an Introduction to Physical Philosophy, and Featuring the Genesis Model of Vecton Theory. Mcclain Print. Co..
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Alan Carter (2001). Can We Harm Future People? Environmental Values 10 (4):429–454.
    It appears to have been established that it is not possible for us to harm distant future generations by failing to adopt long-range welfare policies which would conserve resources or limit pollution. By exploring a number of possible worlds, the present article shows, first, that the argument appears to be at least as telling against Aristotelian, rights-based and Rawlsian approaches as it seems to be against utilitarianism, but second, and most importantly, that it only holds if we fail to view (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Shiri Cohen (2013). Kathleen Blake, The Pleasures of Benthamism (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2009), Pp. 267. Utilitas 25 (2):287-290.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Stuart Mill Cw (2000). The Utility of Religious Illusion: A Critique of JS Mill's Religion of Humanity. Utilitas 12 (2).
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Stephen L. Darwall (ed.) (2003). Consequentialism. Wiley-Blackwell.
    Consequentialism collects, for the first time, both the main classical sources and the central contemporary expressions of this important position. Edited and introduced by Stephen Darwall, these readings are essential for anyone interested in normative ethics.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Geert Demuijnck (2007). More Formalism at the Price of Less Substance. The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 5:161-169.
    On a general level, this paper proposes a critical analysis of one of the attempts to make bridges between economics and moral and political philosophy. A priori, we may expect that formal methods may lead to clearer and more rigorous arguments, and may facilitate practical applications. However, this paper illustrates how precision is bought at the price of becoming tautological. Therefore, the statement that "it is already widely recognized that formal methods derived from economics can contribute to ethics" (Broome 1989: (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Lara Denis (1998). Kantian Consequentialism. Philosophical Review 107 (1):130-133.
  24. Stephen G. Engelmann (2001). Imagining Interest. Utilitas 13 (03):289-.
    Bentham, a founder of political science based on the calculation of interest, has been misread as a crass materialist. I argue, instead, that Bentham's interest is a specific product of the imagination, and the pleasures and pains of which it is composed are also products of the imagination. On my reading, interests and imaginations are always governed and the role of Bentham's political science is to help govern them more effectively and efficiently. Political science is a mode of what he (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Daniel M. Farrell (1998). Brad Hooker (Ed.), Rationality, Rules, and Utility: New Essays on the Moral Philosophy of Richard B. Brandt, Boulder, Westview, 1993, Pp. Vii+ 261. [REVIEW] Utilitas 10 (2):255-.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Fred Feldman (1986). Doing the Best We Can: An Essay in Informal Deontic Logic. D. Reidel Publishing Company.
    However, if we take a more generous view about possibility, then more alternatives present themselves. The best of these may be something that we formerly took to be impossible, and which is better than the best of the earlier possibilities.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Guy Fletcher (2007). Wrongness, Welfarism and Evolution: Crisp on Reasons and the Good. Ratio 20 (3):341–347.
  28. Scott Forschler (2013). Kantian and Consequentialist Ethics: The Gap Can Be Bridged. Metaphilosophy 44 (1-2):88-104.
    Richard Hare argues that the fundamental assumptions of Kant's ethical system should have led Kant to utilitarianism, had Kant not confused a norm's generality with its universality, and hence adopted rigorist, deontological norms. Several authors, including Jens Timmermann, have argued contra Hare that the gap between Kantian and utilitarian/consequentialist ethics is fundamental and cannot be bridged. This article shows that Timmermann's claims rely on a systematic failure to separate normative and metaethical aspects of each view, and that Hare's attempt to (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Richard M. Fox (1986). Motilal Shastri's “Rule Utilitarianism”. Philosophy Research Archives 12:155-162.
    Motilal Shastri developed an ethical theory which closely resembles rule utilitarianism at roughly the same time as and yet in complete independence of English-speaking philosophers. The philosophic significance of his view lies in the manner in which he develops and justifies his position. Shastri contends that efficiency in action requires indifference or inattention to ends. He appears to use the same device for justifying rule-governed duties that Mill uses to justify a move from egoism to altruism: that actions first viewed (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Jeffrey Friedman (1994). Economic Consequentialism and Beyond. Critical Review 8 (4):493-502.
  31. Vasil Gluchman (2007). Human Dignity and Non-Utilitarian Consequentialist "Ethics of Social Consequences". The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 1 (7):159-165.
    The main objective of my paper is to show that human dignity has a significant position in my ethics of social consequences (I defend a form of non-utilitarian consequentialism), arguing for a particular theory of the value of human dignity. I argue that my ethics of social consequences is capable of accepting human dignity and all authentic human moral values without exception. I think that my ethical theory of social consequences (as a form of non-utilitarian consequentialism) can provide the essential (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. William Haines, Consequentialism. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Iain Hampsher-Monk (1994). Jeremy Bentham, Official Aptitude Maximized; Expense Minimized, Ed. Philip Schofield, (The Collected Works of Jeremy Bentham), Clarendon Press, Oxford, 1993, Pp. Li + 504. Utilitas 6 (02):311-.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. R. M. Hare (1989). Brandt on Fairness to Happiness. Social Theory and Practice 15 (1):59-65.
  35. Brad Hooker (2010). Consequentialism. In John Skorupski (ed.), The Routledge Companion to Ethics. Routledge.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Brad Hooker (2000). Sidgwick and Common–Sense Morality. Utilitas 12 (03):347-.
    This paper begins by celebrating Sidgwick's Methods of Ethics. It then discusses Sidgwick's moral epistemology and in particular the coherentist element introduced by his argument from common-sense morality to utilitarianism. The paper moves on to a discussion of how common-sense morality seems more appealing if its principles are formulated as picking out pro tanto considerations rather than all-things-considered demands. Thefinal section of the paper considers the question of which version of utilitarianism follows from Sidgwick's arguments.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Brad Hooker (1998). Richard B. Brandt. Utilitas 10 (03):374-.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Jonathan Hughes (2000). Consequentialism and the Slippery Slope: A Response to Clark. Journal of Applied Philosophy 17 (2):213–220.
    Michael Clark has recently argued that the slippery slope argument against voluntary euthanasia is ‘entirely consequentialist’ and that its use to justify continued prohibition of voluntary euthanasia involves a failure to treat patients who request assistance in ending their lives as ends in themselves. This article agues that in fact the slippery slope is consistent with most forms of deontology, and that it need not involve any violation of the principle that people should be treated as ends, depending upon how (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Paul Hurley (2009). Beyond Consequentialism. Oxford University Press.
    Consequentialism, the theory that morality requires us to promote the best overall outcome, is the default alternative in contemporary moral philosophy, and is highly influential in public discourses beyond academic philosophy. Paul Hurley argues that current discussions of the challenge consequentialism tend to overlook a fundamental challenge to consequentialism. The standard consequentialist account of the content of morality, he argues, cannot be reconciled to the authoritativeness of moral standards for rational agents. If rational agents typically have decisive reasons to do (...)
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Frank Jackson (1987). Group Morality. In J. J. C. Smart, Philip Pettit, Richard Sylvan & Jean Norman (eds.), Metaphysics and Morality: Essays in Honour of J.J.C. Smart. B. Blackwell.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. C. L. R. James (2007). Mill and Sidgwick, Imperialism and Racism. Utilitas 19 (1).
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Larry James (2007). Rex Martin on Mill and Rule Utilitarianism. Southwest Philosophy Review 23 (2):5-8.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. P. J. Kelly (1989). Consequentialism and its Critics, Ed. S. Scheffler, Oxford, Oxford University Press, 1988, Pp. 294. Utilitas 1 (01):166-.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Lisa Kemmerer (2003). Peter Singer, Writings on an Ethical Life, New York, HarperCollins, 2000, Pp. Xx + 361. Utilitas 15 (01):116-.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Antis Loizides (2011). Ben Eggleston, Dale E. Miller and David Weinstein (Eds.), John Stuart Mill and the Art of Life (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2011), Pp. 304. [REVIEW] Utilitas 23 (04):463-466.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Elinor Mason (2009). What is Consequentialism? Think 8 (21):19-28.
    Elinor Mason explains and contrasts consequentialist and duty-based theories of ethics.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. John Stuart Mill (1991). Frightening the'Landed Fogies': Parliamentary Politics and The Coal Question. Utilitas 3 (2).
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Christian Miller (2011). Introduction to Contemporary Meta-Ethics and Normative Ethical Theory. In , The Continuum Companion to Ethics. Continuum.
    The study of morality continues to flourish in contemporary philosophy. As the chapters of this Companion illustrate, new and exciting work is being done on a wide range of topics from the objectivity of morality to the relationship between morality and religious, biological, and feminist concerns. Along with this vast amount of work has come a proliferation of technical terminology and competing positions. The goal of this chapter is to provide an overview of the terrain in contemporary ethics.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. D. E. Miller (2014). Reactive Attitudes and the Hare-Williams Debate: Towards a New Consequentialist Moral Psychology. Philosophical Quarterly 64 (254):39-59.
    Bernard Williams charges that the moral psychology built into R. M. Hare’s utilitarianism is incoherent in virtue of demanding a bifurcated kind of moral thinking that is possible only for agents who fail to reflect properly on their own practical decision making. I mount a qualified defence of Hare’s view by drawing on the account of the ‘reactive attitudes’ found in P. F. Strawson’s ‘Freedom and Resentment’. Against Williams, I argue that the ‘resilience’ of the reactive attitudes ensures that our (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Justin Oakley & Dean Cocking (2005). Consequentialism, Complacency, and Slippery Slope Arguments. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 26 (3):227-239.
    The standard problem with many slippery slope arguments is that they fail to provide us with the necessary evidence to warrant our believing that the significantly morally worse circumstances they predict will in fact come about. As such these arguments have widely been criticised as ‘scare-mongering’. Consequentialists have traditionally been at the forefront of such criticisms, demanding that we get serious about guiding our prescriptions for right action by a comprehensive appreciation of the empirical facts. This is not surprising, since (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 69