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  1. Louis Agassiz (1967). Darwinism as a Scientific Theory: Professor Agassiz on the Origin of Species. In Raymond Jackson Wilson (ed.), Darwinism and the American Intellectual. Homewood, Ill.,Dorsey Press.
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  2. Peter Amato (2003). A Darwinian Left. Social Theory and Practice 29 (3):515-522.
    Singer argues that thinking on the Left insufficiently appropriates the broader insights about life and human nature made possible by Darwin. I think Singer has it backwards: the problem is not that Darwin has insufficiently been allowed to influence thinking on the Left, but, rather, that the meaning of “Darwinism” has been distorted by the wider scientific and intellectual communities broadly as a support for Right-wing views including patriarchy and racism since its early days. That Darwin’s theories have so often (...)
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  3. Francisco J. Ayala (1985). Neo‐Darwinism: An Uneven Assessment. Evolutionary Theory: Paths Into the Future. Edited by J. W. POLLARD. John Wiley and Sons, 1984, Pp. 271. £21.50. [REVIEW] Bioessays 3 (1):44-45.
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  4. L. Azar (1986). Book Review Of: Darwinism Defended: A Dude to the Evolution Controversies (Written by Michael Ruse, 1982). [REVIEW] New Scholasticism 60 (2).
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  5. Terence Ball (1979). Marx and Darwin: A Reconsideration. Political Theory 7 (4):469 - 483.
  6. Terence Ball & Terrell Carver (1982). On Warren's Response to "Marx and Darwin: A Reconsideration&Quot;. Political Theory 10 (2):307 - 314.
  7. Jonathan Birch (2014). Has Grafen Formalized Darwin? Biology and Philosophy 29 (2):175-180.
    One key aim of Grafen’s Formal Darwinism project is to formalize ‘modern biology’s understanding and updating of Darwin’s central argument’. In this commentary, I consider whether Grafen has succeeded in this aim.
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  8. Jonathan Birch & Samir Okasha (forthcoming). Kin Selection and Its Critics. BioScience.
    Hamilton’s theory of kin selection is the best-known framework for understanding the evolution of social behavior but has long been a source of controversy in evolutionary biology. A recent critique of the theory by Nowak, Tarnita, and Wilson sparked a new round of debate, which shows no signs of abating. In this overview, we highlight a number of conceptual issues that lie at the heart of the current debate. We begin by emphasizing that there are various alternative formulations of Hamilton’s (...)
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  9. Andrew F. G. Bourke (2014). The Gene's-Eye View, Major Transitions and the Formal Darwinism Project. Biology and Philosophy 29 (2):241-248.
    I argue that Grafen’s formal darwinism project could profitably incorporate a gene’s-eye view, as informed by the major transitions framework. In this, instead of the individual being assumed to maximise its inclusive fitness, genes are assumed to maximise their inclusive fitness. Maximisation of fitness at the individual level is not a straightforward concept because the major transitions framework shows that there are several kinds of biological individual. In addition, individuals have a definable fitness, exhibit individual-level adaptations and arise in a (...)
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  10. Peter J. Bowler (2005). Revisiting the Eclipse of Darwinism. Journal of the History of Biology 38 (1):19 - 32.
    The article sums up a number of points made by the author concerning the response to Darwinism in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, and repeats the claim that a proper understanding of the theory's impact must take account of the extent to which what are now regarded as the key aspects of Darwin's thinking were evaded by his immediate followers. Potential challenges to this position are described and responded to.
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  11. Matthew J. Brown, A Centennial Retrospective of John Dewey's "The Influence of Darwinism on Philosophy&Quot;.
    n 1909, the 50th anniversary of both the publication of Origin of the Species and his own birth, John Dewey published "The Influence of Darwin on Philosophy." This optimistic essay saw Darwin's advance not only as one of empirical or theoretical biology, but a logical and conceptual revolution that would shake every corner of philosophy. Dewey tells us less about the influence that Darwin exerted over philosophy over the past 50 years and instead prophesied the influence it would (or should) (...)
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  12. Magi Cadevall (2009). Darwin, Naturalist: The Case of Fertilization of Orchids. Teorema 28 (2):95-105.
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  13. Werner Callebaut (2011). Beyond Generalized Darwinism. I. Evolutionary Economics From the Perspective of Naturalistic Philosophy of Biology. Biological Theory 6 (4):338-350.
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  14. Werner Callebaut (2011). Beyond Generalized Darwinism. II. More Things in Heaven and Earth. Biological Theory 6 (4):351-365.
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  15. Gregg Caruso (2014). Science and Religion: 5 Questions. Automatic Press/VIP.
    Are science and religion compatible when it comes to understanding cosmology (the origin of the universe), biology (the origin of life and of the human species), ethics, and the human mind (minds, brains, souls, and free will)? Do science and religion occupy non-overlapping magisteria? Is Intelligent Design a scientific theory? How do the various faith traditions view the relationship between science and religion? What, if any, are the limits of scientific explanation? What are the most important open questions, problems, or (...)
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  16. Shai Cherry (2011). Judaism, Darwinism, and the Typology of Suffering. Zygon 46 (2):317-329.
    Abstract. Darwinism has attracted proportionately less attention from Jewish thinkers than from Christian thinkers. One significant reason for the disparity is that the theodicies created by Jews to contend with the catastrophes which punctuated Jewish history are equally suited to address the massive extinctions which characterize natural history. Theologies of divine hiddenness, restraint, and radical immanence, coming together in the sixteenth-century mystical cosmogony of Isaac Luria, have been rehabilitated and reworked by modern Jewish thinkers in the post-Darwin era.
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  17. Joachim L. Dagg (2011). Exploring Mouse Trap History. Evolution Education and Outreach 4 (3):397-414.
    Since intelligent design (ID) advocates claimed the ubiquitous mouse trap as an example of systems that cannot have evolved, mouse trap history is doubly relevant to studying material culture. On the one hand, debunking ID claims about mouse traps and, by implication, also about other irreducibly complex systems has a high educational value. On the other hand, a case study of mouse trap history may contribute insights to the academic discussion about material culture evolution. Michael Behe argued that mouse traps (...)
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  18. Helen De Cruz (2006). Towards a Darwinian Approach to Mathematics. Foundations of Science 11 (1-2):157-196.
    In the past decades, recent paradigm shifts in ethology, psychology, and the social sciences have given rise to various new disciplines like cognitive ethology and evolutionary psychology. These disciplines use concepts and theories of evolutionary biology to understand and explain the design, function and origin of the brain. I shall argue that there are several good reasons why this approach could also apply to human mathematical abilities. I will review evidence from various disciplines (cognitive ethology, cognitive psychology, cognitive archaeology and (...)
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  19. William Dembski, Darwin's Predictable Defenders: A Response to Massimo Pigliucci by William A. Dembski.
    Some Darwinists keep their Darwinism close to the vest. Others wear it on their sleeves. Massimo Pigliucci has it tattooed on his forehead. Indeed, his "Darwin Day" celebrations at the University of Tennessee have become an annual orgy of self-congratulation before Darwin's idol.
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  20. David J. Depew, Bruce H. Weber & Ernst Mayr (1996). Darwinism Evolving. System Dynamics and the Genealogy of Natural Selection. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 18 (1):135.
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  21. Ignaas Devisch (2011). The Progress of Society: An Inquiry Into an 'Old-Fashioned' Thesis of Walter Bagehot. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 19 (3):519 - 541.
    The nineteenth century saw the rise of Darwinism as a new paradigm for the study of nature and man mans an integral part thereof. Many scholars were intent on removing the abstract principles and universal truths of early modern philosophy in favour of understanding man's nature through more scientifically-based methods. Walter Bagehot (1826?1877) was one of the leading exponents of this view. Our focus is on one of Bagehot's famous books, Physics and Politics, or thoughts on the application of the (...)
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  22. Jasper Doomen (2012). Concerning Darwinism. Journal of Human Values 18 (2):173-185.
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  23. Maureen L. Egan (1989). Evolutionary Theory in the Social Philosophy of Charlotte Perkins Gilman. Hypatia 4 (1):102 - 119.
    This paper examines Charlotte Perkins Gilman's connection with the evolutionist ideas of late nineteenth century Reform Darwinism. It focuses on the assumptions that her language and use of metaphor reveal, and upon her vision of human social evolution as a melioristic process through which the equality of the sexes must finally emerge.
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  24. Christopher Eliot (2009). Darwinism and its Discontents. By Michael Ruse. [REVIEW] Metaphilosophy 40 (5):702-710.
  25. Jim Endersby (2003). Escaping Darwin's Shadow. Journal of the History of Biology 36 (2):385-403.
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  26. Paul Farber (2009). Editorial: Darwin Year. Journal of the History of Biology 42 (1):1-2.
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  27. Yiftach J. H. Fehige (2007). The Meaning of the World’s Meaning. [REVIEW] EMBO 8 (5).
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  28. Patrick Forber (2007). Nietzsche Was No Darwinian. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 75 (2):369–382.
    John Richardson (2002, 2004) argues that Nietzsche’s use of teleological notions, such as the “will to power” and psychological “drives,” can be naturalized within the Darwinian framework of natural selection. Although this ambitious project has merit, the Darwinian framework does not provide the strong teleology necessary to interpret Nietzsche’s explanatory project. Examining the logic of selection, the conceptual limitations on biological functions, and the evidential demands that must be met to deploy evolutionary theory show that Nietzsche’s explanatory project does not (...)
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  29. Bouchard Frédéric (2011). Darwinism Without Populations: A More Inclusive Understanding of the “Survival of the Fittest”. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 42 (1):106-114.
    Following Wallace’s suggestion, Darwin framed his theory using Spencer’s expression “survival of the fittest”. Since then, fitness occupies a significant place in the conventional understanding of Darwinism, even though the explicit meaning of the term ‘fitness’ is rarely stated. In this paper I examine some of the different roles that fitness has played in the development of the theory. Whereas the meaning of fitness was originally understood in ecological terms, it took a statistical turn in terms of reproductive success throughout (...)
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  30. Philippe Gagnon (2013). An Improbable God Between Simplicity and Complexity: Thinking About Dawkins's Challenge. International Philosophical Quarterly 53 (4):409-433.
    Richard Dawkins has popularized an argument that he thinks sound for showing that there is almost certainly no God. It rests on the assumptions (1) that complex and statistically improbable things are more difficult to explain than those that are not and (2) that an explanatory mechanism must show how this complexity can be built up from simpler means. But what justifies claims about the designer’s own complexity? One comes to a different understanding of order and of simplicity when one (...)
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  31. Andy Gardner (2014). Life, the Universe and Everything. Biology and Philosophy 29 (2):207-215.
    The Formal Darwinism project probes the connections between the dynamics of natural selection and the design of organisms. Here, I explain why this work should be of interest to philosophers, arguing that it is the natural development in a long-running scholarly enquiry into the meaning of life. I then review some of my own work which has applied the tools of Formal Darwinism to address issues concerning the units of adaptation in social evolution, leading to a deeper understanding of the (...)
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  32. Jean Gayon, Darwin and Darwinism in France After 1900.
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  33. Jean Gayon & Michel Veuille, A Non-Darwinian Darwin.
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  34. Michael T. Ghiselin (1973). Mr. Darwin's Critics, Old and New. Journal of the History of Biology 6 (1):155-165.
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  35. Peter Godfrey-Smith, What Darwinism Explains.
    Did Darwin really do what Kant said was impossible, and serve as a Newton for the biological world? In assessing this question we need to look at both the structure of evolutionary theory and the structure of our explanation-seeking minds. The short answer to the question is yes. Both underestimates and overestimates of the significance of Darwinian explanations derive from psychological habits which may stem from our own evolutionary history.
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  36. Allan Gotthelf (1999). Darwin on Aristotle. Journal of the History of Biology 32 (1):3 - 30.
    Charles Darwin's famous 1882 letter, in response to a gift by his friend, William Ogle of Ogle's recent translation of Aristotle's "Parts of Animals," in which Darwin remarks that his "two gods," Linnaeus and Cuvier, were "mere school-boys to old Aristotle," has been though to be only an extravagantly worded gesture of politeness. However, a close examination of this and other Darwin letters, and of references to Aristotle in Darwin's earlier work, shows that the famous letter was written several (...)
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  37. Alan Grafen (2014). The Formal Darwinism Project in Outline. Biology and Philosophy 29 (2):155-174.
    The broader context for the formal darwinism project established by two of the commentators, in terms of reconciling the Modern Synthesis with Darwinian arguments over design and in terms of links to other types of selection and design, is discussed and welcomed. Some overselling of the project is admitted, in particular of whether it claims to consider all organic design. One important fundamental question raised in two commentaries is flagged but not answered of whether design is rightly represented by an (...)
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  38. E. A. Grosz (2011). Becoming Undone: Darwinian Reflections on Life, Politics, and Art. Duke University Press.
    The inhuman in the humanities : Darwin and the ends of man -- Deleuze, Bergson, and the concept of life -- Bergson, Deleuze, and difference -- Feminism, materialism, and freedom -- The future of feminist theory : dreams for new knowledges -- Differences disturbing identity : Deleuze and feminism -- Irigaray and the ontology of sexual difference -- Darwin and the split between natural and sexual selection -- Sexual difference as sexual selection : Irigarayan reflections on Darwin -- Art and (...)
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  39. Alberto Gutiérrez (1987). Tomándose a Darwin En Serio: Implicaciones Filosoficas Dei Darwinismo. Theoria 2 (2):632-635.
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  40. P. Huneman (2014). Formal Darwinism as a Tool for Understanding the Status of Organisms in Evolutionary Biology. Biology and Philosophy 29 (2):271-279.
    This paper uses the framework of Formal Darwinism (FD) to evaluate organism-centric critiques of the Modern Synthesis (MS). The first section argues that the FD project reconciles two kinds of selective explanations in biology. Thus it is not correct to say that the MS neglects organisms—instead, it explains organisms’ design, as argued in the second section. In the third section I employ a concept of the organism derived from Kant that has two aspects: the parts presupposing the whole, and the (...)
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  41. Tarsicio Jáñez Barrio (2012). San Agustín frente a Darwin: Creacionismo evolutivo de las “razones seminales”. Apuntes Filosóficos 18 (35).
    Es incuestionable el hecho de la evolución, así como la admisión de una realidad previa de la cual partir, sea creada o no. Pero luce cuestionable el mecanismo de la evolución en clave de “selección natural” cuando se la entiende como netamente naturalista. El evolucionismo darwinista no tiene fundamento suficiente para afirmar que las especies evolucionan de modo totalmente aleatorio y sin finalidad definida. Los más recientes descubrimientos socavan los cimientos del darwinismo (J. Enrique Cáceres-Arrieta), y nos hablan de un (...)
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  42. Dirk Robert Johnson (2010). Nietzsche's Anti-Darwinism. Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: Introduction; Part I. Early Darwinism to the 'Anti-Darwin': 1. Towards the 'Anti-Darwin': Darwinian meditations in the middle period; 2. Overcoming the 'Man' in Man: Zarathustra's Transvaluation of Darwinian categories; 3. Nietzsche Agonistes: a personal challenge to Darwin; Part II. Nietzsche's Genealogy of Morals: 4. Nietzsche's 'Nature'; Or, whose playing field is it anyway?; 5. The birth of morality out of the spirit of the 'Bad Conscience'; 6. Darwin's 'Science': or, how to beat the shell game; Conclusion; (...)
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  43. Phillip E. Johnson (1996). Response to Pennock. Biology and Philosophy 11 (4):561-563.
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  44. T. Junker (1994). [Darwinism, Materialism and the Revolution of 1848 in Germany. On the Interaction of Politics and Science]. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 17 (2):271-302.
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  45. John Klasios (2014). The Evolutionary Psychology of Human Mating: A Response to Buller's Critique. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 47:1-11.
    In this paper, I critique arguments made by philosopher David Buller against central evolutionary-psychological explanations of human mating. Specifically, I aim to rebut his criticisms of Evolutionary Psychology regarding (1) women's long-term mating preferences for high-status men; (2) the evolutionary rationale behind men's provisioning of women; (3) men's mating preferences for young women; (4) women's adaptation for extra-pair sex; (5) the sex-differentiated evolutionary theory of human jealousy; and (6) the notion of mate value. In sum, I aim to demonstrate that (...)
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  46. Robert C. Koons & Logan Paul Gage (2011). St. Thomas Aquinas on Intelligent Design. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 85:79-97.
    Recently, the Intelligent Design (ID) movement has challenged the claim of many in the scientific establishment that nature gives no empirical signs of having been deliberately designed. In particular, ID arguments in biology dispute the notion that neo-Darwinian evolution is the only viable scientific explanation of the origin of biological novelty, arguing that there are telltale signs of the activity of intelligence which can be recognized and studied empirically. In recent years, a number of Catholic philosophers, theologians, and scientists have (...)
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  47. Mark A. Largent (1999). Bionomics: Vernon Lyman Kellogg and the Defense of Darwinism. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 32 (3):465 - 488.
    Bionomics was a research approach invented by British biological scientists in the late nineteenth century and adopted by the American entomologist and evolutionist Vernon Lyman Kellogg in the early twentieth century. Kellogg hoped to use bionomics, which was the controlled observation and experimentation of organisms within settings that approximated their natural environments, to overcome the percieved weaknesses in the Darwinian natural selection theory. To this end, he established a bionomics laboratory at Stanford University, widely published results from his bionomic investigations, (...)
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  48. James Lennox, Darwinism. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Darwinism designates a distinctive form of evolutionary explanation for the history and diversity of life on earth. Its original formulation is provided in the first edition of On the Origin of Species in 1859. This entry first formulates ‘Darwin's Darwinism’ in terms of five philosophically distinctive themes: (i) probability and chance, (ii) the nature, power and scope of selection, (iii) adaptation and teleology, (iv) nominalism vs. essentialism about species and (v) the tempo and mode of evolutionary change. Both Darwin and (...)
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  49. Timothy Lenoir (1987). Essay Review: The Darwin Industry. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 20 (1):115-130.
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  50. Tim Lewens (2005). What is Darwinian Naturalism? Biology and Philosophy 20 (4):901-912.
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