Related categories
Subcategories:
1417 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Sort by:
1 — 50 / 1417
Material to categorize
  1. Felicia Ackerman (1999). Death, Dying, and Dignity. The Proceedings of the Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy 1:189-201.
    The word ‘dignity’ is a staple of contemporary American medical ethics, where it often follows the words ‘death with’. People unfamiliar with this usage might expect it to apply to one’s manner of dying—for example, a stately exit involving ceremonial farewells. Instead, conventional usage generally holds that “death with dignity” ends or prevents life without dignity, by which is meant life marked not by buffoonery, but by illness and disability. Popular examples of dignity-depleters include dementia, incontinence, and being “dependent on (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Ann Alpers (1998). Criminal Act or Palliative Care? Prosecutions Involving the Care of the Dying. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 26 (4):308-331.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Sami Alsolamy (2014). Islamic Views on Artificial Nutrition and Hydration in Terminally Ill Patients. Bioethics 28 (2):96-99.
    Withholding and withdrawing artificial nutrition and hydration from terminally ill patients poses many ethical challenges. The literature provides little information about the Islamic beliefs, attitudes, and laws related to these challenges. Artificial nutrition and hydration may be futile and reduce quality of life. They can also harm the terminally ill patient because of complications such as aspiration pneumonia, dyspnea, nausea, diarrhea, and hypervolemia. From the perspective of Islam, rules governing the care of terminally ill patients are derived from the principle (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Zac Alstin (2010). Apres Moi Le Deluge. Bioethics Research Notes 22 (3):42.
    Alstin, Zac The increasing support that euthanasia is gathering in South Australia with a new euthanasia bill about to be passed is discussed. Some of the implicit and explicit challenges and pressures that the introduction of such a bill will pose are highlighted.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. George J. Annas (1991). The Long Dying of Nancy Cruzan. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 19 (1-2):52-59.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. George J. Annas (1987). Trying to Live Forever. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 15 (4):242-247.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. George J. Annas (1980). Doctors and the Death Penalty. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 8 (2):17-17.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Kathryn E. Artnak, Richard M. McGraw & Vayden F. Stanley (2011). Health Care Accessibility for Chronic Illness Management and End-of-Life Care: A View From Rural America. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 39 (2):140-155.
    Nearly $2 trillion is spent annually in the U.S. treating chronic illness — yet accessibility to quality health care services in rural communities for the chronically ill and dying remains problematic. Unique barriers present special challenges to a meaningful discussion of and subsequent strategies for addressing these issues in the context of increasingly scarce resources.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Kalādhara Ārya (2006). Mr̥tyu Māṅgalya. Vitaraka Ḍivāīna Pablikeśana.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Michael Ashby (2011). The Futility of Futility: Death Causation is the 'Elephant in the Room' in Discussions About Limitation of Medical Treatment. [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 8 (2):151-154.
    The term futility has been widely used in medical ethics and clinical medicine for more than twenty years now. At first glance it appears to offer a clear-cut categorical characterisation of medical treatments at the end of life, and an apparently objective way of making decisions that are seen to be emotionally painful for those close to the patient, and ethically, and also potentially legally hazardous for clinicians. It also appears to deal with causation, because omission of a futile treatment (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Joachim Asscher (2007). Killing and Letting Die: The Similarity Criterion. Journal of Applied Philosophy 24 (3):271–282.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Christopher F. Barber (2012). End-of-Life Care for Children and Adults with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities. Nursing Philosophy 13 (1):78-79.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Donald B. Barkan & Elliot L. Sagall (1974). Pulmonary Embolism and Sudden Death. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 2 (2):1-9.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Ines M. Barrio-Cantalejo, Pablo Simón-Lorda, Adoración Molina-Ruiz, Fátima Herrera-Ramos, Encarnación Martínez-Cruz, Rosa Maria Bailon-Gómez, Antonio López-Rico & Patricia Peinado Gorlat (2013). Stability Over Time in the Preferences of Older Persons for Life-Sustaining Treatment. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 10 (1):103-114.
    Objective: To measure the stability of life-sustaining treatment preferences amongst older people and analyse the factors that influence stability. Design: Longitudinal cohort study. Setting: Primary care centres, Granada (Spain). Eighty-five persons age 65 years or older. Participants filled out a questionnaire with six contexts of illness (LSPQ-e). They had to decide whether or not to receive treatment. Participants completed the questionnaire at baseline and 18 months later. Results: 86 percent of the patients did not change preferences. Sex, age, marital status, (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Michael K. Bartalos (2009). Alive and Content : The Art of Living with Mortality Awareness. In , Speaking of Death: America's New Sense of Mortality. Praeger.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Michael K. Bartalos (2009). Acceptance of Mortality : What is Confirmed, What is Denied. In , Speaking of Death: America's New Sense of Mortality. Praeger.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Michael K. Bartalos (2009). Coping with Mortality : A Societal Perspective. In , Speaking of Death: America's New Sense of Mortality. Praeger.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Michael K. Bartalos (2009). The Quest for Permanence : Scientific Visions of Surviving the Eventual Demise of Our Universe. In , Speaking of Death: America's New Sense of Mortality. Praeger.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Kurt Bayertz (1992). Techno-Thanatology: Moral Consequences of Introducing Brain Criteria for Death. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 17 (4):407-417.
    This paper is based on the hypothesis that the effort to establish new criteria for diagnosing human death, which has been taking place over the past twenty years or more, can be viewed as a paradigm case for the impact of scientific and technological progress on morality. This impact takes the form of three tendencies within the change in morality, which may be characterized as ‘denaturalization’, ‘functionalization’ and ‘homogenization’. The paper concludes with the view that these tendencies do not indicate (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Francis J. Beckwith (2013). Stephen W. Smith: End-of-Life Decisions in Medical Care: Principles and Policies for Regulating the Dying Process. [REVIEW] Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 34 (6):499-504.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Robert Belknap (2009). Foreword. In Michael K. Bartalos (ed.), Speaking of Death: America's New Sense of Mortality. Praeger.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. David Benatar (2001). To Be or Not to Have Been? International Journal of Applied Philosophy 15 (2):255-266.
    Most people think that their coming into existence benefited them. This paper reports on and analyses a study that shows that most people, when making such a judgement, do not really consider the counterfactual case -- the scenario in which they never come into existence. Because proper consideration is not given to both options, the ranking of one over the other is not an appropriately informed judgement. The preference for having come into existence is thus a profoundly unreliable indicator of (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. David Benatar (1999). The Unbearable Lightness of Bringing Into Being. Journal of Applied Philosophy 16 (2):173–180.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Purushottama Bilimoria (2011). On Grief and Mourning: Thinking a Feeling, Back to Bob Solomon. Sophia 50 (2):281-301.
    The paper considers various ruminations on the aftermath of the death of a close one, and the processes of grieving and mourning. The conceptual examination of how grief impacts on its sufferers, from different cultural perspectives, is followed by an analytical survey of current thinking among psychologists, psychoanalysts and philosophers on the enigma of grief, and on the associated practice of mourning. Robert C. Solomon reflected deeply on the 'extreme emotion' of grief in his extensive theorizing on the emotions, particularly (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Samuel C. M. Birch (2013). The Dead Donor Rule: A Defense. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 38 (4):426-440.
    Miller, Truog, and Brock have recently argued that the “dead donor rule,” the requirement that donors be determined to be dead before vital organs are procured for transplantation, cannot withstand ethical scrutiny. In their view, the dead donor rule is inconsistent with existing life-saving practices of organ transplantation, lacks a cogent ethical rationale, and is not necessary for maintenance of public trust in organ transplantation. In this paper, the second of these claims will be evaluated. (The first and third are (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Jeffrey Paul Bishop (2011). The Anticipatory Corpse: Medicine, Power, and the Care of the Dying. University of Notre Dame Press.
  27. Robert H. Blank (2011). End-of-Life Decision Making Across Cultures. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 39 (2):201-214.
    Even more so than in other areas of medicine, issues at the end of life elucidate the importance of religion and culture, as well as the role of the family and other social structures, in how these issues are framed. This article presents an overview of the variation in end-of-life treatment issues across 12 highly disparate countries. It finds that many assumptions held in the western bioethics literature are not easily transferred to other cultural settings.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Roberto Bondì & Marcello Zanatta (eds.) (2006). Homo Moriens: Ermeneutiche Della Morte da Omero a Oggi. L. Pellegrini.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. James Bopp & Thomas J. Marzen (1991). Cruzan: Facing the Inevitable. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 19 (1-2):37-51.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Ben Bradley (2009). Well-Being and Death. Oxford University Press.
    Well-Being and Death addresses philosophical questions about death and the good life: what makes a life go well?
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Marina Brandes (2011). Wie Wir Sterben: Chancen Und Grenzen Einer Versöhnung Mit Dem Tod. Vs, Verlag für Sozialwissenschaften.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Nicolae Breban (2009). Profeții Despre Prezent: Elogiul Morții. Polirom.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Bob Brecher (2002). Our Obligation to the Dead. Journal of Applied Philosophy 19 (2):109–119.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Troyen A. Brennan (1988). Silent Decisions: Limits of Consent and the Terminally III Patient. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 16 (3-4):204-209.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Troyen A. Brennan (1986). Do-Not-Resuscitate Orders for the Incompetent Patient in the Absence of Family Consent. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 14 (1):13-19.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Courtenay R. Bruce (2012). “In Love With Easeful Death:” Review of the FilmHow to Die in Oregon. [REVIEW] American Journal of Bioethics 12 (12):66-67.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. E. C. Brugger (2013). D. Alan Shewmon and the PCBE's White Paper on Brain Death: Are Brain-Dead Patients Dead? Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 38 (2):205-218.
    The December 2008 White Paper (WP) on “Brain Death” published by the President’s Council on Bioethics (PCBE) reaffirmed its support for the traditional neurological criteria for human death. It spends considerable time explaining and critiquing what it takes to be the most challenging recent argument opposing the neurological criteria formulated by D. Alan Shewmon, a leading critic of the “whole brain death” standard. The purpose of this essay is to evaluate and critique the PCBE’s argument. The essay begins with a (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (11 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Michael M. Burgess (1993). The Medicalization of Dying. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 18 (3):269-279.
    Physician assisted suicide or active euthanasia is analyzed as a medicalization of the needs of persons who are suffering interminably. As with other medicalized responses to personal needs, the availability of active euthanasia will likely divert attention and resources from difficult social and personal aspects of the needs of dying and suffering persons, continuing the pattern of privatization of the costs of caregiving for persons who are candidates for active euthanasia, limiting the ability of caregivers to assist suffering persons to (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Thomas A. Caffrey (2009). When the Time is Ripe for Acceptance : Dying, with a Small "D". In Michael K. Bartalos (ed.), Speaking of Death: America's New Sense of Mortality. Praeger.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Laura Campanello (2005). Non Ci Lasceremo Mai?: L'Esercizio Filosofico Della Morte Tra Autobiografia E Filosofia. Unicopli.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Courtney S. Campbell (2009). Northwest Passages. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 16 (1):66-78.
    Recent developments in Washington State and Montana have revived interest in death with dignity legislation. Oregon has a decade of experience with this professional experiment in the ethics of end-of-life care that is relevant for subsequent citizen referenda or legislation. This essay discusses the professional, regulatory and ethical issues displayed by the implementation of death with dignity in Oregon. My analysis generates conclusions that while the Oregon statute and its implementation has advanced patient choice andempowered professionals, it has failed a (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Norman L. Cantor (2001). Twenty-Five Years After Quinlan: A Review of the Jurisprudence of Death and Dying. [REVIEW] Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 29 (2):182-196.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Norman L. Cantor (1993). Review Essay / Regulating Death. Criminal Justice Ethics 12 (1):71-77.
    Carlos F. Gomez, Regulating Death New Yorrk: Free Press, 1991, xx +172 pp.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Alexander Morgan Capron (1991). Medical Decision-Making and the Right to Die After Cruzan. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 19 (1-2):5-8.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Alexander Morgan Capron (1986). Legal and Ethical Problems in Decisions for Death. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 14 (3-4):141-144.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Colleen Cartwright (2012). Ethical Challenges in End-of-Life Care for GLBTI Individuals. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 9 (1):113-114.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Christine K. Cassel (1989). Care of the Dying: The Limits of Law, the Limits of Ethics. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 17 (3):232-233.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Junhui Chen (2008). Chao Yue Sheng Si de Zhi Hui. Yu He Wen Hua Chu Ban You Xian Gong Si.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Yen-Yuan Chen & Wen-Je Ko (2011). Further Deliberating Burying the Dead Donor Rule in Donation After Circulatory Death. American Journal of Bioethics 11 (8):58-59.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 11, Issue 8, Page 58-59, August 2011.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Evgeniĭ Chernosvitov (2004). Formula Smerti. Rit͡s Mdk.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1417