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  1. Hunida E. Abdulhameed, Muhammad M. Hammami & Elbushra A. Hameed Mohamed (2011). Disclosure of Terminal Illness to Patients and Families: Diversity of Governing Codes in 14 Islamic Countries. Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (8):472-475.
  2. Tineke A. Abma (2005). Struggling with the Fragility of Life: A Relational-Narrative Approach to Ethics in Palliative Nursing. Nursing Ethics 12 (4):337-348.
    In nursing ethics the role of narratives and dialogue has become more prominent in recent years. The purpose of this article is to illuminate a relational-narrative approach to ethics in the context of palliative nursing. The case study presented concerns a difficult relationship between oncology nurses and a husband whose wife was hospitalized with cancer. The husband’s narrative is an expression of depression, social isolation and the loss of hope. He found no meaning in the process of dying and death. (...)
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  3. Tineke A. Abma (2001). Evaluating Palliative Care: Facilitating Reflexive Dialgoues About an Ambiguous Concept. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 4 (3):261-276.
    Palliation is a relatively new concept that is used in connection with the integral care provided to those who are unable to recover from their illness. The specific meaning of the concept has not been clearly defined. This article explores the possibilities offered by a responsive approach to evaluation that can facilitate a reflexive dialogue on this ambiguous concept. In doing so it draws on a case study of a palliative care project in a Dutch health care authority. The article (...)
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  4. Felicia Ackerman (1998). Response to “This Porridge Is Too Thin” by Gretchen M. Brown and “Demolishing a 'Straw Man'” by Elliott J. Rosen (CQ Vol 7, No 2). [REVIEW] Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 7 (03):323-325.
    Each of these hospice officials makes several criticisms of my paper, Philosophy of Hospice I will treat these criticisms in turn.
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  5. Felicia Ackerman (1991). The Significance of a Wish. Hastings Center Report 21 (4):27-29.
  6. F. Alejandra (2011). Is There Evil in Dying? Ethical and Legal Reflections Concerning Induced Death. Ideas Y Valores 60 (146):43-57.
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  7. Pamela Sue Anderson (2006). Life, Death and (Inter)Subjectivity: Realism and Recognition in Continental Feminism. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 60 (1/3):41 - 59.
    I begin with the assumption that a philosophically significant tension exists today in feminist philosophy of religion between those subjects who seek to become divine and those who seek their identity in mutual recognition. My critical engagement with the ambiguous assertions of Luce Irigaray seeks to demonstrate, on the one hand, that a woman needs to recognize her own identity but, on the other hand, that each subject whether male or female must struggle in relation to the other in order (...)
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  8. Leonard Angel (2015). Is There Adequate Empirical Evidence for Reincarnation? An Analysis of Ian Stevenson’s Work. In Keith Augustine & Michael Martin (eds.), The Myth of an Afterlife: The Case against Life After Death. Rowman & Littlefield. 575-583.
    This article reviews the research of “top rebirth scientist” Ian Stevenson on spontaneous past-life memory cases, focusing on three key problems with Stevenson’s work. First, his research of entirely anecdotal case reports contains a number of errors and omissions. Second, like other reincarnation researchers, Stevenson has done no controlled experimental work on such cases; yet only such research could ever resolve whether the correspondences found between a child’s statements and a deceased person’s life exceed what we might find by chance. (...)
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  9. E. J. Applewhite (1991). Paradise Mislaid: Birth, Death & the Human Predicament of Being Biological. St. Martin's Press.
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  10. István Aranyosi (2012). Should We Fear Quantum Torment? Ratio 25 (3):249-259.
    The prospect, in terms of subjective expectations, of immortality under the no-collapse interpretation of quantum mechanics is certain, as pointed out by several authors, both physicists and, more recently, philosophers. The argument, known as quantum suicide, or quantum immortality, has received some critical discussion, but there hasn't been any questioning of David Lewis's point that there is a terrifying corollary to the argument, namely, that we should expect to live forever in a crippled, more and more damaged state, that barely (...)
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  11. Kalādhara Ārya (2006). Mr̥tyu Māṅgalya. Vitaraka Ḍivāīna Pablikeśana.
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  12. N. Athanassoulis (2005). Jeff McMahan, the Ethics of Killing: Problems at the Margins of Life, New York, Oxford University Press, 2002, Pp. VII+540. Utilitas 17 (1):117-119.
  13. Keith Augustine (2015). Near-Death Experiences Are Hallucinations. In Keith Augustine & Michael Martin (eds.), The Myth of an Afterlife: The Case against Life After Death. Rowman & Littlefield. 529-569.
    Reports of near-death experiences (NDEs) with suggestive or manifestly hallucinatory features strongly imply that NDEs are not glimpses of an afterlife, but rather internally generated fantasies. Such features include discrepancies between what is seen in the seemingly physical environment of “out-of-body” NDEs and what is actually happening in the physical world at the time, bodily sensations felt after near-death experiencers (NDErs) have ostensibly departed the physical world altogether and entered a transcendental realm, encounters with living persons and fictional characters while (...)
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  14. Keith Augustine (2007). Does Paranormal Perception Occur in Near-Death Experiences? Journal of Near Death Studies 25 (4):203-236.
    While most near-death researchers have disregarded reports of near-death experiences (NDEs) with hallucinatory features, many have sought cases of veridical paranormal perception during NDEs. But despite more than a quarter century of near-death studies, no compelling evidence that NDErs can obtain information from remote locations during their NDEs has been forthcoming. This paper, Part I of a critique of survivalist interpretations of NDEs, reviews the quality of the evidence for veridical observations during NDEs, and finds the case for veridical paranormal (...)
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  15. Keith Augustine (2007). Near-Death Experiences with Hallucinatory Features. Journal of Near Death Studies 26 (1):3-31.
    Though little systematic attention has been given to near-death experiences (NDEs) with clear or suggestive hallucinatory features, reports of such experiences strongly imply that NDEs are not glimpses of an afterlife. This paper, Part II of a critique of survivalist interpretations of NDEs, surveys NDEs incorporating out-of-body discrepancies, bodily sensations, encounters with living persons and fictional characters, random or insignificant memories, returns from a point of no return, hallucinatory imagery, and unfulfilled predictions. Though attempts to accommodate hallucinatory NDEs within a (...)
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  16. Keith Augustine (2007). Psychophysiological and Cultural Correlates Undermining a Survivalist Interpretation of Near-Death Experiences. Journal of Near Death Studies 26 (2):89-125.
    This paper, Part III of a critique of survivalist interpretations of near-death experiences (NDEs), considers psychophysiological and cultural correlates of NDEs suggesting that such experiences are solely products of individuals' minds rather than windows into a transcendental realm. While current psychophysiological models do not fully explain out-of-body experiences (OBEs) and NDEs, several psychophysiological correlates offer promising clues about the mechanisms implicated in their production. These correlates do not definitively identify their precise causes, but strongly imply that such experiences represent internally (...)
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  17. Pat Easterling Backhouse, Michael Frede, Sara Owen & Christopher Taylor (2002). Democritus, the Epicureans, Death, and Dying. Classical Quarterly 52:193-206.
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  18. Francis Bacon (1638/1977). The Historie of Life and Death. Arno Press.
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  19. Paul Bahn (1984). Do Not Disturb? Archaeology and the Rights of the Dead. Journal of Applied Philosophy 1 (2):213-225.
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  20. Mohammed A. Bamyeh (2007). Of Death and Dominion: The Existential Foundations of Governance. Northwestern University Press.
    Death is the opposite not of life, but of power. And as such, Mohammed Bamyeh argues in this original work, death has had a great and largely unexplored impact on the thinking of governance throughout history, right down to our day. In Of Death and Dominion Bamyeh pursues the idea that a deep concern with death is, in fact, the basis of the ideological foundations of all political systems. Concentrating on four types of political systems—polis, empire, theocracy, and modern mass (...)
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  21. R. Barcaro (2000). A. Scola, Quale vita? La bioetica in questione. [REVIEW] Epistemologia 23 (1):179-180.
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  22. R. Barcaro (1997). G. L. Brena, Il tempo della morte. [REVIEW] Epistemologia 20 (1):186-187.
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  23. Michael K. Bartalos (2009). Alive and Content : The Art of Living with Mortality Awareness. In Speaking of Death: America's New Sense of Mortality. Praeger.
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  24. Michael K. Bartalos (2009). Acceptance of Mortality : What is Confirmed, What is Denied. In Speaking of Death: America's New Sense of Mortality. Praeger.
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  25. Michael K. Bartalos (2009). Coping with Mortality : A Societal Perspective. In Speaking of Death: America's New Sense of Mortality. Praeger.
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  26. Michael K. Bartalos (ed.) (2009). Speaking of Death: America's New Sense of Mortality. Praeger.
    As the team in this volume shows through groundbreaking research, surveys, interviews, and vignettes, death awareness has grown strong, and has changed the way ...
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  27. Michael K. Bartalos (2009). The Quest for Permanence : Scientific Visions of Surviving the Eventual Demise of Our Universe. In Speaking of Death: America's New Sense of Mortality. Praeger.
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  28. Imants Baruss (2003). Alterations of Consciousness: An Empirical Analysis for Social Scientists. American Psychological Association.
  29. Imants Barušs (2003). Death. In Imants Baruss (ed.), Alterations of Consciousness: An Empirical Analysis for Social Scientists. American Psychological Association. 211-232.
  30. Paul B. Bascom, David DeGrazia, Ezekiel J. Emanuel, Kathleen Foley, Herbert Hendin, Michael Panicola, Stephen G. Post, Susan W. Tolle & Charles von Gunten (2004). Death and Dying: A Reader. Sheed & Ward.
    Edited by Thomas A. Shannon, this series provides anthologies of critical essays and reflections by leading ethicists in four pivotal areas: reproductive technologies, genetic technologies, death and dying, and health care policy. The goal of this series is twofold: first, to provide a set of readers on thematic topics for introductory or survey courses in bioethics or for courses with a particular theme or time limitation. Second, each of the readers in this series is designed to help students focus more (...)
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  31. Christian Battista, Nicolas Gauvrit & Etienne LeBel (2015). Madness in the Method: Fatal Flaws in Recent Mediumship Experiments. In Keith Augustine & Michael Martin (eds.), The Myth of an Afterlife: The Case against Life After Death. Rowman & Littlefield. 615-630.
    This paper reviews one of the most methodologically rigorous studies of mediumship conducted to date. On the surface, the statistical procedures used by Julie Beischel and Gary E. Schwartz in the study seem to support the existence of anomalous information reception (AIR), but in fact have been misapplied. Other methodological flaws are fatal, including unaccounted for researcher degrees of freedom, which completely calls into question Beischel and Schwartz’s conclusion regarding AIR. We conclude by proposing an experimental design more appropriate for (...)
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  32. John Baum (2003). When Death Enters Life. Floris.
  33. Ernest Becker (1973). The Denial of Death. New York,Free Press.
    Drawing from religion and the human sciences, particularly psychology after Freud, the author attempts to demonstrate that the fear of death is man's central ...
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  34. Kathy Behrendt (2011). Reasons to Live Versus Reasons Not to Die. Think 10 (28):67-76.
    ‘Any reason for living is an excellent reason for not dying’ (Steven Luper-Foy, 'Annihilation'). Some claims seem so clearly right that we don’t think to question them. Steven Luper-Foy’s remark is like that. It borders on the ‘trivially true’ (i.e. so obviously true as to be uninteresting). If I have a reason to live, surely I likewise have a reason not to die. It may then be surprising to learn that so many philosophers disagree with this claim—either directly or by (...)
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  35. Kathy Behrendt (2010). A Special Way of Being Afraid. Philosophical Psychology 23 (5):669-682.
    I am interested in fear of non-existence, which is often discussed in terms of fear one’s own death, or as it is sometimes called, fear of death as such. This form of fear has been denied by some philosophers. Cognitive theories of the emotions have particular trouble in dealing with it, granting it a status that is simultaneously paradigmatic yet anomalous with respect to fear in general. My paper documents these matters, and considers a number of responses. I provide examples (...)
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  36. Kathy Behrendt (2007). Reasons to Be Fearful: Strawson, Death and Narrative. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 82 (60):133-.
    I compare and assess two significant and opposing approaches to the self with respect to what they have to say about death: the anti-narrativist, as articulated by Galen Strawson, and the narrativist, as pieced together from a variety of accounts. Neither party fares particularly well on the matter of death. Both are unable to point towards a view of death that is clearly consistent with their views on the self. In the narrativist’s case this inconsistency is perhaps not as explicit (...)
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  37. Laurence John Bendit (1965). The Mirror of Life and Death. Madras, Theosophical Pub. House.
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  38. Lars Bergström (2013). Death and Eternal Recurrence. In Feldman Bradley (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Death. Oxford U P.
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  39. Susan Blackmore (2015). Out-of-Body Experiences Are Not Evidence for Survival. In Keith Augustine & Michael Martin (eds.), The Myth of an Afterlife: The Case against Life After Death. Rowman & Littlefield. 519-527.
    This paper reviews the evidence that something leaves the body during out-of-body experiences (OBEs) and thus could potentially survive death. First, during OBEs people can purportedly see things at a distance without using the recognized senses. Second, some claim that the double or astral body can be detected. Finally, there is evidence from OBEs occurring near death. This paper evaluates each in turn.
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  40. Stephan Blatti (2014). Mortal Harm and the Antemortem Experience of Death. Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (9):640-42.
    In his recent book, Death, Posthumous Harm, and Bioethics (Routeledge 2012), James Stacey Taylor challenges two ideas whose provenance may be traced all the way back to Aristotle. The first of these is the thought that death (typically) harms the one who dies (mortal harm thesis). The second is the idea that one can be harmed (and wronged) by events that occur after one’s death (posthumous harm thesis). Taylor devotes two-thirds of the book to arguing against both theses and the (...)
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  41. Lisa Bortolotti (2010). Agency, Life Extension, and the Meaning of Life. The Monist 93 (1):38-56.
    Contemporary philosophers and bioethicists argue that life extension is bad for the individual. According to the agency objection to life extension, being constrained as an agent adds to the meaningfulness of human life. Life extension removes constraints, and thus it deprives life of meaning. In the paper, I concede that constrained agency contributes to the meaningfulness of human life, but reject the agency objection to life extension in its current form. Even in an extended life, decision-making remains constrained, and many (...)
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  42. Lisa Bortolotti (ed.) (2009). Philosophy and Happiness. Palgrave MacMillan.
    Philosophy and Happiness addresses the need to situate any meaningful discourse about happiness in a wider context of human interests, capacities and circumstances. How is happiness manifested and expressed? Can there be any happiness if no worthy life projects are pursued? How is happiness affected by relationships, illness, or cultural variants? Can it be reduced to preference satisfaction? Is it a temporary feeling or a persistent way of being? Is reflection conducive to happiness? Is mortality necessary for it? These are (...)
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  43. Judith A. Boss (2002). A Phenomenological Study of Near-Death Experiences, Ultimate Reality and Life After Death. Ultimate Reality and Meaning 25 (3):214-224.
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  44. Ben Bradley (2007). How Bad is Death? Canadian Journal of Philosophy 37 (1):111-127.
    A popular view about why death is bad for the one who dies is that death deprives its subject of the good things in life. This is the “deprivation account” of the evil of death. There is another view about death that seems incompatible with the deprivation account: the view that a person’s death is less bad if she has lived a good life. In The Ethics of Killing, Jeff McMahan argues that a deprivation account should discount the evil of (...)
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  45. Ben Bradley (2004). When is Death Bad for the One Who Dies? Noûs 38 (1):1–28.
    Epicurus seems to have thought that death is not bad for the one who dies, since its badness cannot be located in time. I show that Epicurus’ argument presupposes Presentism, and I argue that death is bad for its victim at all and only those times when the person would have been living a life worth living had she not died when she did. I argue that my account is superior to competing accounts given by Thomas Nagel, Fred Feldman and (...)
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  46. William Brennan (1980). Medical Holocausts. Nordland Pub. International.
    v. 1. Exterminative medicine in Nazi Germany and contemporary America -- v. 2. The language of exterminative medicine in Nazi Germany and contemporary America.
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  47. Herbert Brewer (1964). Perinatal Mortality: The First Report of the 1958 British Perinatal Mortality Survey Under the Auspices of the National Birthday Trust Fund. The Eugenics Review 56 (1):42.
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  48. Lajos L. Brons (2014). The Incoherence of Denying My Death. Journal of Philosophy of Life 4 (2):68-98.
    The most common way of dealing with the fear of death is denying death. Such denial can take two and only two forms: strategy 1 denies the finality of death; strategy 2 denies the reality of the dying subject. Most religions opt for strategy 1, but Buddhism seems to be an example of the 2nd. All variants of strategy 1 fail, however, and a closer look at the main Buddhist argument reveals that Buddhism in fact does not follow strategy 2. (...)
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  49. Norman Oliver Brown (1959). Life Against Death the Psychoanalytical Meaning of History. Wesleyan University Press.
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  50. Samuel Brown, The Beautiful Death in the Smith Family.
    Mormon founder Joseph Smith lived and worked in a cultural world distinct in several important ways from that familiar to modern readers. Death in many senses dominated this worldview, and the primary documents confirm the centrality of death to Smith and his family. In this paper, I demonstrate the extent to which the Smiths participated in this culture, known as the "beautiful" or "good" or "holy" death. Understanding this context illuminates the social and emotional valence of Smith's religious innovations, depathologizes (...)
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