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  1. Tracy Adams (2010). Rosalind Brown-Grant, French Romance of the Later Middle Ages: Gender, Morality, and Desire. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2008. Pp. Xi, 254 Plus Black-and-White Frontispiece. $110. [REVIEW] Speculum 85 (3):649-651.
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  2. Janet Afary (2005). Foucault and the Iranian Revolution: Gender and the Seductions of Islamism. University of Chicago Press.
    In 1978, as the protests against the Shah of Iran reached their zenith, philosopher Michel Foucault was working as a special correspondent for Corriere della Sera and le Nouvel Observateur . During his little-known stint as a journalist, Foucault traveled to Iran, met with leaders like Ayatollah Khomeini, and wrote a series of articles on the revolution. Foucault and the Iranian Revolution is the first book-length analysis of these essays on Iran, the majority of which have never before appeared in (...)
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  3. Alia Al-Saji (2010). The Racialization of Muslim Veils: A Philosophical Analysis. Philosophy and Social Criticism 36 (8):875-902.
    This article goes behind stereotypes of Muslim veiling to ask after the representational structure underlying these images. I examine the public debate leading to the 2004 French law banning conspicuous religious signs in schools and French colonial attitudes to veiling in Algeria, in conjunction with discourses on the veil that have arisen in other western contexts. My argument is that western perceptions and representations of veiled Muslim women are not simply about Muslim women themselves. Rather than representing Muslim women, these (...)
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  4. Terry K. Aladjem (1991). The Philosopher's Prism: Foucault, Feminism, and Critique. Political Theory 19 (2):277-291.
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  5. Lilli Alanen & Charlotte Witt (eds.) (2004). Feminist Reflections on the History of Philosophy. Kluwer Academic Publishers.
    Feminist work in the history of philosophy has come of age as an innovative field in the history of philosophy. This volume marks that accomplishment with original essays by leading feminist scholars who ask basic questions: What is distinctive of feminist work in the history of philosophy? Is there a method that is distinctive of feminist historical work? How can women philosophers be meaningfully included in the history of the discipline? Who counts as a philosopher? This collection is a unique (...)
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  6. Linda Alcoff (1996). Dangerous Pleasures: Foucault and the Politics of Pedophilia. In Susan Hekman (ed.), Feminist Interpretations of Foucault. Pennsylvania State Press.
    This paper develops a critique of Foucault's treatment of child sexual abuse in relation to his theory of the relationship between discourse and experience.
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  7. Linda Martin Alcoff (2000). “Merleau-Ponty and Feminist Theory on Experience.”. In Fred Evans Leonard Lawlor (ed.), Chiasm, Merleau-Ponty's Notion of Flesh.
  8. Amy Allen (2013). Feminism, Foucault, and the Critique of Reason: Re-Reading the History of Madness. Foucault Studies 16:15-31.
    This paper situates Lynne Huffer’s recent queer-feminist Foucaultian critique of reason within the context of earlier feminist debates about reason and critically assesses Huffer’s work from the point of view of its faithfulness to Foucault’s work and its implications for feminism. I argue that Huffer’s characterization of Enlightenment reason as despotic not only departs from Foucault’s account of the relationship between power and reason, it also leaves her stuck in the same double binds that plagued earlier feminist critiques of reason. (...)
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  9. Amy Allen (2007). The Politics of Our Selves: Power, Autonomy, and Gender in Contemporary Critical Theory. Columbia University Press.
    Introduction : the politics of our selves -- Foucault, subjectivity, and the enlightenment : a critical reappraisal -- The impurity of practical reason : power and autonomy in Foucault -- Dependency, subordination, and recognition : Butler on subjection -- Empowering the lifeworld? autonomy and power in Habermas -- Contextualizing critical theory -- Engendering critical theory.
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  10. Amy Allen (1999). The Power of Feminist Theory: Domination, Resistance, Solidarity. Westview Press.
    Power is clearly a crucial concept for feminist theory. Insofar as feminists are interested in analyzing power, it is because they have an interest in understanding, critiquing, and ultimately challenging the multiple array of unjust power relations affecting women in contemporary Western societies, including sexism, racism, heterosexism, and class oppression.In The Power of Feminist Theory, Amy Allen diagnoses the inadequacies of previous feminist conceptions of power, and draws on the work of a diverse group of theorists of power, including Michel (...)
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  11. Anita L. Allen, Undressing Difference: The Hijab in the West.
    On March 15, 2006, French President Jacques Chirac signed into law an amendment to his country's education statute, banning the wearing of conspicuous signs of religious affiliation in public schools. Prohibited items included a large cross, a veil, or skullcap. The ban was expressly introduced by lawmakers as an application of the principle of government neutrality, du principe de laïcité. Opponents of the law viewed it primarily as an intolerant assault against the hijab, a head and neck wrap worn by (...)
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  12. Barry Allen (1999). Feminist Interpretations of Michel Foucault Susan J. Hekman, Editor University Park, PA: Pennsylvania State University Press, 1996, Ix + 320 Pp. [REVIEW] Dialogue 38 (01):221-.
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  13. Barry Allen (1999). Feminist Interpretations of Michel Foucault. Dialogue 38 (1):221-222.
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  14. Gill Allwood (1998). French Feminisms: Gender and Violence in Contemporary Theory. Ucl Press.
    This title available in eBook format. Click here for more information . Visit our eBookstore at: www.ebookstore.tandf.co.uk.
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  15. Sonya Andermahr (1997). A Glossary of Feminist Theory. Distributed Exclusively in the Usa by St. Martin's Press.
    This glossary is both an introduction to the key words of feminist critical theories and a guide to their origins. Acknowledging the variety of contemporary feminist theories, the glossary includes entries on black, post-colonial, Italian, and French feminisms, and draws on a wide range of fields including semiotics, psychoanalysis, structuralism, poststructuralism, and deconstruction.
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  16. Anthony Appiah & Henry Louis Gates (eds.) (1995). Identities. University of Chicago Press.
    The study of identity crosses all disciplinary borders to address such issues as the multiple interactions of race, class, and gender in feminist, lesbian, and gay studies, postcolonialism and globalization, and the interrelation of nationalism and ethnicity in ethnic and area studies. Identities will help disrupt the cliche-ridden discourse of identity by exploring the formation of identities and problem of subjectivity. Leading scholars in literary criticism, anthropology, sociology, and philosophy explore such topics as "Gypsies" in the Western imagination, the mobilization (...)
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  17. Márcia Arán (2003). Lacan e o feminino: algumas considerações críticas. Natureza Humana 5 (2):293-327.
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  18. Ellen Armour (2010). Blinding Me with (Queer) Science: Religion, Sexuality, and (Post?) Modernity. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 68 (1):107-119.
    This essay brings to bear insights from continental philosophers Michel Foucault and Judith Butler on the science of (homo)sexuality and, more importantly, the desire to use such science to resolve contemporary conflicts over homosexuality’s acceptability. So-called queer science remains deeply beholden to modern notions of sex, gender, and sexuality, the author argues, a schematic that its premodern (Christian) roots further denaturalize. The philosophical insights drawn from this analysis are then applied to the controversy over homosexuality within global Christianity that often (...)
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  19. Ellen T. Armour (1997). Questions of Proximity: “Woman's Place” in Derrick and Irigaray. Hypatia 12 (1):63-78.
    This article reconsiders the issue of Luce Irigaray's proximity to Jacques Derrida on the question of woman. I use Derrida's reading of Nietzsche in Spurs: Nietzsche's Styles (1979) and Irigaray's reading of Heidegger in L'Oubli de l'air (1983) to argue that reading them as supplements to one another is more accurate and more productive for feminism than separating one from the other. I conclude by laying out the benefits for feminism that such a reading would offer.
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  20. Aurelia Armstrong, Foucault and Feminism. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  21. Alison Assiter (1996). Enlightened Women: Modernist Feminism in a Postmodern Age. Routledge.
    This is a bold and controversial feminist, philosophical critique of postmodernism. While providing a brief and accessible introduction to postmodernist feminist thought, Enlightened Women is also a unique defence of realism and enlightenment philosophy. The first half of the book covers an analysis of some of the most influential postmodernist theorists, such as Luce Irigaray and Judith Butler. In the second half Alison Assiter advocates a return to modernism in feminism. She argues, against the current orthodoxy, that there can be (...)
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  22. Lorraine Attreed (2009). Katherine. L. French, The Good Women of the Parish: Gender and Religion After the Black Death. (The Middle Ages Series.) Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2008. Pp. Xi, 337; Black-and-White Figures, Tables, and Maps. $69.95. [REVIEW] Speculum 84 (2):430-431.
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  23. Kelly H. Ball (2013). &Quot;more or Less Raped&Quot;: Foucault, Causality, and Feminist Critiques of Sexual Violence. Philosophia 3 (1):14.
  24. Marina Paola Banchetti-Robino (2000). F.J.J. Buytendijk on Woman: A Phenomenological Critique. In Linda Fisher & Lester Embree (eds.), Feminist Phenomenology. Kluwer Academic Publishers.
  25. Hazel E. Barnes (2000). Philosophy and Gender: A First-Person View. In Dorothea Olkowski (ed.), Resistance, Flight, Creation: Feminist Enactments of French Philosophy. Cornell University Press. 25--39.
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  26. Elaine Hoffman Baruch (1996). She Speaks/He Listens: Women on the French Analyst's Couch. Routledge.
    Although much attention has been given to Jacques Lacan in his rereading of Freud and to French women analysts in their deconstruction of traditional psychoanalysis, little has been available in the US on contemporary male French analysts and their treatment of women. She Speaks/He Listens illustrates the range of thought among some well-known French male psychoanalysts today--from Lacanians to anti-Lacanians to eclectics--with regard to women and sexual difference. Through the interview format, with its possibilities for surprise and spontaneity, the book (...)
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  27. Giorgio Baruchello (2003). Edith Stein. Symposium: The Canadian Journal of Continental Philosophy 7 (2):246-250.
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  28. Christine Battersby (2000). Learning to Think Intercontinentally: Finding Australian Routes. Hypatia 15 (2):1-17.
    : This introductory essay argues that it is a mistake to represent Australian feminist philosophy as a kind of discourse theory that is "downstream" of the French post-structuralists or North American postmodernists. Starting with the local--and the specifically Australian modes of racial exclusion, in particular--and exploring some of the byways of philosophy, what we encounter is a range of ontological, ethical, and political models that allow a reconfiguration of self, community, and social change.
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  29. Christine Battersby (1998). The Phenomenal Woman: Feminist Metaphysics and the Patterns of Identity. Routledge.
    Christine Battersby rethinks questions of embodiment, essence, sameness and difference, self and "other", patriarchy and power. Using analyses of Kant, Adorno, Irigaray, Butler, Kierkegaard and Deleuze, she challenges those who argue that a feminist metaphysics is a a contradiction in terms. This book explores place for a metaphysics of fluidity in the current debates concerning postmodernism, feminism and identity politics.
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  30. Christine Battersby (1996). Her Blood and His Mirror: Mary Coleridge, Luce Irigaray, and the Female Self. In Richard Thomas Eldridge (ed.), Beyond Representation: Philosophy and Poetic Imagination. Cambridge University Press. 249--272.
  31. Devan Baty (2002). Gender, Rhetoric and Print Culture in French Renaissance Writing (Review). Substance 31 (2):292-296.
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  32. Nancy Bauer (2007). The Second Feminism. Symposia on Gender, Race, and Philosophy.
  33. Vikki Bell (2004). Feminist Interpretations of Michel Foucault. International Studies in Philosophy 36 (4):119-121.
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  34. Dana S. Belu (2012). Nature and Technology in Modern Childbirth: A Phenomenological Interpretation. Techne 16 (1):3-14.
    Abstract: This paper provides a phenomenological interpretation of technological and natural childbirth. By using Heidegger’s ontology of technology to think about childbirth I argue that these two types of contemporary childbirth present us with a false dilemma as both reflect the same norms Heidegger associates with modernity, namely order, control, and efficiency. The paper briefly explains Heidegger’s concept of the enframing as the essence of the technological age while focusing on how it helps us to avoid falling into a technophilic (...)
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  35. Silvia Benso (2004). Stella Sandford, The Metaphysics of Love: Gender and Transcendence in Levinas. Claire Elise Katz, Levinas, Judaism, and the Feminine: The Silent Footsteps of Rebecca. Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 14 (1):98-104.
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  36. Anne-Emmanuelle Berger (1998). The Newly Veiled Woman: Irigaray, Specularity, and the Islamic Veil. Diacritics 28 (1):93-119.
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  37. Bettina Bergo (2003). Kelly Oliver, Witnessing: Beyond Recognition. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 36 (2):203-212.
  38. D. Bergoffen (2000). Simone de Beauvoir: Disrupting the Metonomy of Gender. In Dorothea Olkowski (ed.), Resistance, Flight, Creation: Feminist Enactments of French Philosophy. Cornell University Press. 97--110.
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  39. Philippa Berry (1992). Woman and Space According to Kristeva and Irigaray. In Philippa Berry & Andrew Wernick (eds.), Shadow of Spirit: Postmodernism and Religion. Routledge. 250--64.
  40. Philippa Berry & Andrew Wernick (eds.) (1992). Shadow of Spirit: Postmodernism and Religion. Routledge.
    By illuminating the striking affinity between the most innovative aspects of postmodern thought and religious mystical discourse, Shadow of Spirit challenges the long established assumption that western thought is committed to nihilism. This collection of essays by internationally recognized scholars explores the implications of the fascination with the "sacred," "divine" or "infinite" which characterizes much contemporary thought. It shows how these concerns have surfaced in the work of Derrida, Baudrillard, Lyotard, Kristeva, Irigaray and others. Examining the connection between this postmodern (...)
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  41. D. M. Betz (2003). Colonial Citizens: Republican Rights, Paternal Privilege, and Gender in French Syria and Lebanon. By Elizabeth Thompson. The European Legacy 8 (1):92-93.
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  42. D. M. Betz (2000). Articulations of Difference: Gender Studies and Writing in French. Edited by Dominique D. Fisher and Lawrence R. Schehr. [REVIEW] The European Legacy 5 (5):743-743.
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  43. Emanuela Bianchi (2012). The Interruptive Feminine: Aleatory Time and Feminist Politics. In Henriette Gunkel, Chrysanthi Nigianni & Fanny Söderbäck (eds.), Undutiful Daughters: New Directions in Feminist Thought and Practice. Palgrave Macmillan.
  44. Emanuela Bianchi (2012). Natal Bodies, Mortal Bodies, Sexual Bodies. Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 33 (1):57-84.
  45. Emanuela Bianchi (2012). Rewriting Difference: Irigaray and “The Greeks”. Edited by Elena Tzelepis and Athena Athanasiou. Albany: State University of New York Press, 2010. [REVIEW] Hypatia 27 (2):455-460.
  46. Emanuela Bianchi (2010). Sexual Topologies in the Aristotelian Cosmos: Revisiting Irigaray's Physics of Sexual Difference. Continental Philosophy Review 43 (3):373-389.
    Irigaray’s engagement with Aristotelian physics provides a specific diagnosis of women’s ontological and ethical situation under Western metaphysics: Women provide place and containership to men, but have no place of their own, rendering them uncontained and abyssal. She calls for a reconfiguration of this topological imaginary as a precondition for an ethics of sexual difference. This paper returns to Aristotelian cosmological texts to further investigate the topologies of sexual difference suggested there. In an analysis both psychoanalytic and phenomenological, the paper (...)
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  47. Emanuela Bianchi (2007). Aristotelian Dunamis and Sexual Difference. Philosophy Today 51 (Supplement):89-97.
  48. Emanuela Bianchi (2006). Material Vicissitudes and Technical Wonders: The Ambiguous Figure of Automaton in Aristotle's Metaphysics of Sexual Difference. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 11 (1):109-139.
    In Aristotle’s physics and biology, matter’s capacity for spontaneous, opaque, chance deviation is named by automaton and marked with a feminine sign, while at the same time these mysterious motions are articulated, rendered knowable and predictable via the figure of ta automata, the automatic puppets. This paper traces how automaton functions in the Aristotelian text as a symptomatic crossing-point, an uncanny and chiasmatic figure in which materiality and logos, phusis, and technē, death and life, masculine and feminine, are intertwined and (...)
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  49. Emanuela Bianchi (2006). Receptacle/Chōra: Figuring the Errant Feminine in Plato's Timaeus. Hypatia 21 (4):124-146.
    This essay undertakes a reexamination of the notion of the receptacle/chōra in Plato's Timaeus, asking what its value may be to feminists seeking to understand the topology of the feminine in Western philosophy. As the source of cosmic motion as well as a restless figurality, labile and polyvocal, the receptacle/chōra offers a fecund zone of destabilization that allows for an immanent critique of ancient metaphysics. Engaging with Derridean, Irigarayan, and Kristevan analyses, Bianchi explores whether receptacle/chōra can exceed its reduction to (...)
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  50. Emanuela Bianchi (ed.) (1999). Is Feminist Philosophy Philosophy? Northwestern University Press.
    Drawing attention to the vexed relationship between feminist theory and philosophy, Is Feminist Philosophy Philosophy? demonstrates the spectrum of significant work being done at this contested boundary. The volume offers clear statements by seventeen distinguished scholars as well as a full range of philosophical approaches; it also presents feminist philosophers in conversation both as feminists and as philosophers, making the book accessible to a wide audience. -/- Table of Contents -/- Opening plenary: Drucilla Cornell, Jacques Derrida, and Teresa Brennan — (...)
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1 — 50 / 348