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  1. Alison Bailey & Jacquelyn Zita (2007). The Reproduction of Whiteness: Race and the Regulation of the Gendered Body. Hypatia 22 (2):vii-xv.
    Historically critical reflection on whiteness in the United States has been a long-standing practice in slave folklore and in Mexican resistance to colonialism, Asian American struggles against exploitation and containment, and Native American stories of contact with European colonizers. Drawing from this legacy and from the disturbing silence on “whiteness” in postsecondary institutions, critical whiteness scholarship has emerged in the past two decades in U.S. academies in a variety of disciplines. A small number of philosophers, critical race theorists, postcolonial theorists, (...)
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  2. Lawrie Balfour (2005). Representative Women: Slavery, Citizenship, and Feminist Theory in Du Bois's “Damnation of Women”. Hypatia 20 (3):127-148.
  3. Elizabeth Ann Bartlett (1989). Sarah Grimké: Letters on the Equality of the Sexes and Other Essays. Hypatia 4 (1):175-180.
  4. Michelle Bastian (2011). The Contradictory Simultaneity of Being with Others: Exploring Concepts of Time and Community in the Work of Gloria Anzaldúa. Feminist Review 97:151-167.
    While social geographers have convincingly made the case that space is not an external constant, but rather is produced through inter-relations, anthropologists and sociologists have done much to further an understanding of time, as itself constituted through social interaction and inter-relation. Their work suggests that time is not an apolitical background to social life, but shapes how we perceive and relate to others. For those interested in exploring issues such as identity, community and difference, this suggests that attending to how (...)
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  5. Stephanie Rivera Berruz (2016). At the Crossroads: Latina Identity and Simone de Beauvoir's The Second Sex. Hypatia 31 (2):319-333.
    Simone de Beauvoir's The Second Sex has been heralded as a canonical text of feminist theory. The book focuses on providing an account of the lived experience of woman that generates a condition of otherness. However, I contend that it falls short of being able to account for the multidimensionality of identity insofar as Beauvoir's argument rests upon the comparison between racial and gendered oppression that is understood through the black–white binary. The result of this framework is the imperceptibility of (...)
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  6. Tina Chanter (2006). Abjection and the Constitutive Nature of Difference: Class Mourning In. Hypatia 21 (3).
    : This essay examines the connections between ignorance and abjection. Chanter relates Julia Kristeva's notion of abjection to the mechanisms of division found in feminist theory, race theory, film theory, and cultural theory. The neglect of the co-constitutive relationships among such categories as gender, race, and class produces abjection. If those categories are treated as separate parts of a person's identity that merely interlock or intermesh, they are rendered invisible and unknowable even in the very discourses about them. Race thus (...)
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  7. Kimberle Crenshaw (1989). Demarginalizing the Intersection of Race and Sex: A Black Feminist Critique of Antidiscrimination Doctrine, Feminist Theory and Antiracist Politics. The University of Chicago Legal Forum 140:139-167.
  8. Black Feminism (1995). A Black Feminist Statement. In Beverly Guy-Sheftal (ed.), Words of Fire: An Anthology of African American Feminist Thought. The New Press
  9. Paget Henry (2011). Gender and Africana Phenomenology. Clr James Journal 17 (1):153-183.
    This paper examines the long dialogue between Africana phenomenology and Africana feminism. In particular, it examines the exchanges between WEB Du Bois, Frantz Fanon, Lewis Gordon and Sylvia Wynter on the one hand, and a number of black feminists on the other, including bell hooks, Natasha Barnes, Farrah Griffin, and Joy James. The primary outcome of the survey of these exchanges is that the pro-feminist spaces created by black male phenomenologists have all been insufficient for the full representation of the (...)
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  10. Grace Hunt (2015). Hannah Arendt and the Negro Question. [REVIEW] Hypatia 242 (2).
    Kathryn Gines's book details Hannah Arendt 's racial and conceptual biases against Black people in the US and post-colonial Africa. Gines makes original and significant contributions to feminist philosophy by applying various feminist and anticolonial strategies, including standpoint theory and multidirectionality, to Arendt 's political essays and concepts. Feminist critiques of Arendt in general and racial critiques of "Reflections on Little Rock" in particular are not new; however, Hannah Arendt and the Negro Question offers a novel and comprehensive racial critique (...)
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  11. Joy James (2013). Seeking Beloved Community: A Feminist Race Reader. SUNY Press.
    Written over the course of twenty years, the essays brought together here highlight and analyze tensions confronted by writers, scholars, activists, politicians, and political prisoners fighting racism and sexism. Focusing on the experiences of black women calling attention to and resisting social injustice, the astonishing scale of mass and politically driven imprisonment in the United States, and issues relating to government and civic powers in American democracy, Joy James gives voice to people and ideas persistently left outside mainstream progressive discourse—those (...)
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  12. Robin James (2011). On Intersectionality and Cultural Appropriation: The Case of Postmillennial Black Hipness. Journal of Black Masculinity 1 (2).
    Feminist, critical race, and postcolonial theories have established that social identities such as race and gender are mutually constitutive—i.e., that they “intersect.” I argue that “cultural appropriation” is never merely the appropriation of culture, but also of gender, sexuality, class, etc. For example, “white hipness” is the appropriation of stereotypical black masculinity by white males. Looking at recent videos from black male hip-hop artists, I develop an account of “postmillennial black hipness.” The inverse of white hipness, this practice involves the (...)
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  13. Nancy McHugh (2014). Keeping the Strange Unfamiliar: The Racial Privilege of Dismantling Whiteness. In George Yancy (ed.), How Does it Feel to be a (White) Problem? Lexington Press 141-152.
  14. Audrey Thompson (2004). Gentlemanly Orthodoxy: Critical Race Feminism, Whiteness Theory, and the APA Manual. Educational Theory 54 (1):27-57.
    Although often viewed as burdensome, academic writing guidelines are rarely treated as actively problematic. Even progressive scholars are unlikely to challenge the cultural assumptions or political investments of academic style guides. Yet standards regarding clarity, precision, appropriateness, sensitivity, and objectivity are not politically innocent. In codifying formal guidelines for the presentation of research, academic style manuals reflect and reinscribe the racialized and gendered power relations characteristic of the academy. Drawing on critical race feminism and whiteness theories, this paper considers how (...)
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  15. Anne Schulherr Waters (2001). Syllabus: Native American Women. The American Philosophical Association Newsletter on American Indians 1 (2):22-23.
    This course covers works of Indigenous North American Women through an examination of native and nonnative historical and contemporary oratory, argument, letters, addresses, and texts. From the influence of precolonial indigenous culture on Native women’s lives, through colonization via slavery, force of weaponry, policies of removal, allotment and disease, to such turn of the century works of Laura Cornelius Kellogg and Gertrude Simmons Bonnin, and contemporary writings of Alice Kehoe, Winona Laduke, Annette Jaimes, Wilma Mankiller, Clara Sue Kidwell, Laura Whitt, (...)
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