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  1. Deborah Baumgold (2009). Hobbesian Absolutism and the Paradox of Modern Contractarianism. European Journal of Political Theory 8 (2):207-228.
    Hobbes's defense of absolutism involves the dual claims that consent is the foundation of legitimate authority and that sovereignty is necessarily absolute. It is a paradoxical combination of claims: If absolute government is the product of choice how can it also be the sole possible constitution? While all of Hobbes's contractarian successors have rejected his preference for absolutism, his dual claims have become commonplace. Since Hobbes, contract thinkers routinely assert that people will choose their preferred constitution and that it is (...)
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  2. Kenneth Baynes (1989). Kant on Property Rights and the Social Contract. The Monist 72 (3):433-453.
  3. Corey Brettschneider (2011). Rights Within the Social Contract : Rousseau on Punishment. In Austin Sarat, Lawrence Douglas & Martha Merrill Umphrey (eds.), Law as Punishment/Law as Regulation. Stanford Law Books.
  4. Justin Cruickshank (2000). Ethnocentrism, Social Contract Liberalism and Positivistic-Conservatism: Rorty's Three Theses on Politics. Res Publica 6 (1):1-23.
    In this article I argue that Rorty has three separatearguments for liberalism. The pragmatic-ethnocentric argument for liberalism,as a system which works for `us liberals'', is rejectedfor entailing relativism. The social contract argument results in an extreme formof individualism. This renders politics redundantbecause there is no need for the (liberal) state toprotect poetic individuals, who are capable ofdefending themselves. Even if the less able areharmed, the state could not prevent this, givenRorty''s arguments about discursive enrichment withina language game. Finally, the positivistic-conservative (...)
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  5. Fred D'Agostino, John Thrasher & Gerald Gaus, Contemporary Approaches to the Social Contract. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  6. Stuart Dalton (1996). The General Will and the Legislator in Rousseau's on the Social Contract. Southwest Philosophy Review 12 (2):85-97.
  7. Samuel Richard Freeman (2007). Justice and the Social Contract: Essays on Rawlsian Political Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    John Rawls (1921-2002) was one of the 20th century's most important philosophers and continues to be among the most widely discussed of contemporary thinkers. His work, particularly A Theory of Justice, is integral to discussions of social and international justice, democracy, liberalism, welfare economics, and constitutional law, in departments of philosophy, politics, economics, law, public policy, and others. Samuel Freeman is one of Rawls's foremost interpreters. This volume contains nine of his essays on Rawls and Rawlsian justice, two of which (...)
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  8. Robert Garner (2012). Much Ado About Nothing?: Barry, Justice and Animals. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 15 (3):363-376.
    This article examines the extent to which Brian Barry?s contractarian political theory ? justice as impartiality ? is able to incorporate the interests of animals. Despite the initial optimism that Barry might provide a theory of justice that can provide substantial protection for the interests of animals, it is clear that he offers relatively little. Insofar as animals can be protected within justice as impartiality, they are not being protected as a result of their intrinsic value, but merely as one, (...)
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  9. Gerald Gaus (2012). Justification, Choice and Promise: Three Devices of the Consent Tradition in a Diverse Society. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 15 (2):109-127.
    The twin ideas at the heart of the social contract tradition are that persons are naturally free and equal, and that genuine political obligations must in some way be based on the consent of those obligated. The Lockean tradition has held that consent must be in the form of explicit choice; Kantian contractualism has insisted on consent as rational endorsement. In this paper I seek to bring the Kantian and Lockean contract traditions together. Kantian rational justification and actual choice are (...)
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  10. David P. Gauthier (2006). Rousseau: The Sentiment of Existence. Cambridge University Press.
    The distinguished philosopher David Gauthier examines Rousseau's evolving notion of freedom, particularly in his later works, where he focuses on a single quest: Can freedom and the independent self be regained? Rousseau's first answer is given in Emile, where he seeks to create a self-sufficient individual, neither materially nor psychologically enslaved to others. His second answer comes in the Social Contract, where he seeks to create a citizen who identifies totally with his community, so that he experiences his dependence on (...)
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  11. Robert Ginsberg (1974). Kant and Hobbes on the Social Contract. Southwestern Journal of Philosophy 5 (1):115-119.
  12. E. A. Goerner (1975). On Patrick Riley's "on Kant as the Most Adequate of the Social Contract Theorists". Political Theory 3 (4):467-468.
  13. Everett W. Hall (1957). II. Justice as Fairness: A Modernized Version of the Social Contract. Journal of Philosophy 54 (22):662-670.
  14. Jean Hampton (1980). Contracts and Choices: Does Rawls Have a Social Contract Theory? Journal of Philosophy 77 (6):315-338.
  15. Adam Hosein (2013). Contractualism, Politics, and Morality. Acta Analytica 28 (4):495-508.
    Rawls developed a contractualist theory of social justice and Scanlon attempted to extend the Rawlsian framework to develop a theory of rightness, or morality more generally. I argue that there are some good reasons to adopt a contractualist theory of social justice, but that it is a mistake to adopt a contractualist theory of rightness. I begin by illustrating the major shared features of Scanlon and Rawls’ theories. I then show that the justification for these features in Rawls’ theory, the (...)
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  16. Michael Howard (2008). Justice and the Social Contract: Essays on Rawlsian Political Philosophy - by Samuel Freeman. Philosophical Books 49 (1):81-83.
  17. Jacob T. Levy (2009). Not So Novus an Ordo: Constitutions Without Social Contracts. Political Theory 37 (2):191 - 217.
    Social contract theory imagines political societies as resting on a fundamental agreement, adopted at a discrete moment in hypothetical time, that binds individual persons together into a polity and sets fundamental rules regarding that polity's structure and powers. Written constitutions, adopted at real moments in historical time, dictating governmental structures, bounding governmental powers, and entrenching individual rights, look temptingly like social contracts reified. Yet something essential is lost in this slippage between social contract theory and the practice of constitutionalism. Contractarian (...)
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  18. Thaddeus Metz (1998). Reason, Politics, and Contractualism. Inquiry 18 (1):61-72.
  19. Nenad Miscevic (2013). In Search of the Reason and the Right—Rousseau's Social Contract as a Thought Experiment. Acta Analytica 28 (4):509-526.
    For Rousseau, social contract is a hypothetical one; the paper claims that it is, in contemporary terms, a political thought-experiment (TE). The abductive way of thinking, looking for the best normative pattern in the data, finds its counterpart in the historical abduction in the Second Discourse; the analogy between the two secures the methodological unity of Rousseau’s political philosophy. The proposed reading of the work as a TE shows that it fulfills the necessary requirements put by (hopefully) intuitively acceptable definition (...)
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  20. Stephen Mulhall (1994). Perfectionism, Politics and the Social Contract: Rawls and Cavell on Justice. Journal of Political Philosophy 2 (3):222–239.
  21. Henry S. Richardson (2006). Rawlsian Social-Contract Theory and the Severely Disabled. Journal of Ethics 10 (4):419 - 462.
    Martha Nussbaum has powerfully argued in Frontiers ofJustice and elsewhere that John Rawls’s sort of social-contract theory cannot usefully be deployed to deal with issues pertaining to justice for the disabled. To counter this claim, this article deploys Rawls’s sort of social-contract theory in order to deal with issues pertaining to justice for the disabled—or, since, as Nussbaum stresses, we all have some degree of disability—for the severely disabled. In this way, rather than questioning one by one Nussbaum’s interpretive claims (...)
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  22. Patrick Riley (1973). On Kant as the Most Adequate of the Social Contract Theorists. Political Theory 1 (4):450-471.
  23. Vernon Thomas Sarver (1997). Kant's Purported Social Contract and the Death Penalty. Journal of Value Inquiry 31 (4):455-472.
  24. Judith N. Shklar (1983). Book Review:Rousseau's Social Contract: A Conceptual Analysis. John B. Noone, Jr. [REVIEW] Ethics 93 (2):405-.
  25. Matthew Simpson (2006). A Paradox of Sovereignty in Rousseau's Social Contract. Journal of Moral Philosophy 3 (1):45-56.
    One unique part of Rousseau's Social Contract is his argument that a just society must have a specific constitutional arrangement of powers centred around what he calls the Sovereign and the Prince. This makes his philosophy different from other contractualists, such as Hobbes and Locke, who think that the principles of good government are compatible with any number of institutional structures. Rousseau's constitutional theory is thus significant in a way that has no parallel in Hobbes or Locke. More to the (...)
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  26. Matthew Simpson (2005). Routledge Philosophy Guidebook to Rousseau and The Social Contract (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 43 (3):364-364.
  27. Paul Weithman (2007). Review of Samuel Freeman, Justice and the Social Contract: Essays on Rawlsian Political Philosophy. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2007 (7).
  28. Enrico Zoffoli (2012). The Place of Comprehensive Doctrines in Political Liberalism: On Some Common Misgivings About the Subject and Function of the Overlapping Consensus. Res Publica 18 (4):351-366.
    In this paper I argue that Rawlsians have largely misunderstood the idea of an overlapping consensus of reasonable comprehensive doctrines, thereby failing to delineate in an appropriate way the place of comprehensive doctrines in political liberalism. My argument rests on two core claims. The first claim is that (i) political liberalism is committed to three theses about the overlapping consensus. The first thesis concerns the subject of the overlapping consensus; the second thesis concerns the function of the overlapping consensus; the (...)
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