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  1. Alia Al-Saji (2009). Muslim Women and the Rhetoric of Freedom. In Mariana Ortega & Linda Martín Alcoff (eds.), Constructing the Nation: A Race and Nationalism Reader. SUNY Press
  2. Ingrid Bartsch (2001). Feminism and Ecological Communities: An Ethic of Flourishing, And: Ecofeminist Natures: Race, Gender, Feminist Theory and Political Action (Review). Hypatia 16 (2):109-111.
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  3. Mary Ellen Brown (1994). Soap Opera and Women's Talk: The Pleasure of Resistance. Sage Publications.
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  4. Wendy Brown (1990). Manhood and Politics. Hypatia 5 (3):175-180.
  5. Wendy A. Burns-Ardolino (2003). Reading Woman: Displacing the Foundations of Femininity. Hypatia 18 (3):42-59.
  6. Judith Butler (1992). Response to Bordo's “Feminist Skepticism and the ‘Maleness’ of Philosophy”. Hypatia 7 (3):162-165.
  7. E. Carlassare (2000). Socialist and Cultural Ecofeminism Allies in Resistance. Ethics and the Environment 5 (1):89-106.
  8. Saba Fatima (2015). Book Review: Feminist Edges of the Qur’An. [REVIEW] Hypatia 219:00-00.
    Overall, this book is indispensable for anyone wanting to have a richer understanding of how the Qur’an is read and interpreted within a feminist context. It is a wonderful synthesis of the work that has been done in the field thus far and provides tools necessary to seek out new avenues in understanding the Qur’an while still retaining a feminist spirit. Yet, in the end, this book does not disturb Muslim world order. It remains an overwhelming possibility for Hidayatullah that (...)
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  9. Heidi Nelson Hochenedel & Douglas Mann (2001). On the Impotence of Cultural Post-Feminism. Social Philosophy Today 17:163-178.
    In this paper, we argue that the Cultural Left and what we call cultural post-feminism has done little to alleviate conditions of subjugation and oppression of girlsand women outside of academia and has in fact been complacent with patriarchal social structures. Cultural post-feminism, with its focus on difference and identity and its fear of speaking on behalf of the down-trodden for fear of "colonizing" them with Western ideologies, has made few serious attempts to evoke a real alternative to super-tolerant liberal (...)
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  10. Christine James (2010). The Common Vernacular of Power Relations in Heavy Metal and Christian Fundamentalist Performances. In Rosemary Hill Karl Spracklen (ed.), Heavy Fundametalisms: Music, Metal and Politics. Inter-Disciplinary Press
    Wittgenstein’s comment that what can be shown cannot be said has a special resonance with visual representations of power in both Heavy Metal and Fundamentalist Christian communities. Performances at metal shows, and performances of ‘religious theatre’, share an emphasis on violence and destruction. For example, groups like GWAR and Cannibal Corpse feature violent scenes in stage shows and album covers, scenes that depict gory results of unrestrained sexuality that are strikingly like Halloween ‘Hell House’ show presented by neo-Conservative, Fundamentalist Christian (...)
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  11. Steve Jones (2011). Porn of the Dead: Necrophilia, Feminism, and Gendering the Undead. In Christopher Moreman & Cory Rushton (eds.), Zombies Are Us: Essays on the Humanity of the Walking Dead. McFarland 40-60.
    Erotic Nights of the Living Dead (1980) may have featured both animated corpses and hardcore sex scenes, but only recently have Re-Penetrator (2004) and Porn of the Dead (2006) managed to fully eroticise the living dead, allowing these creatures to engage in intercourse. In doing so, the usually a-subjective zombie is allotted a key facet of identity - sexuality. This development within the sub-genre needs accounting for outside of the contexts of porn studies, where it has only been briefly touched (...)
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  12. Blanka Knotková-Čapková (2012). Similarities and Differences in Postcolonial Bengali Women’s Writings: The Case of Mahasweta Debi and Mallika Sengupta. Argument: Biannual Philosophical Journal 2 (1):97-115.
    The emancipation of women has become a strong critical discourse in Bengali literature since the 19th century. Only since the second half of the 20th century, however, have female writers markedly stepped out of the shadow of their male colleagues, and the writings on women become more and more often articulated by women themselves. In this article, I focus on particular concepts of femininity in selected texts of two outstanding writers of different generations, a prose writer, and a woman poet: (...)
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  13. Mary B. Mahowald (1997). What Classical American Philosophers Missed: Jane Addams, Critical Pragmatism, and Cultural Feminism. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 31 (1):39-54.
  14. Uma Narayan (1998). Essence of Culture and a Sense of History: A Feminist Critique of Cultural Essentialism. Hypatia 13 (2):86 - 106.
    Drawing parallels between gender essentialism and cultural essentialism, I point to some common features of essentialist pictures of culture. I argue that cultural essentialism is detrimental to feminist agendas and suggest strategies for its avoidance. Contending that some forms of cultural relativism buy into essentialist notions of culture, I argue that postcolonial feminists need to be cautious about essentialist contrasts between "Western" and "Third World" cultures.
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  15. Mariana Ortega & Linda Martín Alcoff (eds.) (2009). Constructing the Nation: A Race and Nationalism Reader. SUNY Press.
    What is the norm of Americanness today, how has it changed, and how pluralistic is it in reality? from the Introduction In this volume philosophers and social ...
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  16. C. Sandilands (1999). Raising Your Hand in the Council of All Beings: Ecofeminism and Citizenship. Ethics and the Environment 4 (2):219-233.
  17. Katie Terezakis (2009). Editor's Introduction and Open Letter on the Real Problem of Woman. In Engaging Agnes Heller: A Critical Companion. Lexington Books