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  1. Philip Alperson (1992). The Arts of Music. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 50 (3):217-230.
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  2. Philip Alperson (ed.) (1987). What is Music?: An Introduction to the Philosophy of Music. Pennsylvania State University Press.
    Contributors to this volume are Philip Alperson, Francis Sparshott, Nicholas Wolterstorff, Edward T. Cone, Peter Kivy, Jenefer Robinson, Joseph Margolis, Arnold ...
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  3. Meter Amevans (1967). What is Music? Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 26 (2):241-249.
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  4. Subhasis Chattopadhyay (2016). Review of The Soul of the World. [REVIEW] Prabuddha Bharata or Awakened India 121 (September):672-3.
    Roger Scruton is dismissed by those who do not care to study him as a conservative philosopher. This review shows how Scruton is in fact more a theologian than a philosopher. This review is contrarian in tone to the reviews of Scruton to be found online and restores him as the rightful heir to theologians like Barth, Bultmann etc.
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  5. Adrian Currie & Anton Killin (2016). Musical Pluralism and the Science of Music. European Journal for Philosophy of Science 6 (1):9-30.
    The scientific investigation of music requires contributions from a diverse array of disciplines. Given the diverse methodologies, interests and research targets of the disciplines involved, we argue that there is a plurality of legitimate research questions about music, necessitating a focus on integration. In light of this we recommend a pluralistic conception of music—that there is no unitary definition divorced from some discipline, research question or context. This has important implications for how the scientific study of music ought to proceed: (...)
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  6. Theodore Gracyk & Andrew Kania (eds.) (2011). The Routledge Companion to Philosophy and Music. Routledge.
    _The Routledge Companion to Philosophy and Music_ is an outstanding guide and reference source to the key topics, subjects, thinkers and debates in philosophy and music. Over fifty entries by an international team of contributors are organised into six clear sections: general issues emotion history figures kinds of music music, philosophy and related disciplines _The Routledge Companion to Philosophy and Music_ is essential reading for anyone interested in philosophy, music and musicology.
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  7. Andrew Kania (2010). Silent Music. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 68 (4):343-353.
    In this essay, I investigate musical silence. I first discuss how to integrate the concept of silence into a general theory or definition of music. I then consider the possibility of an entirely silent musical piece. I begin with John Cage’s 4′33″, since it is the most notorious candidate for a silent piece of music, even though it is not, in fact, silent. I conclude that it is not music either, but I argue that it is a piece of non-musical (...)
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  8. Andrew Kania (2008). The Philosophy of Music. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    This is an overview of analytic philosophy of music. It is in five sections, as follows: 1. What Is Music? 2. Musical Ontology 3. Music and the Emotions 4. Understanding Music 5. Music and Value.
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  9. Achille C. Varzi (2013). Cover to Cover. Current Musicology 95:177–191.
    Paul Goguen once said that art is either plagiarism or revolution. That is certainly true of music. From pop to jazz to classical music, there’s a long history of borrowing, lifting, and stealing from other composers, along with other ways of building on their artistic contributions. Here I try to put some order in the complex picture that emerges from such a history, with an eye to the criteria—if any—that underlie the complex ways in which we compare, identify, and categorize (...)
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