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Contemporary Chinese Philosophy

Edited by Stephen C. Angle (Wesleyan University)
Assistant editor: Maxwell Fong (Wesleyan University)
About this topic
Summary The time period covered by "Contemporary Chinese Philosophy" runs from the late nineteenth century (the late Qing dynasty) to the present. One of the central dynamics of this era is Chinese thinkers' engagement with European, Indian, and American philosophical traditions. Chinese versions of liberalism and Marxism flourish. Chinese philosophers also reflect critically on their own traditions, leading some to advocate the abandonment of Chinese traditions while others promote renewed or synthetic forms. Several varieties of "New Confucianism" emerge, the most prominent of which is Mou Zongsan's Kantian reading of Song-Ming Neo-Confucianism. ("Neo-Confucianism" generally refers to the revival of Confucianism that began around 1000 CE; "New Confucianism" refers to twentieth-century developments.) In recent years, two main trends have dominated: on the one hand, a back-to-the classics movement that has sometimes been coupled with suspicion about the aptness to China of the Western-inspired category of "philosophy (zhexue)," and on the other hand, the continued proliferation of eclectic, synthetic philosophizing drawing on various sources.
Key works Relatively few of the key works of contemporary Chinese philosophy have been translated, though see Angle & Svensson 2001. For a good collection of secondary essays on major thinkers, see Cheng & Bunnin 2002. CAP provides an important, if controversial, overview of modern Chinese political thinking. Mao's thought is given an insightful treatment in Wakeman 1973; see also Knight 2005. For a good overview of Mou Zongsan, see Chan 2011; for recent developments within Confucianism, see Angle 2012 and Dallmayr & Zhao 2012.
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  1. Pengshan Bao (2012). Feng Liu Qu: Ni You Suo Bu Zhi de Li Shi Ren Wu. Ben Shi Wen Hua Gu Fen You Xian Gong Si.
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  2. Shiquan Cheng (2007). Zhongguo Zhe Xue Zong Lun: Shiquan Xian Sheng Lun Wen Ji. Wen Jing Shu Ju.
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  3. Ik Cho (2006). Chusŏ Yoryu. Sŏul Taehakkyo Kyujanggak HanʼGukhak YŏnʼGuwŏn.
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  4. Fu-ch eng Chou (1997). Lun Jen Ho Jen Ti Chieh Fang.
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  5. Yæon-sik Ch°oe (2003). Ch°Angæop Kwa Susæong Æui Chæongch°I Sasang.
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  6. Li-fu Chʻen (1948). Philosophy of Life. New York, Philosophical Library.
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  7. Hong Deng (2005). Riben de Wang Chong "Lun Heng" Yan Jiu Lun Zhu Mu Lu Bian Nian Ti Yao. Zhi Shu Fang Chu Ban She.
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  8. John King Fairbank (1957). Chinese Thought and Institutions. With Contributions by T'ung-Tsu Ch'ü [and Others.]. University of Chicago Press.
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  9. Keli Fang, Shouyi Yang & Wende Xiao (1986). Zhongguo Zhe Xue Shi Lun Wen Suo Yin.
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  10. Tzu-K. Ai Feng & Meng-Hsiung Ch En (1997). Feng Tzu-K Ai Ssu Hsiang Hsiao P in = Fengzikai Sixiangxiaopin. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  11. Jesse Fleming (1991). A Response to Kuang-Ming Wu's "Non-World-Making". Journal of Chinese Philosophy 18 (1):51-52.
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  12. Zhao Fusan (2012). Chinese Translator's Foreword to Europe: A Cultural History—Fragments of Thought While Facing the Sea. Contemporary Chinese Thought 43 (3):61-72.
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  13. Minjok Kwa Sasang Yon Guhoe (1992). Sadan Ch Ilchongnon.
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  14. Jianning Guo (2008). Dang Dai Zhongguo Zhe Xue =. Fu Dan da Xue Chu Ban She.
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  15. Lihua Guo (2008). Chu Tu Wen Xian Yu Xian Qin Ru Dao Zhe Xue. Wan Juan Lou Tu Shu Gu Fen You Xian Gong Si.
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  16. Jing Haifeng (2005). ""From" Philosophy" to" Chinese Philosophy": Preliminary Thoughts in a Postcolonial Linguistic Context. Contemporary Chinese Thought 37 (1):60-72.
  17. Hyŏn-chʻan Ham (2007). Chu Ton-I: Sŏngnihak Ŭi Pijo. SŏnggyunʼGwan Taehakkyo Chʻulpʻanbu.
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  18. Naichuan He (2007). Min Xue Kun Zhi Lu =. She Hui Ke Xue Wen Xian Chu Ban She.
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  19. Weixi Hu (2005). Zhongguo Zhe Xue Gai Lun =. Beijing da Xue Chu Ban She.
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  20. Weixi Hu (2002). Zhi Shi, Luo Ji Yu Jia Zhi Zhongguo Xin Shi Zai Lun Si Chao de Xing Qi.
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  21. Wenying Liu (2010). Longshang Xue Ren Wen Cun. Gansu Ren Min Chu Ban She.
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  22. Wenying Liu (2002). Zhongguo Zhe Xue Shi.
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  23. Arne Næs & Alastair Hannay (1972). Invitation to Chinese Philosophy Eight Studies. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  24. Chongjing Ou (2003). Zhongguo Zhe Xue Shi. Hong Ye Wen Hua Shi Ye You Xian Gong Si.
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  25. Bãoi Châu Phan (1957). Khãong-Hoc-Ðang. Anh Minh.
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  26. Feng Qi & Hua Dong Shi Fan da Xue (1996). Li Lun, Fang Fa He de Xing Ji Nian Feng Qi. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  27. Jy Ren (1981). The History of Chinese-Philosophy-30 Years of Study. Chinese Studies in Philosophy 12 (2):4-24.
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  28. Jingnan Shu (2008). Zhu Xi Yan Jiu. Ren Min Chu Ban She.
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  29. Li Ming Wen Hua Shi Ye Gong Si (1988). Zhongguo Zhe Xue Cong Lun Ti Yao. Li Ming Wen Hua Shi Ye Gong Si.
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  30. Yoshimi Takeuchi (1966). Shimpen Gendai Chugokuron. Chikuma Shobo.
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  31. Kumaichiro Uchino (1964). Uchino Hakushi Kanreki Toyogaku Ronshu. Kangi Bunka Kenkyukai.
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  32. Hŭi-jae Yi (2010). Pak Se-Dang: T'al Chujahakchŏk Sirhak Sasang Ŭi Sŏn'guja. Sŏnggyun'gwan Taehakkyo Ch'ulp'anbu.
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  33. Qijun Zhang & Yi Wu (1989). Zhongguo Zhe Xue Shi Hua. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  34. Xi Zhu (2004). Chujasŏ Chŏryo. Sŏul Taehakkyo Kyujanggak.
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New Confucianism
  1. Stephen C. Angle (2013). Reply to Critics. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 12 (3):381-388.
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  2. Stephen C. Angle (2012). Contemporary Confucian Political Philosophy: Toward Progressive Confucianism. Polity.
    This book provides an accessible introduction to the main perspectives and topics being debated today, and shows why Progressive Confucianism is a particularly promising approach.
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  3. Stephen C. Angle (2010). A Reply to Fan Ruiping. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 9 (4):463-464.
    A Reply to F an Ruiping Content Type Journal Article DOI 10.1007/s11712-010-9189-7 Authors Stephen C. Angle, Department of Philosophy, Wesleyan University, 350 High Street, Middletown, CT 06459, USA Journal Dao Online ISSN 1569-7274 Print ISSN 1540-3009.
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  4. Stephen C. Angle (2010). Fan, Ruiping, Reconstructionist Confucianism: Rethinking Morality After the West. [REVIEW] Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 9 (3):353-357.
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  5. Stephen C. Angle (2004). New Confucianism: A Critical Examination, Edited by John Makeham. [REVIEW] Journal of Chinese Philosophy 31 (4):535–540.
    This collection of essays explores the development of the New Confucianism movement during the 20th century and questions whether it is, in fact, a distinctly new intellectual movement or one that has been mostly retrospectively created. The questions that contributors to this book seek to answer about this neo-conservative philosophical movement include: “What has been the cross-fertilization between Chinese scholars in China and overseas made possible by the shared discourse of Confucianism?” “To what extent does this discourse transcend geographical, political, (...)
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  6. Stephen C. Angle (2002). Human Rights in Chinese Thought: A Cross-Cultural Inquiry. Cambridge University Press.
    This book is about the origins and development of Chinese ideas of human rights, and about what we in the contemporary world should make of different cultures having different moral ideas. It differs from competing books in two ways. First, its historical account is much fuller, since it shows how Chinese discussions of rights grew out of pre-existing Confucian philosophical concerns. Second, it is also a work of philosophy: it explains what it means to have moral concepts that differ from (...)
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  7. Tomomi Asakura (2014). 'Higashiajia ni tetsugaku wa nai' noka: Kyoto gakuha to Shinjuka (The Problem of East Asian Philosophy: the Kyoto School and New Confucianism). Iwanami Shoten.
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  8. Tomomi Asakura (2014). Philosophy of Doctrinal Classification: Kōyama Iwao and Mou Zongsan. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 13 (4):453-468.
    Doctrinal classification or the panjiao 判教 system of Chinese Buddhism has been rediscovered and renewed in modern East Asian philosophy since both the Kyoto School and New Confucianism clarified the philosophical meaning of this intellectual tradition. The theoretical relation between these two modern reconsiderations, however, has not yet been studied. I analyze the theory of panjiao in Kōyama Iwao 高山岩男 and Mou Zongsan 牟宗三 so as to identify and extract, despite their apparent irrelevance, the same type of philosophical argument concerning (...)
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  9. Tomomi Asakura (2013). On the Principle of Comparative East Asian Philosophy: Nishida Kitarō and Mou Zongsan. National Central University Journal of Humanities 54:1-25.
    Recent research both on the Kyoto School and on the contemporary New Confucians suggests significant similarities between these two modern East Asian philosophies. Still missing is, however, an explanation of the shared philosophical ideas that serve as the foundation for comparative studies. For this reason, I analyze the basic theories of the two distinctly East Asian philosophies of Nishida Kitarō (1870-1945) and Mou Zongsan (1909-95) so as to identify and extract the same type of argument. This is an alternative to (...)
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  10. Tomomi Asakura (2011). On Buddhistic Ontology: A Comparative Study of Mou Zongsan and Kyoto School Philosophy. Philosophy East and West 61 (4):647-678.
    Mou Zongsan's notion of "Buddhistic ontology" is interpreted here in its fundamental difference from his own previous metaphysical scheme, in the light of the Kyoto School philosophers' similar attempts to resolve the Kantian antinomy of practical reason. This is an alternative both to the analysis provided by previous interpreters of Mou's Buddhistic philosophy, such as Hans-Rudolf Kantor and N. Serina Chan, and to the comparative studies of Mou's theories with Kyoto School philosophy by Ng Yu-kwan. Previous researchers considered Mou's Buddhist (...)
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  11. Ji'an Bai (2009). Liang Shuming Kou Shu Shi Lu. Tuan Jie Chu Ban She.
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  12. John B. Berthrong (2008). Riding the Third Wave: T U Weiming's Confucian Axiology. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 7 (4):423-435.
    Weiming) has assisted in defining the New Confucian movement, a philosophical discourse that depends on axiological themes and traits based on an exegesis and defense of the revival and reform of traditional Confucian discourse inherited from the Classical and Neo-Confucian waves in East Asia. Thomas A. Metzger’s discussion of the profound difference between modern Western post-Enlightenment discourse and New Confucian discourse challenges many of Du’s primary assumptions. My conclusion is that Du is both a citizen of the modern Western academy (...)
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  13. Sébastien Billioud (2012). Clower, Jason: The Unlikely Buddhologist, Tiantai Buddhism in Mou Zongsan's New Confucianism. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 11 (1):101-104.
    Clower, Jason: The Unlikely Buddhologist, Tiantai Buddhism in M ou Zongsan’s New Confucianism Content Type Journal Article Pages 1-4 DOI 10.1007/s11712-011-9261-y Authors Sébastien Billioud, Univ Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité. UFR LCAO/East Asian Studies Department, Case 7009, 16 rue Marguerite Duras, 75205 Paris Cedex 13 Paris, France Journal Dao Online ISSN 1569-7274 Print ISSN 1540-3009.
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  14. Sébastien Billioud (2011). Thinking Through Confucian Modernity: A Study of Mou Zongsan's Moral Metaphysics. Brill.
    This book explores a pivotal dimension of Mou Zongsan’s philosophy—that is, his project of reconstructing a moral metaphysics based largely on a dialogue between reinterpreted Chinese thought and Kantism—and thoroughly analyzes a ...
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  15. Sébastien Billioud (2006). Mou Zongsan's Problem with the Heideggerian Interpretation of Kant. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 33 (2):225–247.
    The article elucidates the modern Chinese philosopher Mou Zongsan's relation to the philosophy of Martin Heidegger. It postulates that Mou's appropriation of Immanuel Kant to build up his metaphysical system encountered one real obstacle, which was Heidegger's interpretation of the "Critique of Pure Reason" in the "Kantbuch." Heidegger and Mou both link their conceptions of the Self with understandings of ontology which are totally incompatible.
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  16. Nicholas Bunnin (2008). God's Knowledge and Ours: Kant and Mou Zongsan on Intellectual Intuition. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 35 (4):613-624.
    This article examines Mou Zongsan's claim that “if it is true that human beings cannot have intellectual intuition, then the whole of Chinese philosophy must collapse completely, and the thousands years of effort must be in vain. It is just an illusion.” I argue that Mou's commitment to establishing and justifying a “moral metaphysics” was his main motivation for rejecting Kant's denial of the possibility of humans having intellectual intuition. I consider the implications of Mou's response to Kant for the (...)
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