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  1. Jill Petersen Adams (2012). Gerhard Richter: Afterness: Figures of Following in Modern Thought and Aesthetics. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 45 (4):587-592.
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  2. Giorgio Agamben (2011). Nymphs. In Jacques Khalip & Robert Mitchell (eds.), Releasing the Image: From Literature to New Media. Stanford University Press.
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  3. Giorgio Agamben (2010). Privation is Like a Face. In Christopher Want (ed.), Philosophers on Art From Kant to the Postmodernists: A Critical Reader. Columbia University Press.
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  4. Giorgio Agamben (1999). The Man Without Content. Stanford University Press.
    In this book, one of Italy's most important and original contemporary philosophers considers the status of art in the modern era. He takes seriously Hegel's claim that art has exhausted its spiritual vocation. He argues, however, that Hegel by no means proclaimed the 'death of art' (as many still imagine) but proclaimed rather the indefinite continuation of art in a 'self-annulling' mode. With astonishing breadth and originality, he probes the meaning, aesthetics, and historical consequences of that self-annulment. He argues that (...)
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  5. Roxana Albu (2002). Force of Imagination. The Sense of the Elemental. Studia Phaenomenologica 2 (3-4):221-226.
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  6. Eric Alliez (2012). Diagrammatic Agency Versus Aesthetic Regime of Contemporary Art: Ernesto Neto's Anti-Leviathan. Deleuze Studies 6 (1):6-26.
    Ernesto Neto's installation at the Panthéon in Paris, Leviathan Toth (2006), brings us into a semiotics of intensities that does not belong to the ‘aesthetic regime’ as described by Jacques Rancière but rather to a Diagrammatic Agency of Contemporary Art. In this case study, the latter is constructed after Deleuze and Guattari – from a politics of the Body without Organs critically and clinically identified to a Body without Image.
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  7. Alain Badiou (2012). Francuski filozof w odpowiedzi polskiemu poecie. Kronos 1 (1).
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  8. Alain Badiou (2010). Art and Philosophy. In Christopher Want (ed.), Philosophers on Art From Kant to the Postmodernists: A Critical Reader. Columbia University Press.
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  9. Alain Badiou (2005). Handbook of Inaesthetics. Stanford University Press.
    Didacticism, romanticism, and classicism are the possible schemata for the knotting of art and philosophy, the third term in this knot being the education of subjects, youth in particular. What characterizes the century that has just come to a close is that, while it underwent the saturation of these three schemata, it failed to introduce a new one. Today, this predicament tends to produce a kind of unknotting of terms, a desperate dis-relation between art and philosophy, together with the pure (...)
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  10. Jennifer Bajorek (2011). Jane Alexander's Anti-Anthropomorphic Photographs. Angelaki 16 (1):79 - 96.
    This essay sets out from a reading of two photomontage projects by South African artist Jane Alexander, ?Adventure Centre? (2000) and ?Survey: Cape of Good Hope? (2005?09), one of Alexander's ongoing ?survey? projects, and remarks on the overwhelming impulse on the part of critics and interpreters to anthropomorphize the figures appearing in the photomontage images. It goes on to explore the hypothesis that Alexander's work in fact resists or refuses these attempts at anthropomorphization, and that this resistance is connected with (...)
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  11. Zsuzsa Baross (2006). The Future of the Past. Angelaki 11 (1):5 – 14.
    It is foolish to talk about the death of the cinema because cinema is still at the beginning [ d but ] of its investigations … Yes, the cinema if it is not killed by a violent death guards the power of a beginning [ un commencement ]. Deleuze , “ Preface ,” The Time-Image1.
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  12. Rudolph Bauer (2012). Undying and Unborn and Unbound Base of Space and Light. Transmission 1 (Awareness).
    This paper focuses on the base of awareness as space and light.
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  13. Andrew Benjamin (2011). On the Image of Painting. Research in Phenomenology 41 (2):181-205.
    Painting can only be thought in relation to the image. And yet, with (and within) painting what continues to endure is the image of painting. While this is staged explicitly in, for example, paintings of St. Luke by artists of the Northern Renaissance—e.g., Rogier van der Weyden, Jan Gossaert, and Simon Marmion—the same concerns are also at work within both the practices as well as the contemporaneous writings that define central aspects of the Italian Renaissance. The aim of this paper (...)
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  14. Andrew E. Benjamin (1991). Art, Mimesis, and the Avant-Garde: Aspects of a Philosophy of Difference. Routledge.
    Art, Mimesis and the Avant-Garde explores the relationship between art and philosophy. Andrew Benjamin argues for a reworking of the task of philosophy in terms of the centrality of ontology. It is in relation to this centrality, understood through the differences between modes of being, that art, mimesis, and the avant-garde come to be presented. A fundamental part of this book is the original interpretations of important contemporary painters and their themes: Lucian Freud's self-portraits, Francis Bacon's use of mirrors, (...)
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  15. Rudolf Bernet (2012). Phenomenological and Aesthetic Epoche: Painting the Invisible Things Themselves. In Dan Zahavi (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Contemporary Phenomenology. Oxford University Press.
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  16. S. L. Bertky (1969). Heidegger's Philosophy of Art. British Journal of Aesthetics 9 (4):353-371.
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  17. Terri Bird (2011). Figuring Materiality. Angelaki 16 (1):5 - 15.
    At the core of conceptual understandings underlying a common-sense comprehension of matter is an assumed opposition of the intelligible and the sensible. Drawing on the writings of Giles Deleuze, Luce Irigaray and Elizabeth Grosz, this essay attempts to rethink the relations of matter through the work of materiality in the context of art. Focusing on the installation COVERS, by Melbourne-based artist Fiona Abicare, this examination argues that a mobilization of the disordering effects of matter instigates an interval. In this passage (...)
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  18. Ernst Bloch (ed.) (1977). Aesthetics and Politics. Nlb.
    Bloch, E. Discussing expressionism.--Lukács, G. Realism in the balance.--Brecht, B. Against Georg Lukács.--Benjamin, W. Conversations with Brecht.--Adorno, T. Letters to Walter Benjamin.--Benjamin, W. Reply.--Adorno, T. Reconciliation under duress.--Adorno, T. Commitment.--Jameson, F. Reflections in conclusion.
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  19. Barbara Bolt (2004). Art Beyond Representation: The Performative Power of the Image. I.B. Tauris.
    Refuting the assumption that art is a representational practice, Bolt's striking argument engages with the work of Heidegger, Deleuze and Guattari, C.S.Peirce and Judith Butler to argue for a performative relationship between art and artist. Drawing on themes as diverse as the work of Cezanne and of Francis Bacon, the transubstantiation of the Catholic sacrament and Wilde's novel The Picture of Dorian Gray , she challenges the metaphor of light as enlightenment, reconceiving this revealing light as the blinding glare of (...)
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  20. William H. Bossart (1968). Heidegger's Theory of Art. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 27 (1):57-66.
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  21. Patrick Brady (1989). Freud, Proust, and Lacan: Theory as Fiction (Review). Philosophy and Literature 13 (2):391-393.
  22. Valerie A. Briginshaw (2005). Difference and Repetition in Both Sitting Duet. Topoi 24 (1):15-28.
    In this paper I identify and explore resonances between a contemporary dance piece – Jonathan Burrowss and Matteo Fargions Both Sitting Duet (2003) – and some theories from Gilles Deleuzes Difference and Repetition (1994). The duet consists of rhythmic, repetitive patterns of mainly hand movements performed by two men, for the most part, sitting on chairs. My argument, with Deleuze, is that the repetitions in the dance are productive rather than reductive. They are never repetitions of the same. The ways (...)
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  23. Thomas Brockelman (2013). The Other Side of the Canvas: Lacan Flips Foucault Over Velázquez. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 46 (2):271-290.
    This essay suggests that the minimal 1966 exchange between Jacques Lacan and Michel Foucault in Lacan’s seminar actually stood in for a much fuller debate about modernity, psychoanalysis and art than its brevity would indicate. Using their contrasting interpretations of Velázquez’s painting, Las Meninas, as its fulcrum, “The Other Side of the Canvas” discovers a Lacanian critique of Foucault’s history of modernity, circa The Order of Things. The effort here is to insert the interpretation of Velázquez into the context of (...)
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  24. Giuliana Bruno (2009). Pleats of Matter, Folds of the Soul. In David Norman Rodowick (ed.), Afterimages of Gilles Deleuze's Film Philosophy. University of Minnesota Press.
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  25. Gerald L. Bruns (2010). David Michael Kleinberg-Levin: Gestures of Ethical Life: Reading Hölderlin's Question of Measure After Heidegger. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 42 (4):573-576.
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  26. Patrick Burke (2003). Kearney's Wagner. Continental Philosophy Review 36 (1):81-91.
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  27. Lorna Burns (2012). Contemporary Caribbean Writing and Deleuze: Literature Between Postcolonialism and Post-Continental Philosophy. Continuum.
    Introduction: How newness enters the world -- Surrealism and the Caribbean: a curious line of resemblance -- Writing back to the colonial event: Derek Walcott and Wilson Harris -- Édouard Glissant's poetics of the chaosmos -- Postcolonial literature as health: Robert Antoni and Nalo Hopkinson.
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  28. Clive Cazeaux (ed.) (2000). The Continental Aesthetics Reader. Routledge.
    The Continental Aesthetics Reader is the first comprehensive anthology of classic writings on art and aesthetics from the major figures in Continental thought. The Reader is divided into six sections, each clearly placed in its historical and philosophical context: Nineteenth Century German Aesthetics, Phenomenology and Hermeneutics, Marxism and Critical Theory, Poststructuralism and Postmodernism, and Psychoanalysis and Feminism. The collection features the most widely read and representative writings of each movement by 34 major thinkers: Kant * Sartre * Benjamin * Lyotard (...)
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  29. Ramona Cormier (1976). Some Implications of the Aesthetic Theory of Camus. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 35 (2):181-187.
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  30. Clayton Crockett (2008). Inspiration, Sublimation and Speech. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 15 (2):62-71.
    Ralph Ellis discusses inspiration in important philosophical and psychological ways, and this response to his essay both appreciates and amplifies his discussion and its conclusions by framing them in terms of sublimation and speech, using insights from the work of Jacques Lacan, Jacques Derrida, and Gilles Deleuze. Inspiration is not derived from another plane of existence, but refers to tbe creation of human meaning and value. Inspiration as a form of sublimation conceives sublimation as a process of substitution that avoids (...)
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  31. Therese Davis (2004). The Face on the Screen: Death, Recognition and Spectatorship. Intellect Books.
    There was a time in screen culture when the facial close-up was a spectacular and mysterious image… The constant bombardment of the super-enlarged, computer-enhanced faces of advertising, the endless 'talking heads' of television and the ever-changing array of film stars' faces have reduced the face to a banal image, while the dream of early film theorists that the 'giant severed heads' of the screen could reveal 'the soul of man' to the masses is long since dead. And yet the end (...)
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  32. Miguel de Beistegui & Simon Sparks (eds.) (2000). Philosophy and Tragedy. Routledge.
    Philosophy and Tragedy is a compelling contribution to that oversight and the first book to address the topic in a major way. Eleven new essays by internationally renowned philosophers clearly show how time and again, major thinkers have returned to tragedy in many of their key works. Philosophy and Tragedy asks why it is that thinkers as far apart as Hegel and Benjamin should make tragedy such and important strand of philosophy should present itself tragically. From Heidegger's reading of Sophocles' (...)
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  33. Arne De Boever (2012). Losing Face: Francis Bacon's 25th Hour. Film-Philosophy 16 (1):85-100.
    Spike Lee’s film 25 th Hour begins with an act of violence that it does not show: instead, the viewer hears the sounds of a dog being beaten. The dog’s menacing growl is then transformed into the growling image of Montgomery ‘Monty’ Brogan’s car speeding through New York. Monty spots the dog, and stops. It is only then that the viewer witnesses the results of the film’s ‘foundational’ act of violence: the bloody body of a dog beaten to pulp. When (...)
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  34. Thomas Docherty (1999). Criticism and Modernity: Aesthetics, Literature, and Nations in Europe and its Academies. OUP Oxford.
    Criticism and Modernity traces the conditions under which criticism emerges as a socio-cultural practice within the institutionalized forms of European modernity and democracy. It argues that criticism is born out of anxieties about national supremacy in the late seventeenth century, with the consequence that the emergent national cultures of the eighteenth century and since become sites for the regulation of the democratic subject through the academic form of arguments about the proper relations of aesthetics to ethics and politics. The central (...)
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  35. Robert J. Dostal (2007). Alan Paskow, the Paradoxes of Art: A Phenomenological Investigation. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 40 (4):455-458.
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  36. Camille Dumoulié (2010). L'entre-deux-morts: Jacques Lacan entre philosophie, littérature et psychanalyse. Princípios 10 (13-14):191-206.
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  37. Harold A. Durfee (1955). Camus' Challenge to Modern Art. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 14 (2):201-205.
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  38. Jean-Baptiste Dussert (2012). Literary Practice According to Michel Henry: A Philosophical Introduction to His Novels. Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 20 (2):139-153.
    Quoique l'auteur de quatre romans, dont l'un a été couronné par l'un des prix littéraires les plus prestigieux, Michel Henry n'a jamais véritablement formulé une esthétique du roman. L'objet de cet article est, après une étude détaillée de son concept de vie, de tenter de saisir quelle place la pratique littéraire pouvait avoir au sein de son système. Autrement dit, elle s'interroge sur la possibilité de fonder sa création littéraire sur sa réflexion philosophique.
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  39. Günter Figal (2010). At the Limit A Commentary on John Sallis, Transfigurements. Research in Phenomenology 40 (1):97-103.
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  40. David H. Fleming & William Brown (2011). Deterritorialisation and Schizoanalysis in David Fincher's Fight Club. Deleuze Studies 5 (2):275-299.
    Taking a schizoanalytic approach to audio-visual images, this article explores some of the radical potentia for deterritorialisation found within David Fincher's Fight Club (1999). The film's potential for deterritorialisation is initially located in an exploration of the film's form and content, which appear designed to interrogate and transcend a series of false binaries between mind and body, inside and outside, male and female. Paying attention to the construction of photorealistic digital spaces and composited images, we examine the actual (and possible) (...)
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  41. Bruce V. Foltz (2001). Nature Godly and Beautiful: The Iconic Earth. Research in Phenomenology 31 (1):113-155.
    Rooted in a tradition of thought and spirituality akin to, yet other than, the onto-theology of the Latin West, the aesthetico-theological experience of the Byzantine icon can help articulate aesthetic and numinous elements of our relation to nature that environmental philosophy should no longer ignore. In contrast to the technical mastery of the natural in Western art inaugurated by the Renaissance, itself related to the emerged technological mastery of nature in the late Middle Ages, the iconic sensibility characteristic of the (...)
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  42. Christopher Fynsk (2000). Infant Figures: The Death of the Infans and Other Scenes of Origin. Stanford University Press.
    This volume juxtaposes philosophical and psychoanalytic speculation with literary and artistic commentary in order to approach a set of questions concerning the human relation to language. The multifold writing of the volume takes the form of a 'triptych' (following the model of works by Francis Bacon) rather than that of a thesis. The central section of the volume contains an extended dialogue on two textual passages from works by Maurice Blanchot and Jacques Lacan. The first part of the volume's triptych (...)
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  43. Christopher Fynsk (1994). Reading the Poetics After the Remarks. Research in Phenomenology 24 (1):57-68.
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  44. R. Gasché (2003). Felicities and Infelicities of a Model: Tragedy and the Present. Review of on Germans and Other Greeks: Tragedy and Ethical Life by Dennis J. Schmidt. Research in Phenomenology 33 (1):287-298.
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  45. Gary Genosko (2009). Subjectivity and Art in Guattari's The Three Ecologies. In Bernd Herzogenrath (ed.), Deleuze/Guattari & Ecology. Palgrave Macmillan. 102--115.
  46. Johnny Golding (2012). Ana-Materialism and the Pineal Eye: Becoming Mouth-Breast (or Visual Arts After Descartes, Bataille, Butler, Deleuze and Synthia with an 'S')'. Philosophy of Photography 3 (1):99-120.
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  47. Jennifer Gosetti-Ferencei (2012). The World and Image of Poetic Language: Heidegger and Blanchot. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 45 (2):189-212.
    This essay engages ways in which the manifestation of ‘world’ occurs in poetry specifically through images, and how we can conceive of the imagination in this regard without reducing the imagination to a mimetic faculty of consciousness subordinate to cognition. Continental thought in the last century offers rich resources for this study. The notion of a ‘world’ is related to the poetic image in ways fundamental to the Heidegger’s theory of language, and may be seen in Continental poetics following Heidegger, (...)
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  48. Thomas Hanna (1962). The Lyrical Existentialists. New York, Atheneum.
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  49. Jonathan Gil Harris (2010). Shakespeare and Literary Theory. OUP Oxford.
    OXFORD SHAKESPEARE TOPICS -/- General Editors: Peter Holland and Stanley Wells -/- Oxford Shakespeare Topics provide students and teachers with short books on important aspects of Shakespeare criticism and scholarship. Each book is written by an authority in its field, and combines accessible style with original discussion of its subject. -/- How is it that the British literary critic Terry Eagleton can say that 'it is difficult to read Shakespeare without feeling that he was almost certainly familiar with the writings (...)
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  50. Kevin Hart (2009). Heard, Seen, and Touched. Research in Phenomenology 39 (1):143-151.
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