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  1. Ruth Abbey (2006). Turning or Spinning? Charles Taylor's Catholicism: A Reply to Ian Fraser. Contemporary Political Theory 5 (2):163.
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  2. Theodor Adorno, Günter Anders & Max Horkheimer (2001). Discussion of a Paper by Ludwig Marcuse on the Relationship of Need and Culture in Nietzsche (July 14, 1942). Constellations 8 (1):130-135.
  3. Adeshina Afolayan (2008). Is Postmodernism Meaningful in Yoruba? Journal of Social Philosophy 39 (2):209–224.
  4. S. J. Al-Azam (2011). Turkey, Secularism and the EU: A View From Damascus. Philosophy and Social Criticism 37 (4):449-457.
    This article deals with the impact of the free, democratic and peaceful accession to power of the Islamic Justice and Development Party (JDP) in Turkey on the Arab world in general and on the Islamic currents active in Arab societies in particular. A main point is looking into how Arab political formations and especially political Islam are trying to make sense out of such recent developments in Turkey as: (1) the fact that traditionally reviled Turkish secularism, Kemalism and westernism could (...)
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  5. Anita L. Allen, Undressing Difference: The Hijab in the West.
    On March 15, 2006, French President Jacques Chirac signed into law an amendment to his country's education statute, banning the wearing of conspicuous signs of religious affiliation in public schools. Prohibited items included a large cross, a veil, or skullcap. The ban was expressly introduced by lawmakers as an application of the principle of government neutrality, du principe de laïcité. Opponents of the law viewed it primarily as an intolerant assault against the hijab, a head and neck wrap worn by (...)
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  6. Alice Anberrée (2012). What Personal Responsibilities Facilitate the Construction of a Cultural Democracy? Involvement of the Public in the Construction of a Cultural Democracy. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 23:261-272.
    In France a difference has been established between cultural popularization and cultural democracy. The former is aimed at spreading works of art in as large a way as possible; the latter emphasizes the participation of the public. From there, we argue that moving from cultural popularization towards cultural democracy can lead to a shift in responsibilities from professionals towards the general public. With reference to the theoretical background of reception, appropriation and participation, we lead a participant observation on three different (...)
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  7. Sharon Anderson-Gold (forthcoming). Cosmopolitanism and Democracy: Global Governance Without a Global State. Social Philosophy Today.
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  8. Sharon Anderson-Gold (2007). Human Rights, Cultural Identity, and Democracy. Social Philosophy Today 23:57-68.
    This paper traces the evolution of the international concept of a human right to culture from a general and individual right of participation in the public life of a state (1966, Article 27 of the IC of Civil and Political Rights), to a group right to a cultural identity (1992 Declaration on the rights of persons belonging to national or ethnic, religious or linguistic minorities). I argue that the original generic formulation of the human right to culture reflected the nineteenth-century (...)
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  9. Mats Andrén (2012). Citizenship, Identity and the Politics of Multiculturalism: The Rise of Muslim Consciousness. By Nasar Meer. The European Legacy 17 (5):685 - 685.
    The European Legacy, Volume 17, Issue 5, Page 685, August 2012.
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  10. Eleni Andreouli & Caroline Howarth (2013). National Identity, Citizenship and Immigration: Putting Identity in Context. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 43 (3):361-382.
    In this paper we suggest that there is a need to examine what is meant by “context” in Social Psychology and present an example of how to place identity in its social and institutional context. Taking the case of British naturalisation, the process whereby migrants become citizens, we show that the identity of naturalised citizens is defined by common-sense ideas about Britishness and by immigration policies. An analysis of policy documents on “earned citizenship” and interviews with naturalised citizens shows that (...)
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  11. Sharp Andrew (2000). What If Value and Rights Lie Foundationally in Groups? The Māori Case. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 2 (2):22-23.
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  12. D. Archard (2007). Negotiating Diversity: Liberalism, Democracy and Cultural Difference Matthew Festenstein. Contemporary Political Theory 6 (4):496.
  13. Larry Arnhart (1986). Education and Culture in the Political Thought of Aristotle. International Studies in Philosophy 18 (1):95-96.
  14. Elena Aronova (2012). The Congress for Cultural Freedom, Minerva, and the Quest for Instituting “Science Studies” in the Age of Cold War. Minerva 50 (3):307-337.
    The Congress for Cultural Freedom is remembered as a paramount example of the “cultural cold wars.” In this paper, I discuss the ways in which this powerful transnational organization sought to promote “science studies” as a distinct – and politically relevant – area of expertise, and part of the CCF broader agenda to offer a renewed framework for liberalism. By means of its Study Groups, international conferences and its periodicals, such as Minerva, the Congress developed into an influential forum for (...)
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  15. Hilliard Aronovitch (2005). Trudeau or Taylor? The Central Question. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 8 (3):309-325.
    Abstract Juxtaposing Pierre Trudeau and Charles Taylor allows for assessing not simply an epoch in Canadian political life but more fundamentally two contrasting visions of modern government and society. The key is not in the usual contrasts: liberalism versus communitarianism or individual rights versus collective rights; but in the opposition between Trudeau?s centralized and Taylor?s decentralized vision of federalism. What emerges from analyzing that familiar difference is significant and ironic. While Taylor?s view seems more cognizant of government?s formative activity and (...)
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  16. O. Astorga (2006). Ensayos Sobre Filosofía Política y Cultura. Universidad Central de Venezuela, Ediciones de la Biblioteca.
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  17. A. Azmanova (2011). Against the Politics of Fear: On Deliberation, Inclusion and the Political Economy of Trust. Philosophy and Social Criticism 37 (4):401-412.
    This is an inquiry into the economic psychology of trust: that is, what model of the political economy of complex liberal democracies is conducive to attitudes that allow difference to be perceived in the terms of ‘significant other’, rather than as a menacing or an irrelevant stranger. As a test case of prevailing perceptions of otherness in European societies, I examine attitudes towards Turkey’s accession to the European Union.
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  18. Michael Bacon (2010). Richard Rorty, Philosophy as Cultural Politics (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2007), Paperback, Isbn 9780521698351, 218 Pages,£ 15.99. [REVIEW] Critical Horizons 9 (1):102-104.
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  19. Michael Bacon (2008). Philosophy as Cultural Politics. Critical Horizons 9 (1):102-104.
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  20. Veit Bader (1997). The Cultural Conditions of Transnational Citizenship: On the Interpenetration of Political and Ethnic Cultures. Political Theory 25 (6):771-813.
    No reverberatory effect of the great war has caused American public opinion more solicitude than the failure of the “melting-pot.” The tendency... has been for the national clusters of immigrants, as they became more and more firmly established and more and more prosperous to cultivate more and more assiduously the literatures and cultural traditions of their homelands. Assimilation, in other words, instead of washing out the memories of Europe, made them more and more intensely real. Just as these clusters became (...)
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  21. Veit Bader (1995). Reply to Michael Walzer. Political Theory 23 (2):250-252.
  22. Alain Badiou (2006). Polemics. Verso.
    PT. 1. PHILOSOPHY AND CIRCUMSTANCES: Introduction -- Philosophy and the question of war today: 1. On September 11 2001: philosophy and the 'War against terrorism' -- 2. Fragments of a public journal on the American war against Iraq -- 3. On the war against Serbia: who strikes whom in the world today? -- The 'democratic' fetish and racism: 4. On parliamentary 'democracy': the French presidential elections of 2002 -- 5. The law on the Islamic headscarf -- 6. Daily humiliation -- (...)
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  23. Hye-Jeong Baek (2002). A Comparative Study of Moral Development of Korean and British Children. Journal of Moral Education 31 (4):373-391.
    The present study explored Kohlberg's theory of moral development in relation to Korean and British children. A total of 128 Korean and British children aged 7-16 years were interviewed individually using Kohlberg's moral dilemmas, Form A. It was thought that the children in both cultural groups would develop moral stages at a similar rate. However, they showed cultural differences in the use of moral orientations. In addition, it was not possible to match some of the responses from the Korean children (...)
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  24. Rebecca Bamford (2011). Cultural Diversity, Families, and Research Subjects. American Journal of Bioethics 11 (5):33-34.
  25. A. Barlas (2013). Uncrossed Bridges Islam, Feminism and Secular Democracy. Philosophy and Social Criticism 39 (4-5):417-425.
    In this article I review two contrasting approaches to Muslim women’s rights: those that want Muslims to secularize the Qur’an as the precondition for getting rights and those that emphasize the importance of a liberatory Qur’anic hermeneutics to Muslim women’s struggles for rights and equality. As examples of the former, I take the works of Nasr Abu Zayd and Raja Rhouni and, of the latter, my own. In addition to joining the debates on Muslim women’s rights, this exercise is meant (...)
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  26. Bashir Bashir (2012). Reconciling Historical Injustices: Deliberative Democracy and the Politics of Reconciliation. [REVIEW] Res Publica 18 (2):127-143.
    Deliberative democracy is often celebrated and endorsed because of its promise to include, empower, and emancipate otherwise oppressed and excluded social groups through securing their voice and granting them impact in reasoned public deliberation. This article explores the ability of Habermas’ theory of deliberative democracy to accommodate the demands of historically excluded social groups in democratic plural societies. It argues that the inclusive, transformative, and empowering potential of Habermas’ theory of deliberative democracy falters when confronted with particular types of historical (...)
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  27. Amitrajeet A. Batabyal (2003). Bernard Lewis, What Went Wrong? Western Impact and Middle Eastern Response. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 16 (4):416-418.
  28. Margaret P. Battin (1995). Put Up or Shut Up? A Reply to Peggy DesAutels' Defense of Christian Science. Journal of Social Philosophy 26 (3):113-122.
  29. Z. Bauman (2003). The Killing State: Capital Punishment in Law, Politics and Culture. Contemporary Political Theory 2 (2):255-257.
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  30. Timothy A. Beach-Verhey (2009). Calvinist Resources for Contemporary American Political Life: A Critique of Michael Walzer's Revolution of the Saints. Journal of Religious Ethics 37 (3):473-493.
    Inheriting the religious prejudices of the Enlightenment, many supporters of liberal democracy consider John Calvin's theology contrary to the norms and virtues necessary for productive public discourse in a religiously and culturally diverse society. In Revolution of the Saints: A Study in the Origins of Radical Politics , Michael Walzer makes a similar assumption, arguing that, despite its contribution to political modernization, the inherent fideism, absolutism, and intolerance of Calvinism constitutes a threat to public discourse in liberal society. In this (...)
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  31. Ulrich Beck (1996). How Neighbors Become Jews: The Political Construction of the Stranger In an Age of Reflexive Modernity. Constellations 2 (3):378-396.
  32. Ronald Beiner (1994). Revising the Self. Critical Review 8 (2):247-256.
    The liberal political morality developed in Will Kymlicka's Liberalism, Community and Culture is in various respects stronger and more coherent than many theories of Kymlicka's liberal predecessors and contemporaries, but it still suffers from important weaknesses that characterize other liberalisms. By ridding liberal theory of unnecessary defects, Kymlicka helps to clarify why even a liberalism capable of repelling the communitarian challenge will continue to be subject to theoretical criticism.
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  33. Ronald Beiner & W. J. Norman (eds.) (2001). Canadian Political Philosophy: Contemporary Reflections. Oxford University Press.
    Canadian theorists and philosophers are recognized internationally for their contributions to normative debates about citizenship, multiculturalism, and nationalism. The superb essays collected here reflect a broad range of contemporary political and philosophical issues: liberalism and citizenship; equality, justice, and gender; minority rights and identity; nationalism and self-determination; and the history of political philosophy.
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  34. S. Benhabib (2010). The Return of Political Theology: The Scarf Affair in Comparative Constitutional Perspective in France, Germany and Turkey. Philosophy and Social Criticism 36 (3-4):451-471.
    Increasingly in today’s world we are experiencing intensifying antagonisms around religious and ethno-cultural differences. The confrontation between political Islam and the so-called ‘West’ has replaced the rhetoric of the Cold War against communism. This new constellation has not only challenged the hypothesis that ‘secularization’ inevitably accompanied modernity but has also placed on the agenda political theology as a potent force in many societies. This article analyzes the contemporary revival of political theology by focusing on the headscarf debate in comparative constitutional (...)
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  35. Seyla Benhabib (2006). The "Claims" of Culture Properly Interpreted: Response to Nikolas Kompridis. Political Theory 34 (3):383 - 388.
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  36. Seyla Benhabib (2004). On Culture, Public Reason, and Deliberation: Response to Pensky and Peritz. Constellations 11 (2):291-299.
  37. Jane Bennett & Michael J. Shapiro (eds.) (2002). The Politics of Moralizing. Routledge.
    Through postcolonial studies, indigenous perspectives are finally being heard, challenging various Western views of the world. However, these challenges are often made in the same moralizing voice as the original conlonizations were justified. In keeping with the moralizing-resistant perspectives of Foucault, Benjamin and Derrida The Politics of Moralizing issues a warning about the risks of speaking, writing and thinking in a manner too confident about you own judgments. Can a clear line be drawn between dogmatism and simple certainty and indignation? (...)
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  38. Paul Benson (2001). Culture and Responsibility: A Reply to Moody-Adams. Journal of Social Philosophy 32 (4):610–620.
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  39. Cristina Bicchieri & Ryan Muldoon, Social Norms.
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  40. Nigel Biggar & Linda Hogan (eds.) (2009). Religious Voices in Public Places. OUP Oxford.
    Must religious voices keep quiet in public places? Does fairness in a plural society require it? Must the expression of religious belief be so authoritarian as to threaten civil peace? Do we need translation into 'secular' language, or should we try to manage polyglot conversation? How neutral is 'secular' language? Is a religious argument necessarily unreasonable? What issues are specific to Islam within this exchange? -/- These are just some of the pressing questions addressed by Religious Voices in Public Places. (...)
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  41. A. Bilgrami (2012). Islam and the West: Conflict, Democracy, Identity. Philosophy and Social Criticism 38 (4-5):477-483.
    This short essay analyzes the deception and self-deception in talk of ‘the clash of civilizations’ and proceeds to diagnose what is wrong in the standard understanding of Islam in the Western media today by looking to the abiding history of colonial relations with Islam down to this day and also looking to the relation between ideals of democracy and the formation of religious identities. The essay closes with some remarks about the nature of identity and the importance to one's own (...)
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  42. Michael Blake & Mathias Risse (2008). Migration, Territoriality, and Culture. In Ryberg Jesper & Petersen Thomas (eds.), New Waves in Applied Ethics. Palgrave.
    Little work has been done to explore the moral foundations of the state’s right to territory.1 In modern times, the state has mostly been assumed to be a territorial unit, and no need was perceived to reflect on precisely what justifies its territorial jurisdiction. The state’s territoriality is related to another topic that has remained under-theorized: immigration. There is, moreover, an obvious relationship between these topics: the more powerful a state’s rights over its territory, the more powerful the right to (...)
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  43. James W. Boettcher (2005). Strong Inclusionist Accounts of the Role of Religion in Political Decision-Making. Journal of Social Philosophy 36 (4):497–516.
  44. James Bohman (1999). Citizenship and Norms of Publicity: Wide Public Reason in Cosmopolitan Societies. Political Theory 27 (2):176-202.
  45. Niels Bohr (1958/2010). Atomic Physics and Human Knowledge. New York, Wiley.
    These articles and speeches by the Nobel Prize-winning physicist date from 1934 to 1958. Rather than expositions on quantum physics, the papers are philosophical in nature, exploring the relevance of atomic physics to many areas of human endeavor. Includes an essay in which Bohr and Einstein discuss quantum and_wave equation theories. 1961 edition.
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  46. Niels Bohr (1958/1987). Essays 1932-1957 on Atomic Physics and Human Knowledge. Ox Bow Press.
    Introduction -- Light and life -- Biology and atomic physics -- Natural philosophy and human cultures -- Discussion with Einstein on epistemological problems in atomic physics -- Unity of knowledge -- Atoms and human knowledge -- Physical science and the problem of life.
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  47. Luigi Bonanate, Roberto Papini & William Sweet (eds.) (2011). Intercultural Dialogue and Human Rights. Council for Research in Values and Philosophy.
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  48. Idil Boran (2001). Contra Moore: The Dependency of Identity on Culture. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 4 (2):26-44.
    In her article, ?Beyond the Cultural Argument for Liberal Nationalism?, Margaret Moore provides a critique of this argument, and commends, as an alternative, an identity?based approach to liberal nationalism. Moore draws a distinction between identity and culture, and suggests that liberal nationalism should be founded on the former rather than the latter. This article argues, by contrast, that although identity and culture need to be distinguished, they are not as dissociable as Moore contends. It argues that the distinction between (...)
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  49. G. Bosetti (2011). Introduction: Addressing the Politics of Fear. The Challenge Posed by Pluralism to Europe. Philosophy and Social Criticism 37 (4):371-382.
    The introduction to this issue is meant to address the ways in which turbulent immigration is challenging European democratic countries’ capacity to integrate the pluralism of cultures in light of the current state of economic instability, strong public debt, unemployment and an aging resident population. The Reset-Dialogues on Civilizations Association has organized its annual Istanbul Seminars in order to fill the need for constructive dialogue dedicated to increasing understanding and implementing social and political change. Turkey’s accession to the European Union (...)
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  50. Cherry Bradshaw (2005). Liberals & Cannibals: The Implications of Diversity. Contemporary Political Theory 4 (1):97.
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