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  1. Robert & Lance Hannon, PhD. (2011). Engaging the U.S. Bishops' Pastoral on Crime and Criminal Justice. Journal of Catholic Social Thought 8 (1):77-91.
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  2. Francis Kofi Abiew (2010). Humanitarian Intervention and the Responsibility to Protect: Redefining a Role for “Kind-Hearted Gunmen”. Criminal Justice Ethics 29 (2):93-109.
  3. David M. Adams (2005). Punishing Hate and Achieving Equality. Criminal Justice Ethics 24 (1):19-30.
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  4. Larry Alexander (2013). Causing the Conditions of One's Defense: A Theoretical Non-Problem. [REVIEW] Criminal Law and Philosophy 7 (3):623-628.
    My contribution to this symposium is short and negative: There are no theoretical problems that attach to one’s causing the conditions that permit him to claim a defense to some otherwise criminal act. If one assesses the culpability of an actor at each of the various times he acts in a course of conduct, then it is obvious that he can be nonculpable at T2 but culpable at T1, and that a nonculpable act at T2 has no bearing on whether (...)
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  5. Larry Alexander (2013). You Got What You Deserved. Criminal Law and Philosophy 7 (2):309-319.
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  6. Larry Alexander (2009). Facts, Law, Exculpation, and Inculpation: Comments on Simons. Criminal Law and Philosophy 3 (3):241-245.
    Orthodox criminal law doctrine treats mistakes of law and mistakes of fact differently for purposes of both exculpation and inculpation. Kenneth Simons’ paper in general defends this orthodoxy. I have earlier criticized the criminal law’s attempt to distinguish mistakes of law from mistakes of fact, and I continue to maintain, in opposition to Simons, that the distinction is problematic.
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  7. Larry Alexander (1992). The ADL Hate Crime Statute and the First Amendment. Criminal Justice Ethics 11 (2):49-51.
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  8. Larry Alexander (1992). Voluntary Acts: The Child/Davidson Trilemma. Criminal Justice Ethics 11 (2):98-99.
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  9. Larry Alexander (1986). Consent, Punishment, and Proportionality. Philosophy and Public Affairs 15 (2):178-182.
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  10. Larry Alexander & Kimberly Kessler Ferzan (2012). Ferzander's Surrebuttal. Criminal Law and Philosophy 6 (3):463-465.
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  11. Larry Alexander & Kimberly Kessler Ferzan (2012). Iconoclasts? Who, Us? A Reply to Dolinko. Criminal Law and Philosophy 6 (2):281-287.
    Iconoclasts? Who, Us? A Reply to Dolinko Content Type Journal Article Category Original Paper Pages 1-7 DOI 10.1007/s11572-012-9143-3 Authors Larry Alexander, San Diego, CA, USA Kimberly Kessler Ferzan, Camden, NJ, USA Journal Criminal Law and Philosophy Online ISSN 1871-9805 Print ISSN 1871-9791.
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  12. Larry Alexander & Kimberly Kessler Ferzan (2012). “Moore or Less” Causation and Responsibility. Criminal Law and Philosophy 6 (1):81-92.
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  13. Daniele Alge (2013). The Effectiveness of Incentives to Reduce the Risk of Moral Hazard in the Defence Barrister's Role in Plea Bargaining. Legal Ethics 16 (1):162-181.
    Previous research has identified several factors (such as remuneration, workload, negative perceptions of criminal defendants) which may lead to a barrister not acting in the defendant's best interests, when advising on plea or engaging in plea bargaining. This article applies aspects of the principal – agent problem to the relationship between defence barristers and defendants in England and Wales in order to analyse the extent to which incentives can align the interests of the agent (the barrister) with those of the (...)
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  14. Lucy Allais (2012). Restorative Justice, Retributive Justice, and the South African Truth and Reconciliation Commission. Philosophy and Public Affairs 39 (4):331-363.
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  15. Peter Alldridge (2001). [Book Review] Relocating Criminal Law. [REVIEW] Criminal Justice Ethics 20 (2):55-62.
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  16. Geoffrey P. Alpert (2006). Review Essay / Investigating the Investigators: Social Science and the Police. Criminal Justice Ethics 25 (1):39-43.
    Robert Jackall, Street Stories: The World of Police Detectives. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2005. 429pp.
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  17. Andrew Altman & Steven Lee (1983). Legal Entrapment. Philosophy and Public Affairs 12 (1):51-69.
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  18. Judith Andre (1986). Review Essay / Regulating Offensive Acts. Criminal Justice Ethics 5 (2):54-59.
    Joel Feinberg, Offense to Others New York: Oxford University Press, 1985, xix + 328 pp.
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  19. George Andreopoulos & Leonid Lantsman (2010). The Evolving Discourse on Human Protection. Criminal Justice Ethics 29 (2):73-92.
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  20. David Andress, Tara Wildes, Dianne Rechtine & Kenneth P. Moritsugu (2004). Jails, Prisons, and Your Community's Health. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 32 (s4):50-51.
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  21. Audrey L. Anton (2006). Breaking the Habit. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 13 (2):58-66.
  22. Jacob Appel (2012). Castration Anxiety. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 9 (1):85-91.
    Chemical castration laws, such as one recently adopted in the U.S. State of Louisiana, raise challenging ethical concerns for physicians. Even if such interventions were to prove efficacious, which is far from certain, they would still raise troubling concerns regarding the degree of medical risk that may be imposed upon prisoners in the name of public safety as well as the appropriate role for physicians and other health care professionals in the administration of pharmaceuticals to competent prisoners over the inmates’ (...)
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  23. David Archard (2008). Disgust, Offensiveness and the Law. Journal of Applied Philosophy 25 (4):314-321.
    abstract Martha Nussbaum's concern is to limit the role that emotions can legitimately play in the definition of the criminal law. She would allow nuisance laws to curtail the occasioning of disgust but only disgust of a certain kind. Problems arise for her account when she extends this analysis to the prevention of offensiveness. Unavoidable is an evaluation of those beliefs subscription to which explains the taking of offence. Hence the principal problem for a liberalism of the kind Nussbaum defends (...)
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  24. Richard J. Arneson (2013). The Enforcement of Morals Revisited. Criminal Law and Philosophy 7 (3):435-454.
    Against Patrick Devlin, H. L. A. Hart rejects the enforcement of morals as such. Hart defends an expanded version of John Stuart Mill’s harm principle, but this expanded version is no more defensible than Mill’s original claim. Hart’s discussion fails to clarify what is really at stake in controversies regarding the moral acceptability of criminal prohibition of such activities as suicide and assisted suicide, recreational drug use, prostitution, and so on. Regarding the enforcement of morals as such, we should acknowledge (...)
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  25. Andrew Ashworth (2011). The Unfairness of Risk-Based Possession Offences. Criminal Law and Philosophy 5 (3):237-257.
    This is a study of possession offences, with the focus on those intended to penalise the risk of a serious harm. Offences of this kind are examined in the light of basic doctrines of the criminal law, and in the light of the proper limits of endangerment offences. They are found wanting in both respects, and are also found to pose particular sentencing problems. The conclusion is that many risk-based possession offences are unfair, save those that require proof of a (...)
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  26. Andrew J. Ashworth (1994). Justifying the Grounds of Mitigation. Criminal Justice Ethics 13 (1):5-10.
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  27. Andrew Ashworth & Meredith Blake (2004). Ethics and the Criminal Defence Lawyer. Legal Ethics 7 (2):167-189.
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  28. Mirko Bagaric (2010). The Right to an Impartial Hearing Trumps the Social Imperative of Bringing Accused to Trial Even 'Down Under'. Criminal Law and Philosophy 4 (3):321-339.
    Accused persons who are subjected to a saturation level of negative media coverage may be denied an impartial hearing, which is perhaps the most important aspect of the right to a fair hearing. Despite this, the courts have generally held that the social imperative of prosecuting accused trumps the interests of the accused. The justification for an impartial hearing stems from the repugnance of convicting the innocent. Viewed dispassionately, this imperative is not absolute, given that every legal system condones (...)
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  29. Dennis Baker (2009). Collective Criminalization and the Constitutional Right to Endanger Others. Criminal Justice Ethics 28 (2):168-200.
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  30. Lynne Rudder Baker (1991). [Book Review] Saving Belief, a Critique of Physicalism. [REVIEW] Criminal Justice Ethics 10:27-40.
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  31. Stephen W. Ball (1984). Bibliographical Essay / Legal Positivism, Natural Law, and the Hart/Dworkin Debate. Criminal Justice Ethics 3 (2):68-85.
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  32. Melissa Ballengee (1999). Bajakajian: New Hope for Escaping Excessive Fines Under the Civil False Claims Act. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 27 (4):366-379.
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  33. Randy E. Barnett (2000). [Book Review] the Structure of Liberty, Justice and the Rule of Law. [REVIEW] Criminal Justice Ethics 19 (2).
    This provocative book outlines a powerful and original theory of liberty structured by the liberal conception of justice and the rule of law. Drawing on insights from philosophy, political theory, economics, and law, he shows how this new conception of liberty can confront, and solve, the central societal problems of knowledge, interest, and power.
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  34. Randy E. Barnett (1986). Pursuing Justice in a Free Society: Part Two—Crime Prevention and the Legal Order. Criminal Justice Ethics 5 (1):30-53.
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  35. Randy E. Barnett (1985). Pursuing Justice in a Free Society: Part One—Power Vs. Liberty. Criminal Justice Ethics 4 (2):50-72.
    The problem of pursuing and achieving justice in a free society involves three different areas of analysis. First, the types of acts that are to be proscribed must be specified. Part of this analysis is methodological, requiring us to settle on the way in which such questions are to be decided. Second, once an offense has been defined, the remedy for its commission must be determined in a manner that is consistent with the theory of justice that defined the criminal (...)
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  36. Marcia Baron (2006). Excuses, Excuses. Criminal Law and Philosophy 1 (1):21-39.
    Justifications and excuses are defenses that exculpate. They are therefore much more like each other than like such defenses as diplomatic immunity, which does not exculpate. But they exculpate in different ways, and it has proven difficult to agree on just what that difference consists in. In this paper I take a step back from justification and excuse as concepts in criminal law, and look at the concepts as they arise in everyday life. To keep the task manageable, I focus (...)
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  37. Charles Barton (2000). Getting Even Again. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 14 (1):129-142.
    In his review of Getting Even: Revenge as a Form of Justice (Open Court: Chicago. 1999). Michael Davis challenges the view put forward in the book that revenge is personal retributive punishment. Davis also claims that “the purpose Barton seeks to achieve under the banner of ‘victims rights’ has no more to do with punishment than with revenge.” In my response, I argue that Davis’s views and conclusions are based partly on a misreading of Getting Even, and partly on mistaken (...)
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  38. Charles Barton (1999). Empowerment and Retribution in Criminal Justice. Professional Ethics 7 (3/4):111-135.
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  39. Charles K. B. Barton (2003). Restorative Justice: The Empowerment Model. Hawkins Press.
    There will also be two sample role plays in the book and additionally there will be four complete role plays available on our website, closer to publication ...
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  40. Charles K. B. Barton (2001). Victim-Offender and Community Empowerment. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 15 (1):25-46.
    With the growing prominence of restorative justice interventions, criminal justice is being reconceptualized in terms of a new paradigm of justice. The central concept of this new paradigm is victim-offender empowerment. The paper articulates the meaning and application of this idea in restorative justice philosophy and practice.
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  41. Michael Bavidge (1984). Gross Depravity and Moral Seriousness. Journal of Applied Philosophy 1 (1):53-61.
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  42. Alan Bayless (1983). Paying a Murderer for Evidence. Criminal Justice Ethics 2 (2):47-48.
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  43. Allyson Behm (2000). Fraud and Abuse: United States Ex Rel Merena V. SmithKline Beecham Corp.;1 United States Ex Rel Spear V. SmithKline Beecham Clinical Lab.;2 United States Ex Rel Grossenbacher V. SmithKline Beecham Clinical Lab. [REVIEW] Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 28 (2):191-192.
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  44. Raymond A. Belliotti (1986). Gloom and Doom. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 3 (1):43-57.
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  45. Christopher Bennett (2009). L. Zaibert, Punishment and Retribution. Criminal Law and Philosophy 4 (1):105-107.
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  46. Christopher Bennett (2008). The Apology Ritual: A Philosophical Theory of Punishment. Cambridge University Press.
    Christopher Bennett presents a theory of punishment grounded in the practice of apology, and in particular in reactions such as feeling sorry and making amends. He argues that offenders have a 'right to be punished' - that it is part of taking an offender seriously as a member of a normatively demanding relationship (such as friendship or collegiality or citizenship) that she is subject to retributive attitudes when she violates the demands of that relationship. However, while he claims that punishment (...)
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  47. Vera Bergelson (2013). R. A. Duff, Lindsay Farmer, S. E. Marshall, Massimo Renzo, and Victor Tadros: The Boundaries of the Criminal Law. [REVIEW] Criminal Law and Philosophy 7 (2):383-387.
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  48. Vera Bergelson (2012). Choice of Evils: In Search of a Viable Rationale. Criminal Law and Philosophy 6 (3):289-305.
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  49. Vera Bergelson (2009). The Case of Weak Will and Wayward Desire. Criminal Law and Philosophy 3 (1):19-28.
    In this article, I confront Garvey’s argument that a weak-willed individual deserves partial excuse for trying to resist a strong desire that pushes him toward commission of a criminal act even though in the end he unreasonably abandons his resistance and commits the crime. I attempt to refute Garvey’s argument on two counts: one, I question whether the law should indeed provide mitigation to such an offender; and two, I argue that, even if it should, this mitigation may not come (...)
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  50. Margaret A. Berger (2006). The Impact of DNA Exonerations on the Criminal Justice System. Journal of Law, Medicine Ethics 34 (2):320-327.
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