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  1. Derek Attridge (2004). The Singularity of Literature. Routledge.
    There is no shortage of testimony to literature's puzzling, unsettling, intoxicating, affecting, delighting powers. Nor has there been a shortage of attempts to define literature as a concept, a body of texts or a cultural practice. However, no definition has been able to pin down the peculiarity of literature or to chart our experience of the literary. In this volume, Derek Attridge ask us to confront with him the resistance to definition in order to explore afresh the singularity of literature. (...)
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  2. Martijn Boven (2012). Review of Chris Danta's Literature Suspends Death: Sacrifice and Storytelling in Kierkegaard, Kafka and Blanchot. [REVIEW] Radical Philosophy 174 (july/august):51-53.
    In 'Literature Suspends Death: Sacrifice and Storytelling in Kierkegaard, Kafka and Blanchot' Chris Danta takes Genesis 22 as the starting point for an investigation of the role of literary imagination. His aim is to read the Genesis story from a literary-theoretical perspective in order to show how it can ‘illuminate the secular situation of the literary writer.’ To do this, Danta stages a fruitful confrontation between Søren Kierkegaard as defender of religion and inwardness and Franz Kafka and Maurice Blanchot as (...)
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  3. Walter Brogan (2010). Broken Words: Maurice Blanchot and the Impossibility of Writing. Comparative and Continental Philosophy 1 (2):181-192.
    This essay explains what Blanchot understands as writing and the space of literature. For Blanchot, writing is the place where the impossible interruption of the destiny of things is put into play, an interruption that world-formation needs but negates and conceals. Writing belongs to an excess outside of language, an otherness of language. The need to write is linked to the point at which nothing can be done with words. Writing is contrasted with dialectical language and the totalizing aim of (...)
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  4. Charles Du Bos (1940/1976). What is Literature? Folcroft Library Editions.
    Literature and the soul.--Literature and light.--Literature and beauty.--Literature and the Word.
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  5. Trevor Eaton (1966). The Semantics of Literature. Mouton.
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  6. Jerry Farber (2005). What is Literature? What is Art? Integrating Essence and History. Journal of Aesthetic Education 39 (3):1-21.
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  7. William Craig Forrest (1969). Literature as Aesthetic Object: The Kinesthetic Stratum. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 27 (4):455-459.
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  8. Arthur Gibson (2007). What is Literature? Peter Lang.
    This is the first book-length attempt to find the answer, by one author, since Sartre in his 1948 book with the same title.
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  9. Joseph F. Graham (1992). Onomatopoetics: Theory of Language and Literature. Cambridge University Press.
    The relationship of words to the things they represent and to the mind that forms them has long been the subject of linguistic enquiry. Joseph Graham's challenging book takes this debate into the field of literary theory, making a searching enquiry into the nature of literary representation. It reviews the arguments of Plato's Cratylus on how words signify things, and of Chomsky's theory of the innate "natural" status of language (contrasted with Saussure's notion of its essential arbitrariness). In the process, (...)
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  10. Käte Hamburger (1973). The Logic of Literature. Bloomington,Indiana University Press.
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  11. Mehmet Karabela (2011). Beşir Fuad and His Opponents: The Form of a Debate Over Literature and Truth in Nineteenth-Century Istanbul. Journal of Turkish Literature 8 (1):96-106.
    One and a half months after Victor Hugo died in 1885, Beşir Fuad (d.1887) published a biography of him, in which Fuad defended Emile Zola’s naturalism and realism against Hugo’s romanticism. This resulted in the most important dispute in nineteenth-century Turkish literary history, the hakikiyyûn (realists) and hayâliyyûn (romantics) debate, with the former represented by Beşir Fuad and the latter represented by Menemenlizâde Mehmet Tahir (d.1903). This article focuses on the form of this debate rather than its content, and this (...)
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  12. Peter Lamarque (2007). Aesthetics and Literature: A Problematic Relation? Philosophical Studies 135 (1):27 - 40.
    The paper argues that there is a proper place for literature within aesthetics but that care must be taken in identifying just what the relation is. In characterising aesthetic pleasure associated with literature it is all too easy to fall into reductive accounts, for example, of literature as merely “fine writing”. Belleslettrist or formalistic accounts of literature are rejected, as are two other kinds of reduction, to pure meaning properties and to a kind of narrative realism. The idea is developed (...)
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  13. Christopher Lawn (2001). Gadamer on Poetic and Everyday Language. Philosophy and Literature 25 (1):113-126.
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  14. Colin A. Lyas (1969). The Semantic Definition of Literature. Journal of Philosophy 66 (3):81-95.
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  15. Robert J. Matthews (1981). Literary Works and Institutional Practices. British Journal of Aesthetics 21 (1):39-49.
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  16. Kurt Mueller-Vollmer (1963). Towards a Phenomenological Theory of Literature. The Hague, Mouton.
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  17. Stein Haugom Olsen & Anders Pettersson (eds.) (2005). From Text to Literature: New Analytic and Pragmatic Approaches. Palgrave Macmillan.
    The articles in this collection focus attention on the concept of literature and the concepts of a literary work and a literary text. Adopting an analytic approach, the articles attempt to clarify how these concepts govern our thinking about the phenomenon of literature in various ways, exploring the issues that arise when these concepts are employed as theoretical instruments for describing and analyzing the phenomenon of literature.
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  18. Jean-Paul Sartre (1988). "What is Literature?" and Other Essays. Harvard University Press.
    This new edition of "What is Literature?" also collects three other crucial essays of Sartre's for the first time in a volume of his.
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  19. Jean-Paul Sartre (1967). What is Literature? Methuen.
    Jean-Paul Sartre was one of the most important philosophical and political thinkers of the twentieth century. His writings had a potency that was irresistible to the intellectual scene that swept post-war Europe, and have left a vital inheritance to contemporary thought. The central tenet of the Existentialist movement which he helped to found, whereby God is replaced by an ethical self, proved hugely attractive to a generation that had seen the horrors of Nazism, and provoked a revolution in post-war thought (...)
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  20. Norman Sjoman (1981). Jagannātha's Definition of Poetry: An Analysis of the Introductory Verses of Rasagangādhara and the Definition of Poetry. [REVIEW] Journal of Indian Philosophy 9 (4):359-402.
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