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Summary Everything concerning creation that does not fit into the sibling categories. In particular you find here texts about what kinds of divine actions there are and about the difference between God's sustaining and God's other creating activity. Texts about divine action may be here oder in “Divine Attributes, Misc.” or in “Miracles, Misc”.
Key works Swinburne 1993 spells out what it means that God is a person who can act and is omnipotent. Plantinga 2011 defends some traditional Christian views about creation, Ruse 2012 defends atheistic evolution. Russell et al 2002 (as well as the other 4 volumes of this series) and Shults et al 2009, whose authors are linked to the ‘Divine Action Project’ DAP, spell out creation on the assumption that God never intervenes.
Introductions  Pennock & Ruse 2009
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  1. William P. Alston (1994). Divine Action: Shadow or Substance? In Thomas F. Tracy (ed.), The God Who Acts: Philosophical and Theological Explorations. Pennsylvania State University Press. 41-62.
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  2. William P. Alston (1993). Divine Action, Human Freedom, and the Laws of Nature. In R. J. Russell, N. Murphy & C. J. Isham (eds.), Quantum Cosmology and the Laws of Nature: Scientific Perspectives on Divine Action. Vatican Observatory. 185-206.
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  3. William P. Alston (1990). How to Think About Divine Action. In B. Hebblethwaite & E. Henderson (eds.), Divine Action. T Clark. 51-70.
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  4. William P. Alston (1988). Divine and Human Action. In Divine Nature and Human Language: Essays in Philosophical Theology. Cornell Up. 81-102.
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  5. William P. Alston (1986). God's Action in the World. In Divine Nature and Human Language: Essays in Philosophical Theology. Cornell Up, 1989. 197-222.
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  6. Grzegorz Bugajak & Jacek Tomczyk (2009). Human Origins: Continuous Evolution Versus Punctual Creation. In Pranab Das (ed.), Global Perspectives on Science and Spirituality. Templeton Press. 143–164.
    One of the particular problems in the debate between science and theology regarding human origins seems to be an apparent controversy between the continuous character of evolutionary processes leading to the origin of Homo sapiens and the punctual understanding of the act of creation of man seen as taking place in a moment in time. The paper elaborates scientific arguments for continuity or discontinuity of evolution, and what follows, for the existence or nonexistence of a clear borderline between our species (...)
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  7. Mark Cauchi (2009). Deconstruction and Creation: An Augustinian Deconstruction of Derrida. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 66 (1):15 - 32.
    In recent continental philosophy of religion there has been significant attention paid to the Abrahamic doctrines of creation ex nihilo and divine omnipotence, especially by deconstructive thinkers such as Derrida, Caputo, and Keller. For these thinkers, the doctrine represents a form of agency that does violence to various forms of alterity. While broadly supportive of their fundamental philosophical and ethico-political views, especially about the primordiality of alterity, I differ from them in that I argue that creation ex nihilo articulates the (...)
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  8. Caleb Cohoe (2014). God, Causality, and Petitionary Prayer. Faith and Philosophy 31 (1):24-45.
    Many maintain that petitionary prayer is pointless. I argue that the theist can defend petitionary prayer by giving a general account of how divine and creaturely causation can be compatible and complementary, based on the claim that the goodness of something depends on its cause. I use Thomas Aquinas’s metaphysical framework to give an account that explains why a world with creaturely causation better reflects God’s goodness than a world in which God brought all things about immediately. In such a (...)
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  9. William Lane Craig (1998). Creation, Providence and Miracles. In Brian Davies (ed.), Philosophy of Religion. Georgetown Univ Pr. 136-162.
    Creation and conservation are defined and distinguished; providence based on divine middle knowledge is defended; and miracles as naturally impossible events are defended.
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  10. Drew M. Dalton (2006). The Pains of Contraction Understanding Creation in Levinas Through Schelling. Studia Phaenomenologica 6 (1):215 - 240.
    There is an apparent contradiction within Levinas’s work: on the one hand, Levinas upholds an account of existence that seemingly requires a creation narrative, while maintaining, on the other hand, that an account of the ethical import of that existence needs no recourse to the divine. This seeming contradiction results from a fundamental misunderstanding concerning Levinas’s account of creation and its logical consequences concerning the divine. This paper aims to clarify this misunderstanding by exploring the similarities between and influence of (...)
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  11. Pirooz Fatoorchi (2010). Four Conceptions of Creatio Ex Nihilo and the Compatibility Questions. In David B. Burrell, Carlo Cogliati, Janet M. Soskice & William R. Stoeger (eds.), Creation and the God of Abraham. Cambridge University Press.
    The notion of creatio ex nihilo has become a doctrine firmly established in the three Abrahamic religions (i.e., Christianity, Judaism and Islam). Almost all groups of Islamic thinkers accept the truth of the createdness (creatio) of the universe, and that it is preceded by its “non-existence” (ex nihilo). However, there is a diversity of opinions as to whether the concept of creatio ex nihilo is compatible with alternative accounts of the origin of the physical world, and this diversity is particularly (...)
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  12. Philippe Gagnon (2013). Physics in Catholicism in Encyclopedia of Sciences and Religions, Vol 3. Anne Runehov and Lluis Oviedo (Eds.) (Pp. 1718-1729). Springer.
    Outline: The reality of Catholicism; The question of the development of science; Historical outlook at some transitional moments; When dogma meets science; Contemporary physics and the worldview of Catholicism; Awaiting a 'Grand Narrative' and the final vision of harmony.
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  13. Philippe Gagnon (2012). Review of Yves Tourenne, Introduction à la Métaphysique de Claude Tresmontant. Pour Une Recherche d'Articulation Entre Sciences Expérimentales, Métaphysique, Pensée de l'Église Et Mystique Chrétienne Orthodoxe. [REVIEW] Science Et Esprit 64 (2):304-309.
  14. Philippe Gagnon (2003). Malebranche Et Berkeley: Les Créatures Et les Raisons Éternelles. Bulletin de la Société de Philosophie du Québec 29 (2):15-16.
  15. Philippe Gagnon (2002). Temporalité de la Genèse Chez Maurice Blondel Et Pierre Teilhard de Chardin. Esquisse D’Un Rapprochement. Science Et Esprit 54 (1):75-95.
    Teilhard has never given up on permanence behind change, whereas Blondel, although interested by permanence, presents a very keen consciousness of irreversibility. Blondel attempts to construct an ontology that integrates this fact of change or becoming. Would this have satisfied Teilhard? Blondel develops a "logic of moral life" insisting on the initial option right to the end of our destiny. Teilhard develops a consciousness of time with a direct hold on a world apprehended first by the senses, whereas Blondel is (...)
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  16. Klaas J. Kraay (2011). Incommensurability, Incomparability, and God's Choice of a World. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 69 (2):91 - 102.
    Anselmian theism holds that there necessarily exists a being, God, who is essentially unsurpassable in power, knowledge, goodness, and wisdom. This being is also understood to be the creator and sustainer of all that is. In contemporary analytic philosophy of religion, this role is generally understood as follows: God surveys the array of possible worlds, and in his wisdom selects exactly one for actualization, based on its axiological properties. In this paper, I discuss an under-appreciated challenge for this account of (...)
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  17. Jonathan Kvanvig, Creation and Conservation. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  18. Jonathan L. Kvanvig (2011). Destiny and Deliberation: Essays in Philosophical Theology. Oxford University Press.
    Instead, it is a theory of what one should do, and assesses decisions based on probabilities and utilities. ... Adopting the plan of applying modern decision theory to one's choices might have lower expected utility than using other ...
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  19. David Vander Laan (2006). Persistence and Divine Conservation. Religious Studies 42 (2):159-176.
    Plausibly, if an object persists through time, then its later existence must be caused by its earlier existence. Many theists endorse a theory of continuous creation, according to which God is the sole cause of a creature's existence at a given time. The conjunction of these two theses rather unfortunately implies that no object distinct from God persists at all. What strategies for resolving this difficulty are available? (Published Online April 7 2006).
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  20. Timothy O'Connor (1999). Simplicity and Creation. Faith and Philosophy 16 (3):405-412.
    According to many philosophical theologians, God is metaphysically simple: there is no real distinction among His attributes or even between attribute and existence itself. Here, I consider only one argument against the simplicity thesis. Its proponents claim that simplicity is incompatible with God's having created another world, since simplicity entails that God is unchanging across possible worlds. For, they argue, different acts of creation involve different willings, which are distinct intrinsic states. I show that this is mistaken, by sketching (...)
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  21. Mark Ian Thomas Robson (2008). Ontology and Providence in Creation: Taking Ex Nihilo Seriously. Continuum.
    My concern is to overturn the Leibnizean model of God's creation of the world which proposes that God selected a possible world out of a whole host of other alternative ones. This is the familiar possible worlds model of creation. I argue that this understanding of creation does not take seriously the idea of ex nihilo and that, rather than considering determinate possible worlds, we should understand possibility as indeterminate. I then develop this argument and explores how it impacts on (...)
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  22. James F. Ross (1980). Creation. Journal of Philosophy 77 (10):614-629.
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  23. R. J. Russell, Philip Clayton, Kirk Wegter-McNelly & John Polkinghorne (eds.) (2002). Quantum Mechanics: Scientific Perspectives on Divine Action 5. Vatican Observatory Publications.
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  24. Thomas D. Senor (1993). Divine Temporality and Creation Ex Nihilo. Faith and Philosophy 10 (1):86-92.
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  25. Jesse R. Steinberg (2007). Leibniz, Creation and the Best of All Possible Worlds. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 62 (3):123 - 133.
    Leibniz argued that God would not create a world unless it was the best possible world. I defend Leibniz’s argument. I then consider whether God could refrain from creating if there were no best possible world. I argue that God, on pain of contradiction, could not refrain from creating in such a situation. I conclude that either this is the best possible world or God is not our creator.
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  26. Jitse M. van der Meer (ed.) (1996). Interpreting God's Action in the World. Up of America.
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  27. Daniel von Wachter (2005). Göttliche Kreativität: Die vielen Weisen, auf die Gott Ereignisse geschehen lassen könnte. In G. Abel (ed.), Kreativität, Band 1. Universitã¤Tsverlag der Tu Berlin. 245-253, http://epub.ub.uni-muen.
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