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Criminal Law

Edited by Gustavo Beade (Universidad de Buenos Aires (UBA), Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel)
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  1. Mohamad Al-Hakim (2010). Making Room for Hate Crime Legislation in Liberal Societies. Criminal Law and Philosophy 4 (3):341-358.
    There is a divide within political and legal theory concerning the justification of hate-crime legislation in liberal states. Opponents of Hate-Crime Legislation have recently argued that enhanced punishment for hate-motivated crimes cannot be justified within political liberal states. More specifically, Heidi Hurd argues that criminal sanction which target character dispositions unfairly target individuals for characteristics not readily under their control. She further argues that a ‘character’ based approach in criminal law is necessarily illiberal and violates the state’s commitment to political (...)
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  2. Larry Alexander (2013). Can Self-Defense Justify Punishment? Law and Philosophy 32 (2-3):159-175.
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  3. Larry Alexander (2013). Causing the Conditions of One's Defense: A Theoretical Non-Problem. [REVIEW] Criminal Law and Philosophy 7 (3):623-628.
    My contribution to this symposium is short and negative: There are no theoretical problems that attach to one’s causing the conditions that permit him to claim a defense to some otherwise criminal act. If one assesses the culpability of an actor at each of the various times he acts in a course of conduct, then it is obvious that he can be nonculpable at T2 but culpable at T1, and that a nonculpable act at T2 has no bearing on whether (...)
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  4. Larry Alexander (2013). You Got What You Deserved. Criminal Law and Philosophy 7 (2):309-319.
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  5. Larry Alexander (2011). Duff on Attempts. In Rowan Cruft, Matthew H. Kramer & Mark R. Reiff (eds.), Crime, Punishment, and Responsibility: The Jurisprudence of Antony Duff. Oup Oxford.
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  6. Larry Alexander (2009). Facts, Law, Exculpation, and Inculpation: Comments on Simons. Criminal Law and Philosophy 3 (3):241-245.
    Orthodox criminal law doctrine treats mistakes of law and mistakes of fact differently for purposes of both exculpation and inculpation. Kenneth Simons’ paper in general defends this orthodoxy. I have earlier criticized the criminal law’s attempt to distinguish mistakes of law from mistakes of fact, and I continue to maintain, in opposition to Simons, that the distinction is problematic.
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  7. Larry Alexander (1993). Self-Defense, Justification and Excuse. Philosophy and Public Affairs 22 (1):53-66.
  8. Larry Alexander & Kimberly Kessler Ferzan (2012). Iconoclasts? Who, Us? A Reply to Dolinko. Criminal Law and Philosophy 6 (2):281-287.
    Iconoclasts? Who, Us? A Reply to Dolinko Content Type Journal Article Category Original Paper Pages 1-7 DOI 10.1007/s11572-012-9143-3 Authors Larry Alexander, San Diego, CA, USA Kimberly Kessler Ferzan, Camden, NJ, USA Journal Criminal Law and Philosophy Online ISSN 1871-9805 Print ISSN 1871-9791.
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  9. Daniele Alge (2013). The Effectiveness of Incentives to Reduce the Risk of Moral Hazard in the Defence Barrister's Role in Plea Bargaining. Legal Ethics 16 (1):162-181.
    Previous research has identified several factors (such as remuneration, workload, negative perceptions of criminal defendants) which may lead to a barrister not acting in the defendant's best interests, when advising on plea or engaging in plea bargaining. This article applies aspects of the principal – agent problem to the relationship between defence barristers and defendants in England and Wales in order to analyse the extent to which incentives can align the interests of the agent (the barrister) with those of the (...)
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  10. Marta García Alonso (2007). El control protestante de la transgresión moral.¿ Disciplina o derecho? Anales de la Cátedra Francisco Suárez 41:89-105.
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  11. Kai Ambos (2013). Punishment Without a Sovereign? The Ius Puniendi Issue of International Criminal Law: A First Contribution Towards a Consistent Theory of International Criminal Law. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 33 (2):293-315.
    Current International Criminal Law (ICL) suffers from at least four fairly serious theoretical shortcomings. First, as a starting point, the concept and meaning of ICL in its different variations must be clarified (‘the concept and meaning issue’). Second, the question of whether and how punitive power can exist at the supranational level without a sovereign (‘the ius puniendi issue’) must be answered in a satisfactory manner. Third, the overall function or purpose of ICL as opposed to national criminal law (‘the (...)
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  12. Sŏng-jo An (2011). Hyŏndae Hyŏngpŏphak: Iron Kwa Pangbŏp. Kyŏngin Munhwasa.
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  13. Jami Lynn Anderson (1995). Annulling Crimes: A Hegelian Theory of Retribution. Dissertation, University of Southern California
    Retributivists claim that those who deliberately and freely commit crimes deserve punishment proportionate to their crime. But Marx famously claimed that many criminals commit crimes because of social circumstances like abject poverty and therefore their punishment is unjust. ;I begin by outlining the retributivistic theory dominant in contemporary philosophical and legal literature, retributivism founded on social contractarianism. Such a theory has two strategies available to it to meet the Marxist's challenge: either claim that poverty denies persons the opportunity to enjoy (...)
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  14. Manuel Da Costa Andrade (1991). Consentimento E Acordo Em Direito Penal.
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  15. K. A. Anele (2007). The Criminal Justice System and Ordeal of Victims of Crime in Nigeria: A Preliminary Observation. Sophia: An African Journal of Philosophy 8 (2).
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  16. Peter Asp, Christopher Bennett, Peter Cave, J. Angelo Corlett, Richard Dagger, Michael Davis, Anthony Ellis, Thomas S. Petersen, Julian V. Roberts & Torbjörn Tännsjö (2011). Recidivist Punishments: The Philosopher's View. Lexington Books.
    Much has been written about recidivist punishments, particularly within the area of criminology. However there is a notorious lack of penal philosophical reflection on this issue. This book attempts to fill that gap by presenting the philosopher’s view on this matter as a way of furthering the debate on recidivist punishments.
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  17. D. Sherwin Bailey (1961). Public Morality and the Criminal Law. The Eugenics Review 52 (4):201.
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  18. Suixian Bao & Gechang Ma (1995). Xing Fa Xue Yan Jiu Xin Shi Ye.
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  19. Harry Elmer Barnes (1934). The Story of Punishment. The Monist 44:151.
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  20. Peter Brian Barry (2015). Capital Punishment as a Response to Evil. Criminal Law and Philosophy 9 (2):245-264.
    Some jurisdictions acknowledge, as a matter of positive law, the relevance of evil to capital punishment. At one point, the state of Florida counted that the fact that a murderer’s crime was “especially wicked, evil, atrocious or cruel” as an aggravating factor for purposes of capital sentencing. I submit that Florida may be onto something. I consider a thesis about capital punishment that strikes me as plausible on its face: if capital punishment is ever morally permissible, it is permissible as (...)
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  21. Danilo Basta (2004). La Justicia Penal En Kant. Endoxa 18:283-295.
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  22. Marcus Bastelberger (2006). Die Legitimität des Strafrechts Und der Moralische Staat: Utilitaristische Und Retributivistische Strafrechtsbegründung Und Die Rechtliche Verfassung der Freiheit. Lang.
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  23. Richard A. Bauman (1996). Crime and Punishment in Ancient Rome.
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  24. Saba Bazargan (2013). Proportionality, Territorial Occupation, and Enabled Terrorism. Law and Philosophy 32 (4):435-457.
    Some collateral harms affecting enemy civilians during a war are agentially mediated – for example, the US-led invasion of Iraq in 2003 sparked an insurgency which killed thousands of Iraqi civilians. I call these ‘collaterally enabled harms.’ Intuitively, we ought to discount the weight that these harms receive in the ‘costs’ column of our ad bellum proportionality calculation. But I argue that an occupying military force with de facto political authority has a special obligation to provide minimal protection to the (...)
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  25. Gordon Bazemore (2007). The Expansion of Punishment and the Restriction of Justice: Loss of Limits in the Implementation of Retributive Policy. Social Research: An International Quarterly 74 (2):651-662.
    We suggest that a restorative justice critique of current retributive policy and practice may well be a starting point for the development of more just and more effective approaches to sentencing, both formal and informal, and to a more effective approach to reentry for currently incarcerated persons. While restorative justice principles acknowledge the debt owed by offenders to their victims and victimized communities, this is a debt met neither by inflicting harm on the offender nor by removing the offender's rights (...)
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  26. Raymond A. Belliotti (1991). Harmless Wrongdoing: The Moral Limits of the Criminal Law, Vol. 4. [REVIEW] International Studies in Philosophy 23 (3):108-109.
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  27. Christopher Bennett (2013). Considering Capital Punishment as a Human Interaction. Criminal Law and Philosophy 7 (2):367-382.
    This paper contributes to the normative debate over capital punishment by looking at whether the role of executioner is one in which it is possible and proper to take pride. The answer to the latter question turns on the kind of justification the agent can give for what she does in carrying out the role. So our inquiry concerns whether the justifications available to an executioner could provide him with the kind of justification necessary for him to take pride in (...)
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  28. Geo Benson (1942). Crime and Punishment. The Eugenics Review 33 (4):138.
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  29. Vera Bergelson (2013). R. A. Duff, Lindsay Farmer, S. E. Marshall, Massimo Renzo, and Victor Tadros: The Boundaries of the Criminal Law. [REVIEW] Criminal Law and Philosophy 7 (2):383-387.
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  30. Mitchell N. Berman (2013). Rehabilitating Retributivism. Law and Philosophy 32 (1):83-108.
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  31. H. Bianchi (1966). Ethik des Strafens. Luchterhand.
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  32. C. Binney (1968). Eugenic Aspects of the English Criminal Law. The Eugenics Review 60 (2):118.
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  33. Khālid ibn Saʻūd Bishr (2005). .
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  34. François Blais (1989). Réformisme pénal et reponsabilité : une étude philosophique. Philosophiques 16 (2):293-325.
    Cet article a comme principal objectif d'effectuer un bilan critique de certaines thèses du réformisme pénal . La perspective retenue est celle de la responsabilité dans les différentes constructions théoriques du projet réformiste . Je rendrai compte des thèses respectives sur le sujet et je ferai, en conclusion, certains commentaires critiques sur les difficultés pour ces approches réformistes de la responsabilité d'offrir un point de vue cohérent et moralement acceptable de la question.The main objective of this paper is to criticize (...)
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  35. Michael Blake (1997). International Criminal Adjudication and the Right to Punish. Public Affairs Quarterly 11 (2):203-215.
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  36. G. Blakey (2004). Sentencing Reform, The Federal Criminal Justice System, and Judicial and Prosecutorial Discretion. Notre Dame Journal of Law, Ethics and Public Policy 18 (2):319-328.
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  37. Walter Block (2010). Toward a Libertarian Theory of Guilt and Punishment for the Crime of Statism. Journal of Libertarian Studies 22 (1):665.
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  38. Peter Blume (2007). Rettens Veje Og Vildveje: Et Bidrag Til Retsteorien. Jurist- Og Økonomforbundets Forlag.
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  39. Cecil De Boer (1932). On the Nature of State Action in Punishment. The Monist 42 (4):605 - 626.
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  40. Elisabeth Boetzkes (1992). Robert F. Schopp, Automatism, Insanity, and the Psychology of Criminal Responsibility Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 12 (4):294-296.
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  41. Paulo César Corrêa Borges (ed.) (2012). Leituras de Um Realismo Jurídico-Penal Marginal: Homenagem a Alessandro Baratta. Unesp, Programa de Pós-Graduação Em Direito, Núcleo de Estudos da Tutela Penal E Educação Em Direitos Humanos.
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  42. Andrew Botterell (forthcoming). Reconciling the Principled Approach to Hearsay with the Rule of Law. Supreme Court Law Review.
    My goal in this paper is to argue that the principled approach to hearsay is consistent with the rule of law. I begin by contrasting an instrumental conception of the rule of law with a conception that views the rule of law in primarily normative terms. I then turn my attention to a recent criticism of the Supreme Court of Canada’s principled approach to hearsay and suggest that if Michael Oakeshott’s normative interpretation of the rule of law is adopted, there (...)
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  43. Andrew Botterell (2009). Rethinking Criminal Law. [REVIEW] Canadian Journal of Law and Jurisprudence 22:93-112.
    A review of Larry Laudan, Truth Error and Criminal Law: An Essay in Legal Epistemology (Cambridge University Press, 2006).
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  44. Michael E. Bratman (2013). Yaffe on Criminal Attempts. Legal Theory 19 (2):101-113.
    Central to Gideon Yaffe's powerful theory of the legitimate criminalization of unsuccessful attempts is his according to which, I argue that this principle, taken together with Yaffe's theory of the nature of attempts, threatens to lead to a normatively problematic conclusion in support of the legitimate criminalization of attempts that are merely a matter of thinking and do not involve action in the public space. And I argue that Yaffe's efforts to block this conclusion are themselves problematic. This leads to (...)
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  45. George G. Brenkert (forthcoming). Chapter Three: Product Liability 71. Contemporary Issues in Business Ethics.
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  46. Percy W. Bridgman (1958). Determinism and Punishment. In Sidney Hook (ed.), Determinism and Freedom in the Age of Modern Science. Collier-Macmillan. 143--145.
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  47. David O. Brink (2013). First Acts, Last Acts, and Abandonment. Legal Theory 19 (2):114-123.
    This contribution reconstructs and assesses Gideon Yaffe’s claims in his book Attempts about what constitutes an attempt, what can count as evidence that an attempt has been made, whether abandonment is a genuine defense, and whether attempts should be punished less severely than completed crimes. I contrast Yaffe’s account of being motivated by an intention and the completion of an attempt in terms of the truth of the completion counterfactual with an alternative picture of attempts as temporally extended decision trees (...)
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  48. David O. Brink (2013). Responsibility, Incompetence, and Psychopathy. In The Lindley Lecture. University of Kansas.
    This essay articulates a conception of responsibility and excuse in terms of the fair opportunity to avoid wrongdoing and explores its implications for insanity, incompetence, and psychopathy. The fair opportunity conception factors responsibility into conditions of normative competence and situational control and factors normative competence into cognitive and volitional capacities. This supports a conception of incompetence that recognizes substantial impairment of either cognitive or volitional capacities as excusing, provided the agent is not substantially responsible for her own incompetence. This conception (...)
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  49. David O. Brink (2012). Retributivism and Legal Moralism. Ratio Juris 25 (4):496-512.
    This article examines whether a retributivist conception of punishment implies legal moralism and asks what liberalism implies about retributivism and moralism. It makes a case for accepting the weak retributivist thesis that culpable wrongdoing creates a pro tanto case for blame and punishment and the weak moralist claim that moral wrongdoing creates a pro tanto case for legal regulation. This weak moralist claim is compatible with the liberal claim that the legal enforcement of morality is rarely all‐thing‐considered desirable. Though weak (...)
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  50. Kimberley Brownlee (2013). Digging Up, Dismantling, and Redesigning the Criminal Law. Criminal Law and Philosophy 7 (1):169-178.
    The criminal law raises wonderfully thorny foundational questions. Some of these questions are conceptual: What is a plausible conception of crime ? What is a plausible conception of criminal law ? Some of these questions are genealogical: What are the historical and genealogical roots of the criminal law in a particular jurisdiction? Other questions are evaluative: What are the political and moral values on which a given conception of criminal law depends? What kind of rational reconstruction, if any, could the (...)
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