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  1. Lisa Adkins & Beverley Skeggs (eds.) (2004). Feminism After Bourdieu. Blackwell Publishing.
    Such an absence seems ultimately fatal. Yet as this volume amply demonstrates, the richness of his social theory can be opened up by contemporary feminism.
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  2. Scott F. Aikin, Poe's Law, Group Polarization, and the Epistemology of Online Religious Discourse.
    Poe's Law is roughly that online parodies of religious extremism are indistinguishable from instances of sincere extremism. Poe's Law may be expressed in a variety of ways, each highlighting either a facet of indirect discourse generally, attitudes of online audiences, or the quality of online religious material. As a consequence of the polarization of online discussions, invocations of Poe's Law have relevance in wider circles than religion. Further, regular invocations of Poe's Law in critical discussions have the threat of further (...)
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  3. István Aranyosi (2012). Quantifier Versus Poetry. Stylistic Impoverishment and Socio-Cultural Estrangement of Anglo-American Philosophy in the Last Hundred Years. The Pluralist 7 (1):94-103.
    Recent discussion, both in the academia-related popular media and in some professional academic venues, about the current state and role of mainstream Anglo-American analytic philosophy among the humanities, has revealed a certain uneasiness expressed by both champions of this approach and traditional adversaries of it regarding its perceived isolation from the other fields of humanities. The fiercer critics go as far as to claim that the image of this type of philosophizing in the contemporary world is one of a discipline (...)
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  4. Krzysztof Brzechczyn & Katarzyna Paprzycka (eds.) (2012). Thinking About Provincialism in Thinking. Rodopi.
    The volume addresses a problem rarely discussed by philosophers - the question of provincialism in science (in the broadest sense of the term). There are only a few great centers of science, which attract funding and provide almost ideal opportunities for research and development. They also attract some of the best researchers. Some - but not all. For a variety of reasons, some of the best researchers, or ones who have that potential, may do science outside these centers, in the (...)
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  5. Urszula Chowaniec & Marzenna Jakubczak (2012). Conceptualizing Generation and Transformation in Women’s Writing. ARGUMENT 2 (1):5-15.
    The main objective of this collection of papers is to explore ideas of generation and transformation in the context of postdependency discourse as it may be traced in women’s writing published in Bengali, Polish, Czech, Russian and English. As we believe, literature does not have merely a descriptive function or a purely visionary quality but serves also as a discursive medium, which is rhetorically sophisticated, imaginatively influential and stimulates cultural dynamics. It is an essential carrier of collective memory and a (...)
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  6. Rory J. Conces (2008). Coming to Grips with the Queer Festival and Deeper Concerns. Bosnia Daily (September 8):9.
    There has been a great deal of talk about the upcoming Queer Festival in Sarajevo. However, the discussion has taken on a bitter tone because some have made much of the fact that the organizers plan to hold the festival during the month of Ramadan. To hold the festival during that time, according to some pious Muslims, is a blasphemous act, one that is rude and disrespectful towards those of the faith. Of course, we must not forget that this festival (...)
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  7. Rory J. Conces (2007). Tarifa’s Exposition of the Kanun: Something for Sociologists and Philosophers Alike. Sociological Analysis 1:125-27.
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  8. Rory J. Conces (2004). Review of Azar Nafisi, Reading Lolita in Tehran: A Memoir of Books. [REVIEW] International Third World Studies Journal and Review 15:23-25.
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  9. Philip E. Devine (1996). Human Diversity and the Culture Wars: A Philosophical Perspective on Contemporary Cultural Conflict. Praeger.
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  10. Dave Elder-Vass (2011). The Causal Power of Discourse. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 41 (2):143-160.
    This paper outlines a realist approach to the social ontology of discourse. It seeks to synthesise some elements of the approach to discourse found in the early work of Michel Foucault with a critical realist understanding of the causal power of social structures. It will argue that discursive structures can be causally significant when they are normatively endorsed and enforced by specific groups of people; that it is not discourse as such but these groups—discursive circles—that are causally effective; and that (...)
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  11. Sarah Franklin, Celia Lury & Jackie Stacey (eds.) (1991). Off-Centre: Feminism and Cultural Studies. Harpercollins Academic.
    This indispensible collection brings together feminist theory and cultural studies, looking at issues such as pop culture and the media, science and technology, ...
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  12. Dominic Griffiths & Maria Prozesky (2010). The Politics of Dwelling: Being White / Being South African. Africa Today 56 (4):22-41.
    This paper explores the incongruence between white South Africans’ pre- and post-apartheid experiences of home and identity, of which a wave of emigration is arguably a result. Among the commonest reasons given for emigrating are crime and affirmative action; however, this paper uncovers a deeper motivation for emigration using Charles Taylor’s concept of the social imaginary and Martin Heidegger’s concept of dwelling. The skewed social imaginary maintained by apartheid created an unrealistic sense of dwelling for most white South Africans. After (...)
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  13. Leonid Grinin, Alexander Markov, Markov & Andrey Korotayev (2009). Aromorphoses in Biological and Social Evolution: Some General Rules for Biological and Social Forms of Macroevolution. Social Evolution and History 8 (2).
    The comparison between biological and social macroevolution is a very important (though insufficiently studied) subject whose analysis renders new significant possibilities to comprehend the processes, trends, mechanisms, and peculiarities of each of the two types of macroevolution. Of course, there are a few rather important (and very understandable) differences between them; however, it appears possible to identify a number of fundamental similarities. One may single out at least three fundamental sets of factors determining those similarities. First of all, those similarities (...)
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  14. Holger Henke (1997). Towards an Ontology of Caribbean Existence. Social Epistemology 11 (1):39 – 58.
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  15. David Inglis (2007). The Warring Twins Sociology, Cultural Studies, Alterity and Sameness. History of the Human Sciences 20 (2):99-122.
    Of all sociology's `strange others', cultural studies is perhaps the least unfamiliar to many sociologists. Yet cultural studies exists in one of the most ambiguous relationships with sociology of any academic discipline. In this article, it is argued that the complicated nature of the relationship is compelled by the very closeness of the two participants in it. What often seems to be an ongoing state of ritualized antagonism between them flows not from their ostensible differences but in fact from their (...)
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  16. Marzenna Jakubczak (2011). Natura i Bogini. Ekofeministyczna rewizja mitów według Mariji Gimbutas. Kultura I Historia 20.
    In this paper I reflect on the mythocreative potential of Gimbutas’ narrative reconstruction of archaic culture and its impact on the contemporary critique of culture. First, I revise the notion of ‘nature’ in the context of two opposing conceptual paradigms of change-over-time, namely cyclic and linear. Then, I discuss symbolic connotation of ‘Nature – Culture’ interrelationship with special reference to the ‘idyllic vision of Goddess’ proposed by Marija Gimbutas (1921-1994), American archaeologist of Lithuanian origin, the author of the groundbreaking books (...)
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  17. Bernward Joerges (1988). Technology in Everyday Life: Conceptual Queries. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 18 (2):219–237.
    According to an editor of The Economist, the world produced, in the years since World War II, seven times more goods than throughout all history. This is well appreciated by lay people, but has hardly affected social scientists. They do not have the conceptual apparatus for understanding accelerated material-technical change and its meaning for people's personal lives, for their ways of relating to them-selves and to the outside world. Of course, a great deal of speculation about emerging life forms in (...)
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  18. Mehmet Karabela (2012). Working Out Egypt: Effendi Masculinity and Subject Formation in Colonial Modernity. [REVIEW] Canadian Journal of History 47 (3):696-698.
  19. Jeff Kochan (2010). Latour's Heidegger. Social Studies of Science 40 (4):579-598.
    Bruno Latour has had a tremendous impact on the field of science studies. Yet, it is not always easy to say what he stands for. Indeed, Latour has often claimed that his work lacks any overall unity. In this essay, I suggest that at least one concept remains constant throughout Latour’s diverse studies of modern science and technology, namely, mediation. I try to make good this claim by focussing on Latour’s numerous attempts over the years to distance himself from, so (...)
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  20. Maria Kronfeldner (2007). Darwinism, Memes, and Creativity: A Critique of Darwinian Analogical Reasoning From Nature to Culture. Dissertation, University of Regensburg
    The dissertation criticizes two analogical applications of Darwinism to the spheres of mind and culture: the Darwinian approach to creativity and memetics. These theories rely on three basic analogies: the ontological analogy states that the basic ontological units of culture are so-called memes, which are replicators like genes; the origination analogy states that novelty in human creativity emerges in a "blind" Darwinian manner; and the explanatory units of selection analogy states that memes are "egoistic" and that they can spread independently (...)
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  21. Maria Kronfeldner (2007). Is Cultural Evolution Lamarckian? Biology and Philosophy 22 (4):493-512.
    The article addresses the question whether culture evolves in a Lamarckian manner. I highlight three central aspects of a Lamarckian concept of evolution: the inheritance of acquired characteristics, the transformational pattern of evolution, and the concept of directed changes. A clear exposition of these aspects shows that a system can be a Darwinian variational system instead of a Lamarckian transformational one, even if it is based on inheritance of acquired characteristics and/or on Lamarckian directed changes. On this basis, I apply (...)
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  22. John Krummel (forthcoming). World, Nothing, and Globalization in Nishida and Nancy. In Leah Kalmanson James Mark Shields (ed.), Buddhist Responses to Globalization.
    The “shrinking” of the globe in the last few centuries has made explicit that the world is a tense unity of many: the many worlds are forced to contend with one another. Nishida Kitarō, the founder of the Kyoto school, once stated that to be is to be implaced. We exist by partaking in “the socio-historical world.” More recently, Jean-luc Nancy has conceived of the world in terms of sense. What is striking in both is that the world emerges out (...)
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  23. Mona Mamulea (2012). A Thought Experiment of Cross-Cultural Comparison. The Question of Rationality. Cercetări Filosofico-Psihologice 4 (2):105-114.
    David Bloor’s thought experiment is taken into consideration to suggest that the rationality of the Other cannot be inferred by way of argument for the reason that it is unavoidably contained as a hidden supposition by any argument engaged in proving it. We are able to understand a different culture only as far as we recognize in it the same kind of rationality that works in our own culture. Another kind of rationality is either impossible, or indiscernible.
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  24. Domenic Marbaniang, Globalization: A Theological Overview.
    Christ's call for the disciples to be salt and light obliges them to respond to globalization in a theologically consistent way. This paper tries to explore the relation between the Gospel, evangelism, gospelization, social responsibility, and globalization. A key term explored is gospelization. The paper suggests some interpretations in the theology of history.
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  25. Frances E. Mascia-Lees (2000). Taking a Stand in a Postfeminist World: Toward an Engaged Cultural Criticism. State University of New York Press.
    Taking a Stand in a Postfeminist World offers an engaged cultural criticism in a postfeminist context.
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  26. Nuria Sara Miras Boronat (2007). Máscara, Lenguaje y El Sueño Imposible de Ser. la Torre Del Virrey. Revista de Estudios Culturales 4:62-66.
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  27. Aloys Müller (1922). Strukturwissenschaft und Kulturwissenschaft. Kant-Studien 27 (1-2):59-85.
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  28. Shelley M. Park (1999). Re-Viewing the Memory Wars: Some Feminist Philosophical Reflections. In In Margo Rivera, ed. Fragment by Fragment: Feminist Perspectives on Memory and Child Sexual Abuse. Charlottetown, PEI: Gynergy Books, 283-308.
    An examination of the debates over the so-called 'false' memory syndrome. In this paper, I concur that memory is malleable, but interrogate notions of truth and falsity underlying standards used to evaluate the accuracy of memories of abuse. Such standards divert us, I suggest, from recognizing the truth behind widespread recollections of abuse at the hands of patriarchy.
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  29. Markku Roinila (2009). G.W. Leibniz and Scientific Societies. Journal of Technology Management 46 (1-2):165-179.
    The famous philosopher Leibniz (1646-1716) was also active in the (cultural) politics of his time. His interest in forming scientific societies never waned and his efforts led to the founding of the Berlin Academy of Sciences. He also played a part in the founding of the Dresden Academy of Science and the St. Petersburg Academy of Science. Though Leibniz's models for the scientific society were the Royal Society and the Royal Science Academy of France, his pansophistic vision of scientific cooperation (...)
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  30. Jamie P. Ross (2008). “White Privilege and the Color of Fear.” Chapter in Lessons From The Color of Fear. In Victor Lee Lewis & Hugh Vasquez (eds.), Lessons from The Color of Fear Field Reports. Using the Color of Fear in the Classroom. Speak Out - The Institute for Democratic Education and Cultural.
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  31. Constantine Sandis (2009). Hitchcock's Conscious Use of Freud's Unconscious. Europe's Journal of Psychology 3:56-81.
    This paper argues that Hitchcock's so-called 'Freudian' films (esp. Spellbound, Psycho, and Marnie) pay tribute to the cultural magnetism of Freud's ideas whist being critical of the tehories themselves.
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  32. Markus Schlecker & Eric Hirsch (2001). Incomplete Knowledge: Ethnography and the Crisis of Context in Studies of Media, Science and Technology. History of the Human Sciences 14 (1):69-87.
    This article examines strands of an intellectual history in Media and Cultural Studies and Science and Technology Studies in both of which researchers were prompted to take up ethnography. Three historical phases of this process are identified. The move between phases was the result of particular displacements and contestations of perspective in the research procedures within each discipline. Thus concerns about appropriate contextualization led to the eventual embrace of anthropological ethnographic methods. The article traces the subsequent emergence of a ‘crisis (...)
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  33. Robert Keith Shaw (2011). Understanding Public Organisations: Collective Intentionality as Cooperation. In Proceedings of the 2011 Conference of the Philosophy of Education Society of Australasia. Auckland, New Zealand. Philosophy of Education Society of Australasia.
    This paper introduces the concept of collective intentionality and shows its relevance when we seek to understand public management. Social ontology – particularly its leading concept, collective intentionality – provides critical insights into public organisations. The paper sets out the some of the epistemological limitations of cultural theories and takes as its example of these the group-grid theory of Douglas and Hood. It then draws upon Brentano, Husserl and Searle to show the ontological character of public management. Modern public institutions (...)
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  34. Morag Shiach (ed.) (1999). Feminism and Cultural Studies. Oxford University Press.
    This latest volume in the Oxford Readings in Feminism series consists of an exciting collection of articles addressing key questions for feminism and cultural studies. Encompassing both classic articles and challenging new work, Feminism and Cultural Studies is organized thematically and addresses commodification, women and labor, mass culture, fantasy and ideas of home.
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  35. Ella Shohat (2006). Taboo Memories, Diasporic Voices. Duke University Press.
    Written between 1985 and 2005, the twelve essays in this collection include some of Shohat's best known pieces as well as one new essay.
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  36. Beverley Skeggs (ed.) (1995). Feminist Cultural Theory: Process and Production. Distributed Exclusively in the Usa and Canada by St. Martin's Press.
    Introduction BEVERLEY SKEGGS By asking a group of feminist cultural theorists who have produced exemplary interdisciplinary scholarship in the to reflect ...
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  37. Marco Solinas (2009). Review of Richard Sennett, The Culture of the New Capitalism. [REVIEW] Humana.Mente 10:151-153.
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  38. Erin C. Tarver (2013). Signifying "Hillary&Quot;: Making (Political) Sense with Butler and Dewey. Contemporary Pragmatism 10 (2):25-47.
  39. Sue Thornham (2000). Feminist Theory and Cultural Studies: Stories of Unsettled Relations. Arnold.
    Feminist theory is a central strand of cultural studies. This book explores the history of feminist cultural studies from the early work of Mary Wollstonecraft, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Virginia Woolf, Simone de Beauvoir, through the 1970s Women's Liberation Movement. It also provides a comprehensive introduction to the contemporary key approaches, theories and debates of feminist theory within cultural studies, offering a major re-mapping of the field. It will be an essential text for students taking courses within both cultural studies and (...)
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  40. Lucinda Vandervort (2012). Access to Justice and the Public Interest in the Administration of Justice. University of New Brunswick Law Journal 63:124-144.
    The public interest in the administration of justice requires access to justice for all. But access to justice must be “meaningful” access. Meaningful access requires procedures, processes, and institutional structures that facilitate communication among participants and decision-makers and ensure that judges and other decision-makers have the resources they need to render fully informed and sound decisions. Working from that premise, which is based on a reconceptualization of the objectives and methods of the justice process, the author proposes numerous specific changes (...)
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  41. Lidia Wiśniewska (2012). Cleopatra – a Queen, a Lover, a Mother: Transformations of the Image. ARGUMENT 2 (1):151-169.
    Transformations are not only conditioned by facts encompassing narrower or wider panoramas: from concentrating on death and one (political) role (the ode of Horace), through recalling Cleopatra’s mature life and love (the drama of Shakespeare), to creating an image embracing the heroine’s whole life with its numerous roles, but as a mother and a daughter in the first place, because even her lovers resemble a father and a child (the fictional biography of Karen Essex). Above all, they appear to be (...)
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  42. Antonina Łuszczykiewicz (2012). Kulturowe stereotypy i uprzedzenia wobec Indusów w twórczości Rudyarda Kiplinga. ARGUMENT 2 (1):199-221.
    English title: Cultural Stereotypes and Bias Towards the Indians in Writing of Rudyard Kipling. The aim of this paper is to characterize and dispute the cultural stereotypes and prejudices against the Indians depicted in the writings of Rudyard Kipling (1865–1936), one of the most popular British novelists of the Victorian era. The starting point for these reflections is George Orwell’s essay in which he describes Kipling as a racist and imperialist as well as a morally insensitive and aesthetically disgusting figure. (...)
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