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  1. Pat Auger & Timothy M. Devinney (2007). Do What Consumers Say Matter? The Misalignment of Preferences with Unconstrained Ethical Intentions. Journal of Business Ethics 76 (4):361 - 383.
    Nearly all studies of consumers’ willingness to engage in ethical or socially responsible purchasing behavior is based on unconstrained survey response methods. In the present article we ask the question of how well does asking consumers the extent to which they care about a specific social or ethical issue relate to how they would behave in a more constrained environment where there is no socially acceptable response. The results of a comparison between traditional survey questions of “intention to purchase” and (...)
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  2. Pat Auger, Timothy M. Devinney & Jordan J. Louviere (2007). Using Best–Worst Scaling Methodology to Investigate Consumer Ethical Beliefs Across Countries. Journal of Business Ethics 70 (3):299 - 326.
    This study uses best–worst scaling experiments to examine differences across six countries in the attitudes of consumers towards social and ethical issues that included both product related issues (such as recycled packaging) and general social factors (such as human rights). The experiments were conducted using over 600 respondents from Germany, Spain, Turkey, USA, India, and Korea. The results show that there is indeed some variation in the attitudes towards social and ethical issues across these six countries. However, what is more (...)
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  3. Johannes Brinkmann (2005). Understanding Insurance Customer Dishonesty: Outline of a Situational Approach. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 61 (2):183 - 197.
    The paper takes a look at insurance customer dishonesty as a special case of consumer ethics, understood as a way of situation handling, as a moral choice between right and wrong, such as between self-interest vs. common-interest, in other words, a “moral temptation”. After briefly raising the question if different schools, of moral philosophy would conceptualize such moral temptations differently, the paper presents ‘moral psychology’ as a frame of reference, with a focus on cognitive moral development, moral attitude and moral (...)
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  4. Johannes Brinkmann (2004). Looking at Consumer Behavior in a Moral Perspective. Journal of Business Ethics 51 (2):129-141.
    The paper suggests that consumers and their behaviors deserve (much) more attention in our field. After a few website references (about ethical shopping and ethical trade initiatives) and after a brief literature review of recent business ethics and consumer behavior literature conceptual frameworks are suggested. As an open end, the paper contains some empirical references, related to consumer honesty, tax loyalty and to motives for buying organic food, and suggests the development of a consumer morality measurement instrument.
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  5. Johannes Brinkmann & Patrick Lentz (2006). Understanding Insurance Customer Dishonesty: Outline of a Moral-Sociological Approach. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 66 (2/3):177 - 195.
    Most consumer morality studies focus on consumer immorality, i.e. different types and degrees of consumer dishonesty or deviance. This paper follows this tradition, by looking at insurance customer dishonesty. For looking at insurance customer dishonesty in a wider perspective, the paper drafts a sociology of insurance customer morality, including outlines of micro-level, meso-level and macro-level moral sociologies of insurance fraud, as well as a discussion of moral heterogeneity and a critical understanding of deviance. As a next step a few empirical (...)
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  6. Colin Campbell (1994). Consuming Goods and the Good of Consuming. Critical Review 8 (4):503-520.
    The tendency to denigrate consumerism derives from the widespread acceptance of sociological theories that represent consumers as prompted by such reprehensible motives as greed, pride, or envy. These theories are largely unsubstantiated and fail to address the distinctive features of modern consumption, such as the apparent insatiability of wants and the preference for the novel over the familiar. A more plausible view of consumerism regards it as an aspect of hedonism, and links consumption to the widespread practice of daydreaming. Seen (...)
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  7. Iain A. Davies, Zoe Lee & Ine Ahonkhai (2012). Do Consumers Care About Ethical-Luxury? Journal of Business Ethics 106 (1):37-51.
    This article explores the extent to which consumers consider ethics in luxury goods consumption. In particular, it explores whether there is a significant difference between consumers’ propensity to consider ethics in luxury versus commodity purchase and whether consumers are ready to purchase ethical-luxury. Prior research in ethical consumption focuses on low value, commoditized product categories such as food, cosmetics and high street apparel. It is debatable if consumers follow similar ethical consumption patterns in luxury purchases. Findings indicate that consumers’ propensity (...)
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  8. O. Freestone & V. Mitchell (2004). Generation Y Attitudes Towards E-Ethics and Internet-Related Misbehaviours. Journal of Business Ethics 54 (2):121 - 128.
    Aberrant consumer behaviour costs firms millions of pounds a year, and the Internet has provided young techno-literate consumers with a new medium to exploit businesses. This paper addresses Internet related ethics and describes the ways in which young consumers misdemean on the Internet and their attitudes towards these. Using a sample of 219 generation Y consumers, the study identified 24 aberrant behaviours which grouped into five factors; illegal, questionable activities, hacking related, human Internet trade and downloading. Those perceived as least (...)
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  9. Oliver M. Freestone & Peter J. McGoldrick (2008). Motivations of the Ethical Consumer. Journal of Business Ethics 79 (4):445 - 467.
    There are strong indications that many consumers are switching towards more socially and environmentally responsible products and services, reflecting a shift in consumer values indicated in several countries. However, little is known about the motives that drive some toward, or deter others from, higher levels of ethical concern and action in their purchasing decisions. Following a qualitative investigation using ZMET and focus group discussions, a questionnaire was developed and administered to a representative sample of consumers; nearly 1,000 usable questionnaires were (...)
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  10. Monroe Friedman (2001). Ethical Dilemmas Associated with Consumer Boycotts. Journal of Social Philosophy 32 (2):232–240.
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