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Business Ethics and Non-Governmental Organizations
  1. Dorothea Baur & Guido Palazzo (2011). The Moral Legitimacy of NGOs as Partners of Corporations. Business Ethics Quarterly 21 (4):579-604.
    Partnerships between companies and NGOs have received considerable at­tention in CSR in the past years. However, the role of NGO legitimacy in such partnerships has thus far been neglected. We argue that NGOs assume a status as special stakeholders of corporations which act on behalf of the common good. This role requires a particular focus on their moral legitimacy. We introduce a conceptual framework for analysing the moral legitimacy of NGOs along three dimensions, building on the theory of deliberative democracy. (...)
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  2. Dorothea Baur & Hans Peter Schmitz (2012). Corporations and NGOs: When Accountability Leads to Co-Optation. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 106 (1):9-21.
    Interactions between corporations and nonprofits are on the rise, frequently driven by a corporate interest in establishing credentials for corporate social responsibility (CSR). In this article, we show how increasing demands for accountability directed at both businesses and NGOs can have the unintended effect of compromising the autonomy of nonprofits and fostering their co-optation. Greater scrutiny of NGO spending driven by self-appointed watchdogs of the nonprofit sector and a prevalence of strategic notions of CSR advanced by corporate actors weaken the (...)
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  3. Terrence Guay, Jonathan P. Doh & Graham Sinclair (2004). Non-Governmental Organizations, Shareholder Activism, and Socially Responsible Investments: Ethical, Strategic, and Governance Implications. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 52 (1):125-139.
    In this article, we document the growing influence of non-governmental organizations (NGOs) in the realm of socially responsible investing (SRI). Drawing from ethical and economic perspectives on stakeholder management and agency theory, we develop a framework to understand how and when NGOs will be most influential in shaping the ethical and social responsibility orientations of business using the emergence of SRI as the primary influencing vehicle. We find that NGOs have opportunities to influence corporate conduct via direct, indirect, and interactive (...)
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  4. Daejoong Kim & Yoonjae Nam (2012). Corporate Relations with Environmental Organizations Represented by Hyperlinks on the Fortune Global 500 Companies' Websites. Journal of Business Ethics 105 (4):475-487.
    This study investigates corporate relationships with environmental organizations by examining hyperlinks in the corporate environmental responsibility (CER) sections of the Fortune 2008 Global 500 corporate websites. It is assumed that hyperlinked organizations either represent their current inter-organizational relationship or create symbolic relationships among organizations. Results show that Asian companies have fewer hyperlink relations with other organizations compared with those in North America and Western Europe. Network analysis also confirms that U.S. companies are explicitly connected with stakeholders for CER practices, and (...)
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  5. Josep F. Mària & Daniel Arenas (2009). Societal Ethos and Economic Development Organizations in Nicaragua. Journal of Business Ethics 88 (2):231 - 244.
    This article analyzes efforts in Nicaragua to create ethical organizations and an ethical economy. Three societal ethea found in contemporary Nicaragua are examined: the ethos of revolution, the ethos of corruption, and the ethos of human development. The emerging ethos of human development provides the most hope for the nation's social and economic evolution. The practices of three successful economic development organizations explicitly aligned with the ethos of human development are described and evaluated: (1) a microfinance foundation (FDL), (2) a (...)
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Business Ethics and Public Policy
  1. Susan Ariel Aaronson (2005). “Minding Our Business”: What the United States Government has Done and Can Do to Ensure That U.S. Multinationals Act Responsibly in Foreign Markets. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 59 (1-2):175 - 198.
    The United States Government does not mandate that US based firms follow US social and environmental law in foreign markets. However, because many developing countries do not have strong human rights, labor, and environmental laws, many multinationals have adopted voluntary corporate responsibility initiatives to self-regulate their overseas social and environmental practices. This article argues that voluntary actions, while important, are insufficient to address the magnitude of problems companies confront as they operate in developing countries where governance is often inadequate. The (...)
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  2. Igor Abramov (2009). Building Peace in Fragile States — Building Trust is Essential for Effective Public-Private Partnerships. Journal of Business Ethics 89 (4):481 - 494.
    Increasingly, the private sector is playing a greater role in supporting peace building efforts in conflict and post-conflict areas by providing critical expertise, know-how, and capital. However, reports of the corrupt practices of both governments and businesses have plagued international peace building efforts, deepening the distrust of stricken communities. Businesses are perceived as being selfish and indifferent to the impact their operations may have on the social and political development of local communities. Additionally, the corruption of local governments has been (...)
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  3. Jenny Fairbrass & Anna Zueva-Owens (2012). Conceptualising Corporate Social Responsibility: 'Relational Governance' Assessed, Augmented, and Adapted. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 105 (3):321-335.
    Academic interest in corporate social responsibility (CSR) can be traced back to the 1930s. Since then an impressive body of empirical data and theory-building has been amassed, mainly located in the fields of management studies and business ethics. One of the most noteworthy recent conceptual contributions to the scholarship is Midttun’s (Corporate Governance 5(3):159–174, 2005 ) CSR-oriented embedded relational model of societal governance. It re-conceptualises the relationships between the state, business, and civil society. Other scholars (In Albareda et al. Corporate (...)
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  4. William C. Frederick (1991). The Moral Authority of Transnational Corporate Codes. Journal of Business Ethics 10 (3):165 - 177.
    Ethical guidelines for multinational corporations are included in several international accords adopted during the past four decades. These guidelines attempt to influence the practices of multinational enterprises in such areas as employment relations, consumer protection, environmental pollution, political participation, and basic human rights. Their moral authority rests upon the competing principles of national sovereignty, social equity, market integrity, and human rights. Both deontological principles and experience-based value systems undergird and justify the primacy of human rights as the fundamental moral authority (...)
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  5. Clinton Free & Vaughan Radcliffe (2009). Accountability in Crisis: The Sponsorship Scandal and the Office of the Comptroller General in Canada. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 84 (2):189 - 208.
    For much of the last 50 years, a key platform animating public sector reform in Canada and elsewhere has been that efficiency and effectiveness can be achieved by adapting private sector financial management methods and practices. We argue that the recent re-establishment of the Office of the Comptroller General (OCG) of Canada represents a key element of a program of strengthening financial accountability that has emerged within the Canadian Federal Government. Although this program is longstanding and is associated Canada’s implementation (...)
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  6. Zoe Gill (2012). Located Subjects: The Daily Lives of Policy Workers. In Angelique Bletsas & Chris Beasley (eds.), Engaging with Carol Bacchi: Strategic Interventions and Exchanges. University of Adelaide Press.
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  7. Susan Goodwin (2012). Women, Policy and Politics: Recasting Policy Studies. In Angelique Bletsas & Chris Beasley (eds.), Engaging with Carol Bacchi: Strategic Interventions and Exchanges. University of Adelaide Press.
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  8. David T. Risser (1989). Punishing Corporations: A Proposal. Business and Professional Ethics Journal 8 (3):83-92.
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  9. Jeffery Smith (2011). A Political Account of Corporate Moral Responsibility. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 14 (2):223 - 246.
    Should we conceive of corporations as entities to which moral responsibility can be attributed? This contribution presents what we will call a political account of corporate moral responsibility. We argue that in modern, liberal democratic societies, there is an underlying political need to attribute greater levels of moral responsibility to corporations. Corporate moral responsibility is essential to the maintenance of social coordination that both advances social welfare and protects citizens' moral entitlements. This political account posits a special capacity of self-governance (...)
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  10. Kristin Voigt, Stuart G. Nicholls & Garrath Williams (2014). Childhood Obesity: Ethical and Policy Issues. Oxford University Press.
    Childhood obesity has become a central concern in many countries and a range of policies have been implemented or proposed to address it. This co-authored book is the first to focus on the ethical and policy questions raised by childhood obesity and its prevention. -/- Throughout the book, the authors emphasize that childhood obesity is a multi-faceted phenomenon, and just one of many issues that parents, schools and societies face. They argue that it is important to acknowledge the resulting complexities (...)
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  11. Steven E. Wallis (2011). Avoiding Policy Failure. Emergent Publications.
    Why do policies fail? How can we objectively choose the best policy from two (or more) competing alternatives? How can we create better policies? To answer these critical questions this book presents an innovative yet workable approach. Avoiding Policy Failure uses emerging metapolicy methodologies in case studies that compare successful policies with ones that have failed. Those studies investigate the systemic nature of each policy text to gain new insights into why policies fail. -/- In addition to providing intriguing directions (...)
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  12. Dita Wickins-Drazilova & Garrath Williams (2011). Ethics and Public Policy. In Luis Moreno, Iris Pigeot & Wolfgang Ahrens (eds.), Epidemiology of Obesity in Children and Adolescents. Springer Science+Business Media. 7--20.
    Ethical reflections help us decide what are the best actions to pursue in difficult and controversial situations. Reflections on public policy consider how to alter patterns of individual activity and institutional policies or frameworks for the better. The rising prevalence of childhood and adolescent obesity may pose serious health issues. As such, it is related to ethical and public policy questions including responsibility for health, food production and consumption, patterns of physical activity, the role of the state, and the rights (...)
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Business Ethics and Religion
  1. Andrew V. Abela (2001). Profit and More: Catholic Social Teaching and the Purpose of the Firm. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 31 (2):107 - 116.
    The empirical findings in Collins and Porras'' study of visionary companies, Built to Last, and the normative claims about the purpose of the business firm in Centesimus Annus are found to be complementary in understanding the purpose of the business firm. A summary of the methodology and findings of Built to Lastand a short overview of Catholic Social Teaching are provided. It is shown that Centesimus Annus'' claim that the purpose of the firm is broader than just profit is consistent (...)
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  2. David Ackerman, Jing Hu & Liyuan Wei (2009). Confucius, Cars, and Big Government: Impact of Government Involvement in Business on Consumer Perceptions Under Confucianism. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 88 (3):473 - 482.
    Building on prior research in Confucianism and business, the current study examines the effects of Confucianism on consumer trust of government involvement with products and company brands. Based on three major ideas of Confucianism – meritocracy, loyalty to superior, and separation of responsibilities – it is expected that consumers under the influence of Confucianism would perceive products from government-involved enterprises to have more desirable attributes and show preference for their company brands. Findings from an empirical study in the Chinese automobile (...)
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  3. Ericka Costa & Tommaso Ramus (2012). The Italian Economia Aziendale and Catholic Social Teaching: How to Apply the Common Good Principle at the Managerial Level. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 106 (1):103-116.
    The ongoing global economic and financial crisis has exposed the risks of considering market and business organizations only as instruments for creating economic wealth while paying little heed to their role in ethics and values. Catholic Social Teaching (CST) could provide a useful contribution in rethinking the role of values in business organizations and markets because CST puts forward an anthropological view that involves thinking of the marketplace as a community of persons with the aim of participating in the Common (...)
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  4. Luis Ferruz, Fernando Muñoz & María Vargas (2012). Managerial Abilities: Evidence From Religious Mutual Fund Managers. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 105 (4):503-517.
    In this study, we analyze the financial performance and the managerial abilities of religious mutual fund managers, implementing a comparative analysis with conventional mutual funds. We use a broad sample, free of survivorship bias, of religious equity mutual funds from the US market, for the period from January 1994 to September 2010. We build a matched-pair conventional sample in order to compare the results obtained for both kinds of mutual fund managers. We analyze stock-picking and market timing abilities, topics widely (...)
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  5. Donald E. Frey (1998). Individualist Economic Values and Self-Interest: The Problem in the Puritan Ethic. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 17 (14):1573-1580.
    The Puritan ethic is conventionally interpreted as a set of individualistic values that encourage a degree of self-interest inimical to the good of organizations and society. A closer reading of original Puritan moralists reveals a different ethic. Puritan moralists simultaneously legitimated economic individualism while urging individuals to work for the common good. They contrasted self-interest and the common good, which they understood to be the sinful and moral ends, respectively, of economic individualism. This polarity can be found in all the (...)
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  6. Hershey H. Friedman (1985). Ethical Behavior in Business: A Hierarchical Approach From the Talmud. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 4 (2):117 - 129.
    The Talmud, the compilation of Jewish oral law, is over 1500 years old and includes extensive discussions of business ethics. This paper presents four levels of ethical behavior in business gleaned from the words of the Talmud. At the lowest level, an individual is just barely inside the law; the highest level is the way of the pious. The author has attempted to relate the ethics in ancient business situations to business practices today.
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  7. Stewart W. Herman (2011). Spirituality, Inc. Business Ethics Quarterly 21 (3):533-537.
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  8. Joan Marques (2012). Consciousness at Work: A Review of Some Important Values, Discussed From a Buddhist Perspective. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 105 (1):27-40.
    This article reviews the element of consciousness from a Buddhist and a non-Buddhist (Western) perspective. Within the Buddhist perspective, two practices toward attaining expanded and purified consciousness will be included: the Seven-Point Mind Training and Vipassana. Within the Western perspective, David Hawkins’ works on consciousness will be used as a main guide. In addition, a number of important concepts that contribute to expanded and purified consciousness will be presented. Among these concepts are impermanence, karma, non-harming (ahimsa), ethics, kindness and compassion, (...)
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  9. Shahnaz Naughton & Tony Naughton (2000). Religion, Ethics and Stock Trading: The Case of an Islamic Equities Market. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 23 (2):145 - 159.
    Islamic banking, based on the prohibition of interest, is well established throughout the Muslim world. Attention has now turned towards applying Islamic principles in equity markets. The search for alternatives to Western style markets has been given added impetus in Muslim countries by the turmoil in Asian financial markets in 1997. Common stocks are a legitimate form of instrument in Islam, but many of the practices associated with stock trading are not. In this paper the instruments traded and the structure (...)
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Business Ethics and Societal Culture
  1. Pat Auger, Timothy M. Devinney & Jordan J. Louviere (2007). Using Best–Worst Scaling Methodology to Investigate Consumer Ethical Beliefs Across Countries. Journal of Business Ethics 70 (3):299 - 326.
    This study uses best–worst scaling experiments to examine differences across six countries in the attitudes of consumers towards social and ethical issues that included both product related issues (such as recycled packaging) and general social factors (such as human rights). The experiments were conducted using over 600 respondents from Germany, Spain, Turkey, USA, India, and Korea. The results show that there is indeed some variation in the attitudes towards social and ethical issues across these six countries. However, what is more (...)
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  2. Catherine N. Axinn, M. Elizabeth Blair, Alla Heorhiadi & Sharon V. Thach (2004). Comparing Ethical Ideologies Across Cultures. Journal of Business Ethics 54 (2):103 - 119.
    Using measures developed by Singhapakdi et al. (1996, Journal of Business ethics 15, 1131–1140) the perceived importance of ethics and social responsibility (PRESOR) is measured among MBA students in the United States, Malaysia and Ukraine revealing a stockholder view and two stakeholder views. Relativism and Idealism are also measured. The scores of MBA students are compared among each other and with those of the U.S. managers who were part of the original study. Managers'' scores tend to be significantly higher on (...)
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  3. Elias Bengtsson (2008). A History of Scandinavian Socially Responsible Investing. Journal of Business Ethics 82 (4):969 - 983.
    This article contributes to the literature on national varieties of socially responsible investment (SRI) by demonstrating how Scandinavian SRI developed from the 60s and onwards. Combining findings on Scandinavian SRI with insights from previous research and institutional theory, the article accounts for the role of changes in societal values and norms, the mechanisms by which SRI practices spread, and how investors adopt and transform practices to suit their surrounding institutional contexts. Especially, the article draws attention to how different categories of (...)
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  4. Marie Bohatá (1997). Business Ethics in Central and Eastern Europe with Special Focus on the Czech Republic. Journal of Business Ethics 16 (14):1571-1577.
    This report characterizes the state of affairs in the field of business ethics in Central and Eastern Europe. It reveals the major problems and challenges brought about by the profound reforms to these societies and economies. It also offers some results of surveys looking at public opinion on morals and ethics, as well as on current business practices. In order to give a complex picture, it presents brief lessons from the history of particular countries. The author, devoting the most attention (...)
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  5. Marie Bohatá (1996). Window on Eastern Europe: Current Issues in Business Ethics in the Czech Republic. Business Ethics 5 (2):116–117.
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  6. Marie Bohatá (1994). Ethics in the Czech Transformation Process. Business Ethics 3 (2):86–92.
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  7. Marie Bohatà (1992). Business and Ethics in Czechoslovakia. Business Ethics 1 (1):55-56.
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  8. Morten P. Broberg (1996). Corporate Social Responsibility in the European Communities — the Scandinavian Viewpoint. Journal of Business Ethics 15 (6):615 - 622.
    Two of the Scandinavian countries, Sweden and Finland have recently joined the European Communities. Together with a third Scandinavian country, Denmark, which joined the Communities two decades ago it seems likely that Scandinavian views and attitudes will make a great impact on the future work of the European Communities — including the on-going harmonisation in the field of corporate social responsibility.This article provides an examination of the Scandinavian view on the five best known models for achieving corporate social responsibility and (...)
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  9. Tomas Brytting (1997). Moral Support Structures in Private Industry -- The Swedish Case. Journal of Business Ethics 16 (7):663-697.
    This study was designed to survey the extent to which private companies in Sweden take structural measures within the field of business ethics: Codes of Ethics; Ethics Committees; Ethics Officers and Ethics Training. This was done in two steps. Through a nation-wide telephone survey, a population of "active" companies were identified. These companies received a questionnaire with detailed questions regarding the design, usage and effects of these measures. The percentage of active companies were found to be a high 46%. National (...)
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  10. Peter Buyaert (2012). CSR and Leadership: Can China Lead a New Paradigm Shift? [REVIEW] Asian Journal of Business Ethics 1 (1):73-77.
    Globally, corporate social responsibility (CSR) needs to find its sustainable development via the recognition of tangible benefits that CSR will bring to organizations and their stakeholders. The less tangible but likely most important benefit lies in the continual improved leadership and management quality emerging from organizations investing in CSR. Companies’ failure to act in a CSR way and the lack of wise leadership and quality management is a dominant root factor in the past scandals and financial crisis. Looking at current (...)
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  11. Ericka Costa & Tommaso Ramus (2012). The Italian Economia Aziendale and Catholic Social Teaching: How to Apply the Common Good Principle at the Managerial Level. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 106 (1):103-116.
    The ongoing global economic and financial crisis has exposed the risks of considering market and business organizations only as instruments for creating economic wealth while paying little heed to their role in ethics and values. Catholic Social Teaching (CST) could provide a useful contribution in rethinking the role of values in business organizations and markets because CST puts forward an anthropological view that involves thinking of the marketplace as a community of persons with the aim of participating in the Common (...)
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  12. Warren French, Harald Zeiss & Andreas Georg Scherer (2001). Intercultural Discourse Ethics: Testing Trompenaars' and Hampden-Turner's Conclusions About Americans and the French. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 34 (3-4):145 - 159.
    Are culture driven ethical conflicts apparent in the discourse of the protagonists? A multi-year, multi-cultural study of managers by Trompenaars and Hampden-Turner resulted in two conclusions relevant to business ethics. The first is that intercultural business conflicts can often be traced to a finite set of cultural differences. The second is that enough similarities exist between cultures to provide the grounds for conflict resolution. The research reported here gives credence to their study when applied to an ethical conflict viewed from (...)
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  13. Stella Kavali, Nikolaos Tzokas & Michael Saren (2001). Corporate Ethics: An Exploration of Contemporary Greece. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 30 (1):87 - 104.
    This study aims to discover marketing professionals'' perceptions on ethical problems and current level of ethics in Greece, as well as, on the policy instruments used by companies to help employees make decisions in a more ethical fashion, using a qualitative research design. Specifically, it reports the results of a series of in-depth interviews conducted with Greek marketing professional employed by multinationals in Greece. A number of topics examining ethical problems, ethical standards, corporate policy instruments and corporate cultureserved as a (...)
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  14. Ann Kent (2011). China 2020. Business Ethics Quarterly 21 (3):537-546.
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  15. Thomas A. Kochan (2012). Building a New Social Contract at Work. Journal of Catholic Social Thought 9 (1):7-22.
  16. Liang-Hung Lin, Yu-Ling Ho & Wei-Hsin Eugenia Lin (2013). Confucian and Taoist Work Values: An Exploratory Study of the Chinese Transformational Leadership Behavior. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 113 (1):91-103.
    When it comes to Chinese transformational leadership behavior, the focus seems to be Confucian work value; nonetheless, it represents only one of the Chinese traditions. In order to have a better understanding the relationship between Chinese traditional values and transformational leadership behavior, Taoist work value should also be taken into consideration. Thus, this study firstly develops Confucian and Taoist work value scale (study 1) and then applies this scale to examine its relationship with transformational leadership (study 2). The results show (...)
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  17. Tony Qian Liu (2010). Confucianism and Business Practices in China. China Financial & Economic Publishing House.
  18. Jeffrey Nesteruk & David T. Risser (1993). Conceptions of the Corporation and Ethical Decision Making in Business. Business and Professional Ethics Journal 12 (1):73-89.
  19. K. Praveen Parboteeah, Helena M. Addae & John B. Cullen (2012). Propensity to Support Sustainability Initiatives: A Cross-National Model. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 105 (3):403-413.
    Businesses and the social sciences are increasingly facing calls to further scholarship dedicated to understand sustainability. Furthermore, multinationals are also facing similar calls given their high profile and their role in environmental degradation. However, a literature review shows that there is very limited understanding of sustainability at a cross-national level. Given the above gaps, we contribute to the literature by examining how selected GLOBE [House et al., Culture, leadership and organizations: The GOBE study of 62 societies. Sage Publications, Thousand Oaks, (...)
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  20. Kyoko Sakuma & Céline Louche (2008). Socially Responsible Investment in Japan: Its Mechanism and Drivers. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 82 (2):425 - 448.
    The paper explores the emergence and development of socially responsible investment (SRI) in Japan. SRI is a recent field in Japan. It is not clear which model it will follow: the European, American or its own model. Through the analysis of the historical roots of SRI, the key actors and motivations that have contributed to its diffusion, the paper provides explorative grounds to sketch the translation mechanisms of SRI in Japan and offers insight into its future path. Based on primary (...)
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  21. Mark S. Schwartz (2012). The State of Business Ethics in Israel: A Light Unto the Nations? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 105 (4):429-446.
    Whether the nation of Israel has become a “light unto the nations” in terms of ethical behavior among its business community remains in doubt. To examine the current state of business ethics in Israel, the study examines the following: (1) the extent of business ethics education in Israel; (2) the existence of formal corporate ethics program elements based on an annual survey of over 50 large Israeli corporations conducted over 5 years (2006–2010); and (3) perceptions of the state of business (...)
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  22. Robin S. Snell, Almaz M.-K. Chak & Jess W.-H. Chu (1999). Codes of Ethics in Hong Kong: Their Adoption and Impact in the Run Up to the 1997 Transition of Sovereignty to China. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 22 (4):281 - 309.
    Following a government campaign run by the Independent Commission Against Corruption (ICAC) in 1994, many Hong Kong companies and trade associations adopted written codes of conduct. The research study reported here examines how and why companies responded, and assesses the impact of code adoption on the moral climate of code adopters. The research involved (a) initial questionnaire surveys to which 184 organisations replied, (b) longitudinal questionnaire-based assessments of moral ethos and conduct in a focal sample of 17 code adopting companies, (...)
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  23. Lei Wang & Heikki Juslin (2009). The Impact of Chinese Culture on Corporate Social Responsibility: The Harmony Approach. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 88 (3):433 - 451.
    Although the history of adopting the Western Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) concept in China spans less than 20 years, the core principles of CSR are not new and can be legitimately interpreted within traditional Chinese culture. We find that the Western CSR concepts do not adapt well to the Chinese market, because they have rarely defined the primary reason for CSR well, and the etic approach to CSR concepts does not take the Chinese reality and culture into consideration. This article (...)
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  24. Wei Yang & Kit-Chun Lam (2012). An Ethical Analysis of Economic Issues Related to the Appreciation of Renminbi. Asian Journal of Business Ethics 1 (1):79-87.
    Since the outbreak of the global financial crisis in 2008, the exchange rate between China and USA has drawn a lot of attention. Because of the balance of payments surplus, China has accumulated a large amount of foreign exchange reserves, and there is much pressure on the Renminbi (RMB) to appreciate. The appreciation of RMB has raised a series of intertwining economic and ethical concerns in China. This paper is an inter-disciplinary study to illustrate the inter-relationship between economics and ethics. (...)
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