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  1. Maurice Bejart (1946). La danse et sa technique. Les Etudes Philosophiques 1 (3/4):205 - 210.
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  2. Aili Bresnahan (2014). Improvisational Artistry in Live Dance Performance as Embodied and Extended Agency. Dance Research Journal 46 (1):84-94.
    This paper provides an account of improvisational artistry in live dance performance that construes the contribution of the dance performer as a kind of agency. Andy Clark’s theory of the embodied and extended mind is used in order to consider how this account is supported by research on how a thinking-while-doing person navigates the world. I claim here that while a dance performer’s improvisational artistry does include embodied and extended features that occur outside of the brain and nervous system that (...)
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  3. Werner Ceusters & Barry Smith (2011). Switching Partners: Dancing with the Ontological Engineers. In Thomas Batcherer & Roderick Coover (eds.), Switching Codes. Thinking through Digital Technology in the Humanities and the Arts. University of Chicago Press 103--124.
    Ontologies are today being applied in almost every field to support the alignment and retrieval of data of distributed provenance. Here we focus on new ontological work on dance and on related cultural phenomena belonging to what UNESCO calls the “intangible heritage.” Currently data and information about dance, including video data, are stored in an uncontrolled variety of ad hoc ways. This serves not only to prevent retrieval, comparison and analysis of the data, but may also impinge on our ability (...)
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  4. Jonathan Owen Clark (2013). Dance and Intrinsic Significance: A Phenomenological Approach. In Pakes A. Bunker J. (ed.), Thinking Through Dance: Philosophy of Dance Performance and Practices.
    This essay aims to answer a simple question: why dance matters to us. I will argue that of all the philosophical approaches to aesthetics, it is phenomenology that is best equipped to answer this question satisfactorily. Other approaches, which derive from poststructuralism, critical theory, semiotics or historicist hermeneutics tend to assimilate meaning in dance to the specific sociocultural and historical contexts in which dance works were produced, and hence to methodologies aligned with the linguistic or literary turns in intellectual history (...)
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  5. Jonathan Owen Clark (2012). Dance and Subtraction: Notes on Alain Badiou's Inaesthetics. Dance Research Journal 42 (03):50-64.
    In an essay entirely devoted to the subject of dance in Alain Badiou's Handbook of Inaesthetics [Petit manuel d'inesthétique (Badiou 2005b)], we find the following contentious statement: “Dance is not an art, because it is the sign of the possibility of art as inscribed in the body” (69). At first glance, this statement seems strangely familiar to the reader versed in writing about dance, particularly philosophical writing. “Dance is not an art”: Badiou critiques Mallarmé as not realizing this as the (...)
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  6. Jonathan Owen Clark & Taku Ando (2014). Geometry, Embodied Cognition and Choreographic Praxis. International Journal of Performance Arts and Digital Media 10 (2):179-192.
    A common approach to movement creation amongst contemporary choreographers involves dancers being asked to create movement in response to instructions that require them to form mental images, and then to make decisions in response to the internal feedback loops these images generate. The formation of these images is also facilitated in many cases by the use of digital technologies, via data representation and visualization. This article explores connections between technology, choreographic praxis, cognitive science and related topics in the philosophy of (...)
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  7. Claire Colebrook (2005). How Can We Tell the Dancer From the Dance?: The Subject of Dance and the Subject of Philosophy. Topoi 24 (1):5-14.
    One of the most important aspects of Gilles Deleuzes philosophy is his criticism of the traditional concept of praxis. In Aristotelian philosophy praxis is properly oriented towards some end, and in the case of human action the ends of praxis are oriented towards the agents good life. Human goods are, for both Aristotle and contemporary neo-Aristotelians, determined by the potentials of human life such as rationality, communality, and speech. Deleuzes account of action, by contrast, liberates movement from an external end. (...)
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  8. Mónica E. Alarcón Dávila (2012). Kinästhetisches Bewusstsein und sinnliche Refl exion im Tanz. Studia Phaenomenologica 12:253-262.
    Is the relationship of self-moving (kinaesthesis) to itself a direct pre-reflective self-awareness, or is it mediated through an Other? This article attempts to address this question, taking the phenomenon of dance as a point of departure, since in dance, movement steps out of its everyday background function to become the principal theme. Rudolf zur Lippe extracts from a dance step of the dances of the Quattrocento, the posa, a concept of sensual reflection. Rather than a conceptual reflection, the posa can (...)
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  9. MĂdĂlina Diaconu (2004). The Automat, The Lion And The Ballerina. The Connection Between Kinesthetic And Tactility At Husserl, Straus And Kinetography At Rudolf Von Laban. Studia Philosophica 1.
    Jeder Wahrnehmung liegen Kinästhesen zugrunde, doch tritt die Bewegung am deutlichsten im Tasten hervor. Untersucht wird hier die phänomenologische Auffassung vom Zusammenhang zwischen Tasten und Kinästhesen bei Husserl und Erwin Straus, im Vergleich zu der Tanzwissenschaft . Diese Interpretation wird teilweise durch andere Perspektiven ergänzt, die aus der pränatalen Anthropologie, Psychiatrie und den Ingenieurwissenschaften stammen. Das Vorbild ist bei Husserl die mechanische Bewegung zu Erkenntniszwecken; Straus entdeckt die Tierwelt und ihre appetitiven Bewegungen. Keine von diesen Analysen entspricht völlig dem Phänomen (...)
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  10. Robin Grove, Kate Stevens & Shirley McKechnie (eds.) (2005). Thinking in Four Dimensions: Creativity and Cognition in Contemporary Dance. Melbourne UP.
    Introduction Robin Grove and Shirley McKechnie In, the Australian Research Council (ARC) funded a project named Unspoken Knowledges, the aim of which was to ...
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  11. Ivar Hagendoorn (2004). Some Speculative Hypotheses About the Nature and Perception of Dance and Choreography. Journal of Consciousness Studies 11 (3-4):3-4.
    Ever since I first saw a dance performance I have wondered why it is that I am sometimes fascinated and touched by some people moving about on a stage, while at other times it leaves me completely indifferent. I will argue that an answer to this question has to be searched for in the way sensory stimuli are processed in the brain. After all, all our actions, perceptions and feelings are mediated and controlled by the brain. The thoughts and feelings (...)
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  12. Joshua M. Hall (2015). Rearticulating Languages of Art: Dancing with Goodman. Evental Aesthetics 3 (3):28-53.
    In this article, I explore the relationship between dance and the work of Nelson Goodman, which is found primarily in his early book, Languages of Art. Drawing upon the book’s first main thread, I examine Goodman’s example of a dance gesture as a symbol that exemplifies itself. I argue that self-exemplifying dance gestures are unique in that they are often independent and internally motivated, or “meta-self-exemplifying.” Drawing upon the book’s second main thread, I retrace Goodman’s analysis of dance’s relationship to (...)
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  13. Arnold L. Haskell (1962). The Meaning of Ballet. British Journal of Aesthetics 2 (3):259-263.
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  14. Beauquel Julia (2013). Physical and Aesthetic Properties in Dance. In Bunker Jenny, Pakes Anna & Rowell Bonnie (eds.), Dance Books. 165-184.
    Dance as art has been philosophically characterized as involving the natural expressiveness of human movements. But while some authors find the defense of expressiveness essential, others claim that it is not relevant to the understanding of dance and favour instead a focus on style, a supposedly more significant artistic feature. This paper is an attempt to provide an alternative account to both these positions, with the first (namely, that the dancers are supposed to convey emotions to us by their naturally (...)
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  15. Beauquel Julia (2010). Introduction: la danse a-t-elle une philosophie? In Julia Beauquel & Roger Pouivet (eds.), Philosophie de la danse. Aesthetica, Presses Universitaires de Rennes 7-29.
    « La philosophie de la danse ? Cela existe ? » est une question à laquelle celui ou celle qui s’y consacre doit faire face. Une première manière d’y répondre est de montrer en quoi une telle philosophie peut consister, en énumérant rapidement une série de questions et de problèmes. Bien sûr, les tentatives de définition en font partie. Qu’est-ce que la danse ? Peut-elle être définie en termes de conditions nécessaires et suffisantes3 ? En comptant parmi ces conditions l’expressivité (...)
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  16. Beauquel Julia (2010). Le mouvement et l'émotion. In Beauquel Julia & Pouivet Roger (eds.), Philosophie de la danse. Aesthetica, Presses Universitaires de Rennes 65-77.
    Une réflexion philosophique sur l’art de la danse peut être enrichie par la thèse selon laquelle les émotions ne s’opposent pas à la rationalité. C’est du moins la conception qui sera développée ici. Loin d’être en lutte perpétuelle contre la raison, nos émotions témoignent de la complexité propre aux êtres humains que nous sommes : libres, réfléchis, capables de percevoir, de comprendre et de réagir aux choses qui nous entourent de manière objective et rationnelle – dans un sens large du (...)
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  17. Beauquel Julia, Carroll Noel, Elgin Catherine Z., Karlsson Mikael M., Kintzler Catherine, Louis Fabrice, McFee Graham, Moore Margaret, Pouillaude Frédéric, Pouivet Roger & Van Camp Julie (eds.) (2010). Philosophie de la danse. Aesthetica, Presses Universitaires de Rennes.
    En posant avec clarté des questions de philosophie de l’esprit, d’ontologie et d’épistémologie, ce livre témoigne à la fois de l’intérêt réel de la danse comme objet philosophique et du rôle unique que peut jouer la philosophie dans une meilleure compréhension de cet art. Qu’est-ce que danser ? Que nous apprend le mouvement dansé sur la nature humaine et la relation entre le corps et l’esprit ? À quelles conditions une œuvre est-elle correctement interprétée par les danseurs et bien identifiée (...)
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  18. Shen-yi Liao (2014). Explanations: Aesthetic and Scientific. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 75:127-149.
    Methodologically, philosophical aesthetics is undergoing an evolution that takes it closer to the sciences. Taking this methodological convergence as the starting point, I argue for a pragmatist and pluralist view of aesthetic explanations. To bring concreteness to discussion, I focus on vindicating genre explanations, which are explanations of aesthetic phenomena that centrally cite a work's genre classification. I show that theoretical resources that philosophers of science have developed with attention to actual scientific practice and the special sciences can be used (...)
    Dance in Aesthetics
    Explanation, Miscellaneous in General Philosophy of Science
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  19. Amy Mullin (2008). Nietzsche's Dancers: Isadora Duncan, Martha Graham, and the Revaluation of Christian Valuesby Kimerer LaMothe. [REVIEW] Hypatia 23 (3):221-223.
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  20. Markus Schrenk (forthcoming). IS PROPRIOCEPTIVE ART POSSIBLE? In Graham George Priest & Damon Young (eds.), Philosophy and the Martial Arts.
    I argue for the possibility of a proprioceptive art in addition to, for example, visual or auditory arts, where aspects of some martial arts will serve as examples of that art form. My argument is inspired by a thought of Ted Shawn’s, one of the pioneers of American modern dance: "Dance is the only art wherein we ourselves are the stuff in which it is made.” In a first step, I point out that in some practices of martial arts (in (...)
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  21. John Sutton (2005). Moving and Thinking Together in Dance. In Robin Grove, Kate Stevens & Shirley McKechnie (eds.), Thinking in Four Dimensions: creativity and cognition in contemporary dance. Melbourne UP 51-56.
    The collaborative projects described in this e-book have already produced thrilling new danceworks, new technologies, and innovative experimental methods. As the papers collected here show, a further happy outcome is the emergence of intriguing and hybrid kinds of writing. Aesthetic theory, cognitive psychology, and dance criticism merge, as authors are appropriately driven more by the heterogeneous nature of their topics than by any fixed disciplinary affiliation. We can spy here the beginnings of a mixed phenomenology and ethnography of dance practice (...)
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  22. Madeleine Rosa Victoria (2000). Dancing Bodies, a Celebration of Life! A Phenomenological Study of Dance. Dissertation, Depaul University
    The principal object of my investigation throughout this dissertation is the aesthetic object of dance. I have utilized the phenomenological method as a descriptive tool so as to allow the phenomenon to give itself in person and become an object for consciousness for me. This immediately brings me to an important point, namely, that the stance I have adopted is that of the spectator or perceiving subject. The phenomenon of dance does not give itself fully to the dancer. The dancer (...)
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