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  1. Lisa K. Adams (1997). Dealing with Lying. Powerkids Press.
    This important series looks at difficulties that kids deal with all too often and provides useful tips in age-appropriate language.
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  2. Max Albert & Hannes Rusch, Indirect Reciprocity, Golden Opportunities for Defection, and Inclusive Reputation. MAGKS Discussion Paper Series in Economics.
    In evolutionary models of indirect reciprocity, reputation mechanisms can stabilize cooperation even in severe cooperation problems like the prisoner’s dilemma. Under certain circumstances, conditionally cooperative strategies, which cooperate iff their partner has a good reputation, cannot be invaded by any other strategy that conditions behavior only on own and partner reputation. The first point of this paper is to show that an evolutionary version of backward induction can lead to a breakdown of this kind of indirectly reciprocal cooperation. Backward induction, (...)
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  3. M. Alfino (1996). Research Crimes, Misdemeanors, and Tolerated Deceptions. Journal of Information Ethics 5 (1):5-8.
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  4. Janine Amos (2002). Admitting Mistakes. G. Stevens Pub..
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  5. Janine Amos (1996/2007). Liar. Cherrytree.
    Stories of young children who make up exaggerated stories provide questions for a discussion about lying.
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  6. Daniel Attas (1999). What's Wrong with "Deceptive" Advertising? Journal of Business Ethics 21 (1):49 - 59.
    In this paper I present a moral account of the legal notion of deceptive advertising. I argue that no harmful consequences to the consumer need follow from a deceptive advertisement as such, and I suggest instead that one should focus on the consequences of permitting the practise of deceptive advertising on society as a whole. After a brief account of deceptive advertising, I move to discuss the role of the reasonable person standard in its definition. One interpretation of this standard (...)
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  7. Kate Averis & Matthew Moran (eds.) (2010). Le Mensonge: Multidisciplinary Perspectives in French Studies. Cambridge Scholars.
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  8. William D. Backus (2006). Telling Each Other the Truth. Bethany House.
    Say what you want to say -- Nothing's wrong with saying "I" -- Attacking and defending vs. speaking the truth in love -- Manipulation by guilt -- Ask and it shall be given you : how to make requests -- Free to say no -- Dealing with critical people -- How Matthew 18:15 keeps you from blowing up -- "If he listens to you" : the loving art of listening -- Wrapping the truth in love -- Telling the truth in (...)
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  9. F. G. Bailey (1991). The Prevalence of Deceit. Cornell University Press.
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  10. José Barata-Moura (2007). Da Mentira: Um Ensaio: Transbordante de Errores. Editorial Caminho.
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  11. Eric M. Beasley (2014). Students Reported for Cheating Explain What They Think Would Have Stopped Them. Ethics and Behavior 24 (3):229-252.
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  12. Lyn Black (1972). Differences in Attitudes to Lying in Children Aged 8 and 11 Years. Journal of Moral Education 1 (2):135-140.
    (1972). Differences in Attitudes to Lying in Children aged 8 and 11 years. Journal of Moral Education: Vol. 1, No. 2, pp. 135-140. doi: 10.1080/0305724720010208.
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  13. Sissela Bok (1999/1979). Lying: Moral Choice in Public and Private Life. Vintage Books.
    A thoughtful addition to the growing debate over public and private morality. Looks at lying and deception in law, family, medicine, government.
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  14. Leslie Anne Boldt-Irons, Corrado Federici & Ernesto Virgulti (eds.) (2009). Disguise, Deception, Trompe-L'oeil: Interdisciplinary Perspectives. Peter Lang.
    The complexity of these terms and their relationship with truth and truthfulness are put on display by the contributors to this volume.
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  15. Lisa Bortolotti & Matteo Mameli (2006). Deception in Psychology : Moral Costs and Benefits of Unsought Self-Knowledge. Accountability in Research 13:259-275.
    Is it ethical to deceive the individuals who participate in psychological experiments for methodological reasons? We argue against an absolute ban on the use of deception in psychological research. The potential benefits of many psychological experiments involving deception consist in allowing individuals and society to gain morally significant self-knowledge that they could not otherwise gain. Research participants gain individual self-knowledge which can help them improve their autonomous decision-making. The community gains collective self-knowledge that, once shared, can play a role in (...)
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  16. Lloyd Bradley (ed.) (2005). Book of Lies. Andrews Mcmeel Pub..
    Book of Lies is an essential guidebook to the world of mendacity. This fascinating trove of falsehoods covers areas such as how to get away with a lie and categories such as Presidential Lies, Sex Lies, Lies to Children, and even True Lies. Book of Lies also incorporates tips on how to spot a liar-a change in vocal pitch, speed, and a lot of "ums" and "ahs" thrown in. Covering little-known information such as lies told by royalty to more common (...)
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  17. Virginia K. Bratton & Connie Strittmatter (2013). To Cheat or Not to Cheat?: The Role of Personality in Academic and Business Ethics. Ethics and Behavior 23 (6):427-444.
    Past research (Lawson, 2004; Nonis & Swift, 2001) has revealed a correlation between academic and business ethics. Using a sample survey, this study extends this inquiry by examining the role of dispositional variables (neuroticism, extraversion, and conscientiousness) and academic honesty on business ethics perceptions. Results indicate that (1) neuroticism and conscientiousness were positively related to more ethical perceptions in a work context, and (2) academic honesty partially mediated the relationship between conscientiousness and business ethics. Implications to business practitioners and educators (...)
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  18. Bo Brinkman (2013). An Analysis of Student Privacy Rights in the Use of Plagiarism Detection Systems. Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (3):1255-1266.
    Plagiarism detection services are a powerful tool to help encourage academic integrity. Adoption of these services has proven to be controversial due to ethical concerns about students’ rights. Central to these concerns is the fact that most such systems make permanent archives of student work to be re-used in plagiarism detection. This computerization and automation of plagiarism detection is changing the relationships of trust and responsibility between students, educators, educational institutions, and private corporations. Educators must respect student privacy rights when (...)
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  19. Matthew Broaddus, Mark D. Harmon & Kristin Farley Mounts (2011). VNRs: Is the News Audience Deceived? Journal of Mass Media Ethics 26 (4):283-296.
    Every day, television news operations have available dozens of video news releases (VNRs), public relations handout videos designed to mimic news formats. Electronic tracking indicates some of these VNRs are used. Critics typically assail VNRs on ethical grounds, that VNRs deceive audience members into thinking they are watching news gathered by reporters, rather than a promotional pitch. Using a snowball technique, the researchers presented survey respondents with authentic-looking local television news stories; 157 respondents evaluated three stories (out of nine). Some (...)
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  20. Francis V. Burke (1995). Lying During Crisis Negotiations: A Costly Means to Expedient Resolution. Criminal Justice Ethics 14 (1):49-62.
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  21. Thomas L. Carson (2010). Lying and Deception: Theory and Practice. Oxford University Press.
    The book concludes with a qualified defence of the view that honesty is a virtue.
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  22. Thomas L. Carson (2009). Lying, Deception, and Related Concepts. In Clancy W. Martin (ed.), The Philosophy of Deception. Oxford University Press. 153--87.
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  23. J. Caleb Clanton (2009). A Moral Case Against Certain Uses of Plagiarism Detection Services. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 23 (1):17-26.
    The statistics on plagiarism are staggering. No wonder, then, that many colleges and universities have started using plagiarism detection services (PDSs) such as Turnitin. But there are problems—and more problems than most critics have recognized. Whereas critics typically focus on legal issues related to intellectual property and privacy rights, I argue that unless we can reasonably suspect academic dishonesty, it’s morally problematic to require submission through a PDS. Even if we insist that the benefits of PDS use are worth the (...)
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  24. S. R. L. Clark (2005). Book Review: Lying: An Augustinian Theology of Duplicity. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 18 (3):151-153.
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  25. Steve Clarke (1999). Justifying Deception in Social Science Research. Journal of Applied Philosophy 16 (2):151–166.
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  26. Larry Cunningham (1999). Taking on Testifying: The Prosecutor's Response to in‐Court Police Deception. Criminal Justice Ethics 18 (1):26-40.
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  27. Elmer Holmes Davis (1951). Must We Mislead the Public? [Twin Cities Local, American Newspaper Guild and School of Journalism, University of Minnesota.
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  28. Jeanette A. Davy, Joel F. Kincaid, Kenneth J. Smith & Michelle A. Trawick (2007). An Examination of the Role of Attitudinal Characteristics and Motivation on the Cheating Behavior of Business Students. Ethics and Behavior 17 (3):281 – 302.
    This study examines cheating behaviors among 422 business students at two public Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business-accredited business schools. Specifically, we examined the simultaneous influence of attitudinal characteristics and motivational factors on (a) reported prior cheating behavior, (b) the tendency to neutralize cheating behaviors, and (c) likelihood of future cheating. In addition, we examined the impact of in-class deterrents on neutralization of cheating behaviors and the likelihood of future cheating. We also directly tested potential mediating effects of neutralization (...)
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  29. David Decosimo (2010). Just Lies: Finding Augustine's Ethics of Public Lying in His Treatments of Lying and Killing. Journal of Religious Ethics 38 (4):661-697.
    Augustine famously defends the justice of killing in certain public contexts such as just wars. He also claims that private citizens who intentionally kill are guilty of murder, regardless of their reasons. Just as famously, Augustine seems to prohibit lying categorically. Analyzing these features of his thought and their connections, I argue that Augustine is best understood as endorsing the justice of lying in certain public contexts, even though he does not explicitly do so. Specifically, I show that parallels between (...)
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  30. Robert Dessaix (2009). On Humbug. Melbourne University Pub..
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  31. Tom Dougherty (2013). Sex Lies and Consent. Ethics 123 (4):717-744.
    How wrong is it to deceive someone into sex by lying, say, about one's profession? The answer is seriously wrong when the liar's actual profession would be a deal breaker for the victim of the deception: this deception vitiates the victim's sexual consent, and it is seriously wrong to have sex with someone while lacking his or her consent.
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  32. Tom Dougherty (2013). Sex Lies and Consent. Ethics 123 (4):717-744.
    How wrong is it to deceive someone into sex by lying, say, about one's profession? The answer is seriously wrong when the liar's actual profession would be a deal breaker for the victim of the deception: this deception vitiates the victim's sexual consent, and it is seriously wrong to have sex with someone while lacking his or her consent.
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  33. Eugene J. Duffy (1978). Attitudes to Lying in Children Aged 8/9 and 11/12. Journal of Moral Education 8 (1):52-54.
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  34. Marcel Eck (1970). Lies and Truth. New York]Macmillan.
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  35. Jacob Eisenberg * (2004). To Cheat or Not to Cheat: Effects of Moral Perspective and Situational Variables on Students' Attitudes. Journal of Moral Education 33 (2):163-178.
    One hundred and ninety?six Israeli middle?school students participated in a study that explored the effects of moral orientation (moral versus conventional)and of three situational variables on attitudes toward two types of cheating in school exams?copying from others (?active?)and letting others copy (?passive?). Several vignettes that were comprised of different combinations of the three situational variables?exam importance, supervision level and peers' norms?were used as the main instrument. It was found that a?morally oriented students approved significantly more of cheating than morally oriented (...)
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  36. Paul Ekman (2009). Lie Catching and Microexpressions. In Clancy W. Martin (ed.), The Philosophy of Deception. Oxford University Press. 118--133.
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  37. Deni Elliott (1991). On Deceiving One's Source. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 6 (1):1-9.
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  38. William Epstein (2006). The Lighter Side of Deception Research in the Social Sciences: Social Work as Comedy. Journal of Information Ethics 15 (1):11-26.
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  39. Jo P. Everett, Clifford A. Walters, Debra L. Stottlemyer, Curtis A. Knight, Andrew A. Oppenberg & Robert D. Orr (2011). To Lie or Not to Lie: Resident Physician Attitudes About the Use of Deception in Clinical Practice. Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (6):333-338.
    Background Physicians face competing values of truth-telling and beneficence when deception may be employed in patient care. The purposes of this study were to assess resident physicians' attitudes towards lying, explore lie types and reported reasons for lying. Method After obtaining institutional review board review (OSR# 58013) and receiving exempt status, posts written by Loma Linda University resident physicians in response to forum questions in required online courses were collected from 2002 to 2007. Responses were blinded and manually coded by (...)
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  40. Patricia J. Faulkender, Lillian M. Range, Michelle Hamilton, Marlow Strehlow, Sarah Jackson, Elmer Blanchard & Paul Dean (1994). The Case of the Stolen Psychology Test: An Analysis of an Actual Cheating Incident. Ethics and Behavior 4 (3):209 – 217.
    We examined the attitudes of 600 students in large introductory algebra and psychology classes toward an actual or hypothetical cheating incident and the subsequent retake procedure. Overall, 57% of students in one class and 49Y0 in the other reported that they either cheated or would have cheated if given the opportunity. More men (59%) than women (53%) reported cheating or potential cheating. Students who had actually experienced a retake procedure to handle cheating were more satisfied with such a procedure than (...)
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  41. Celia B. Fisher (2005). Deception Research Involving Children: Ethical Practices and Paradoxes. Ethics and Behavior 15 (3):271 – 287.
    This commentary draws on the thoughtful contemplation and innovative procedures described in the special section articles as well as current professional codes and federal regulations to highlight ethical practices and paradoxes of deception research involving children. The discussion is organized around 4 key decision points for the conduct of responsible deception research involving children: (a) evaluating the scientific validity and social value of deception research within the context of alternative methodologies, (b) avoiding and minimizing experimental risk, (c) the use of (...)
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  42. Harry Frankfurt (2009). On Truth, Lies, and Bullshit. In Clancy W. Martin (ed.), The Philosophy of Deception. Oxford University Press. 37.
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  43. Harry G. Frankfurt (2005). On Bullshit. Princeton University Press.
    One of the most salient features of our culture is that there is so much bullshit. Everyone knows this. Each of us contributes his share. But we tend to take the situation for granted. Most people are rather confident of their ability to recognize bullshit and to avoid being taken in by it. So the phenomenon has not aroused much deliberate concern. We have no clear understanding of what bullshit is, why there is so much of it, or what functions (...)
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  44. Joseph S. Fulda, The Worst Way (Not) to Communicate.
    Evaluates e-mail critically from four perspectives. Note: This is /not/ the full version. The full version is available upon written request only.
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  45. Joseph S. Fulda (1991). The Logic of “Double Talk”: A Case Study in Diplomatic Deception. Journal of Literary Semantics 20 (1):53-55.
    Gives what we call "Asimov's Conjecture" that ambiguity can cause lying without lying, in that read one way a statement is tautologous, while read another way presents an iron-clad promise. Solves the conjecture on Asimov's own case by showing how the statement used (as diplomatic deception) is tautologous in propositional logic and an iron-clad promise in predicate logic (with a tense variable). The motivation for the experiment by Fulda & DeFontes (1989) and "Abstracts from Logical Form I/II (2006).".
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  46. Mollie K. Galloway (2012). Cheating in Advantaged High Schools: Prevalence, Justifications, and Possibilities for Change. Ethics and Behavior 22 (5):378 - 399.
    The current study explored high school student cheating in communities of advantage, gathering survey data from 4,316 high school students in upper middle class communities and qualitative data from a smaller group of students, school leaders, teachers, and parents. Results indicated pervasive cheating among students (93% reported cheating at least once and 26% of upperclassmen indicated cheating in 7 or more of 13 ways listed on the survey). Students described schools as lacking clarity or consequences regarding cheating and expressed feeling (...)
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  47. Benjamin Ginsberg (2007). Autonomy and Duplicity: Reply to DeCanio. Critical Review 19 (1):165-180.
    ABSTRACT While Samuel DeCanio is correct to maintain that the state has considerable autonomy due to the public?s vast ignorance of the government?s affairs, he neglects to consider that the public?s ignorance also stems from the deceptions of the politically powerful, who withhold and distort information in a variety of ways. This can take the form of outright lies; anonymous leaks; press and video releases that don?t mention the originating group or its interests; giving reporters access to otherwise inaccessible information, (...)
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  48. C. D. Herrera (2001). Ethics, Deception, and 'Those Milgram Experiments'. Journal of Applied Philosophy 18 (3):245–256.
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  49. Ralph Hertwig & Andreas Ortmann (2008). Deception in Experiments: Revisiting the Arguments in its Defense. Ethics and Behavior 18 (1):59 – 92.
    In psychology, deception is commonly used to increase experimental control. Yet, its use has provoked concerns that it raises participants' suspicions, prompts second-guessing of experimenters' true intentions, and ultimately distorts behavior and endangers the control it is meant to achieve. Over time, these concerns regarding the methodological costs of the use of deception have been subjected to empirical analysis. We review the evidence stemming from these studies.
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  50. Gail Heyman, Diem Luu & Kang Lee (2009). Parenting by Lying. Journal of Moral Education 38 (3):353-369.
    The present set of studies identifies the phenomenon of ?parenting by lying?, in which parents lie to their children as a means of influencing their emotional states and behaviour. In Study 1, undergraduates (n = 127) reported that their parents had lied to them while maintaining a concurrent emphasis on the importance of honesty. In Study 2 (n = 127), parents reported lying to their children and considered doing so to be acceptable under some circumstances, even though they also reported (...)
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