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  1. Kristoffer Ahlstrom-Vij (2012). Why Deliberative Democracy is (Still) Untenable. Public Affairs Quarterly 26 (3):199-220.
    A common objection to deliberative democracy is that available evidence on public ignorance makes it unlikely that social deliberation among the public is a process likely to yield accurate outputs. The present paper considers—and ultimately rejects—two responses to this objection. The first response is that the correct conclusion to draw from the evidence is simply that we must work harder to ensure that the deliberative process improves the deliberators’ epistemic situation. The main problem for this response is that there are (...)
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  2. Scott F. Aikin (2006). Commentary on Democratic “Deliberation, Public Reason, and Environmental Politics”. Environmental Philosophy 3 (2):59-63.
    Editors’ Note: We decided that a commentary to the original Aikin essay from the perspective of humanities policy would be beneficial. We then invited Scott Aikin to respond to this commentary. What follows is (a) the Briggle/Frodeman commentary and (b) the Aikin response. We present the discussion in its entirety in the conviction that this transparency will help the reader to critically assess the viability of these arguments and to draw his/her own conclusion as to the efficacy of such reasoning (...)
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  3. David Archard (2001). Political Disagreement, Legitimacy, and Civility. Philosophical Explorations 4 (3):207 – 222.
    For many contemporary liberal political philosophers the appropriate response to the facts of pluralism is the requirement of public reasonableness, namely that individuals should be able to offer to their fellow citizens reasons for their political actions that can generally be accepted.This article finds wanting two possible arguments for such a requirement: one from a liberal principle of legitimacy and the other from a natural duty of political civility. A respect in which conversational restraint in the face of political agreement (...)
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  4. Carlo Argenton & Enzo Rossi (2013). Pluralism, Preferences, and Deliberation: A Critique of Sen's Constructive Argument for Democracy. Journal of Social Philosophy 44 (2):129-145.
    In this paper we argue that Sen's defence of liberal democracy suffers from a moralistic and pro-liberal bias that renders it unable to take pluralism as seriously as it professes to do. That is because Sen’s commitment to respecting pluralism is not matched by his account of how to individuate the sorts of preferences that ought to be included in democratic deliberation. Our argument generalises as a critique of the two most common responses to the fact of pluralism in contemporary (...)
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  5. Katie Atkinson, Trevor Bench-Capon & Peter McBurney (2006). PARMENIDES: Facilitating Deliberation in Democracies. [REVIEW] Artificial Intelligence and Law 14 (4):261-275.
    Governments and other groups interested in the views of citizens require the means to present justifications of proposed actions, and the means to solicit public opinion concerning these justifications. Although Internet technologies provide the means for such dialogues, system designers usually face a choice between allowing unstructured dialogues, through, for example, bulletin boards, or requiring citizens to acquire a knowledge of some argumentation schema or theory, as in, for example, ZENO. Both of these options present usability problems. In this paper, (...)
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  6. Robert Audi (1989). The Separation of Church and State and the Obligations of Citizenship. Philosophy and Public Affairs 18 (3):259-296.
  7. Randall E. Auxier (1992). Hanks on Habermas and Democratic Communication. Southwest Philosophy Review 8 (2):97-100.
  8. André Bächtiger, Simon Niemeyer, Michael Neblo, Marco R. Steenbergen & Jürg Steiner (2010). Disentangling Diversity in Deliberative Democracy: Competing Theories, Their Blind Spots and Complementarities. Journal of Political Philosophy 18 (1):32-63.
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  9. André Bächtiger, Simon Niemeyer, Michael Neblo, Marco R. Steenbergen & Jürg Steiner (2010). Disentangling Diversity in Deliberative Democracy: Competing Theories, Their Blind Spots and Complementarities. Journal of Political Philosophy 18 (1):32-63.
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  10. M. Bacon (2010). The Politics of Truth: A Critique of Peircean Deliberative Democracy. Philosophy and Social Criticism 36 (9):1075-1091.
    Recent discussion in democratic theory has seen a revival of interest in pragmatism. Drawing on the work of C. S. Peirce, Cheryl Misak and Robert Talisse have argued that a form of deliberative democracy is justified as the means for citizens to assure themselves of the truth of their beliefs. In this article, I suggest that the Peircean account of deliberative democracy is conceived too narrowly. It takes its force from seeing citizens as intellectual inquirers, something that I argue is (...)
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  11. Ryan K. Balot (2009). The Virtue Politics of Democratic Athens. In Stephen G. Salkever (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Ancient Greek Political Thought. Cambridge University Press.
  12. Christian Barry (2008). Christopher F. Zurn,Deliberative Democracy and the Institutions of Judicial Review:Deliberative Democracy and the Institutions of Judicial Review. Ethics 118 (4):767-772.
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  13. John Barry (2009). Ecological Politics and Democratic Theory: The Challenge to the Deliberative Ideal. Contemporary Political Theory 8 (1):115.
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  14. C. Beltran (2011). Book Review: Civil Passions: Moral Sentiment and Democratic Deliberation. [REVIEW] Political Theory 39 (5):682-685.
  15. Seyla Benhabib (2004). On Culture, Public Reason, and Deliberation: Response to Pensky and Peritz. Constellations 11 (2):291-299.
  16. Thomas M. Besch (2014). On Discursive Respect. Social Theory and Practice 40 (2):207-231.
    Moral and political forms of constructivism accord to people strong, “constitutive” forms of discursive standing and so build on, or express, a commitment to discursive respect. The paper explores dimensions of discursive respect, i.e., depth, scope, and purchase; it addresses tenuous interdependencies between them; on this basis, it identifies limitations of the idea of discursive respect and of constructivism. The task of locating discursive respect in the normative space defined by its three dimensions is partly, and importantly, an ethical task (...)
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  17. Thomas Biebricher (2007). Habermas and Foucault: Deliberative Democracy and Strategic State Analysis. Contemporary Political Theory 6 (2):218.
  18. Martin Blanchard (2012). Violence et démocratie délibérative : introduction. Les Ateliers de l'Éthique / the Ethics Forum 7 (1):45-49.
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  19. Charles Blattberg (2003). Patriotic, Not Deliberative, Democracy. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 6 (1):155-174.
    Given the concern they share for the common good, both patriotic and deliberative conceptions of democracy can be said to have roots in classical republicanism. But these two modern approaches to politics are not the same. In order to show this, as well as demonstrate patriotism's superiority to deliberative democracy, I offer four criticisms of the latter: (i) its support of a theory or systematic set of procedures for conversation distorts its practice; (ii) it is ideologically biased; (iii) its distinction (...)
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  20. Ricardo Blaug (2000). Citizenship and Political Judgment: Between Discourse Ethics and Phronesis. Res Publica 6 (2):179-198.
    Political judgment is notoriously hard to theorise, and in the recent debates surrounding Habermas's discourse ethics we encounter classic disagreements around the nature, operation and validity of such judgments. This paper evaluates Habermas's account of political judgment and explores the problems raised by his critics. It then focuses on the contentious role played by universals within his account. What emerges is a reformulated theory of judgment based on the thin universalism of fair deliberation, and a description of a sub-set of (...)
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  21. J. Bohman (1998). Survey Article: The Coming of Age of Deliberative Democracy. Journal of Political Philosophy 6 (4):400–425.
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  22. James Bohman (2006). Deliberative Democracy and the Epistemic Benefits of Diversity. Episteme 3 (3):175-191.
    It is often assumed that democracies can make good use of the epistemic benefi ts of diversity among their citizenry, but difficult to show why this is the case. In a deliberative democracy, epistemically relevant diversity has three aspects: the diversity of opinions, values, and perspectives. Deliberative democrats generally argue for an epistemic form of Rawls' difference principle: that good deliberative practice ought to maximize deliberative inputs, whatever they are, so as to benefi t all deliberators, including the least eff (...)
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  23. James Bohman (2004). Realizing Deliberative Democracy as a Mode of Inquiry: Pragmatism, Social Facts, and Normative Theory. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 18 (1):23-43.
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  24. James Bohman & Henry S. Richardson (2009). Liberalism, Deliberative Democracy, and "Reasons That All Can Accept". Journal of Political Philosophy 17 (3):253-274.
  25. Richard Boyd (2004). Pity's Pathologies Portrayed: Rousseau and the Limits of Democratic Compassion. Political Theory 32 (4):519-546.
    Jean-Jacques Rousseau is renowned for defending the pity of the state of nature over and against the vanity, cruelty, and inequalities of civil society. In the standard reading, it is this sentiment of pity, activated by our imagination, that allows for the cultivation of compassion. However, a closer look at the "pathologies of pity" in Rousseau's system challenges this idea that pity is a pleasurable sentiment that arises from a recognition of the identity of our natures and leads ultimately to (...)
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  26. Gregory Brazeal (2011). Webs of Faith as a Source of Reasonable Disagreement. Critical Review 23 (4):421-448.
    Abstract An individual's beliefs can be seen as rationally related to one another in a kind of web. These beliefs, however, may not form a single, seamless web. There may exist smaller, largely self-contained webs with few or no rational relations to the larger web. Such ?webs of faith? make it possible for reasonable deliberators to persist in a disagreement even under ideal deliberative conditions. The possibility of reasonable disagreement challenges the assumption that rationality should lead to consensus and presents (...)
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  27. Stephen Brookfield (2010). Learning Democratic Reason : The Adult Education Project of Jürgen Habermas. In Mark Murphy & Ted Fleming (eds.), Habermas, Critical Theory and Education. Routledge.
  28. Thom Brooks (2009). A Critique of Pragmatism and Deliberative Democracy. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 45 (1):pp. 50-54.
    This paper offers two potential worries in Robert B. Talisse's A Pragmatist Philosophy of Democracy. The first worry is that is that the picture of democracy on offer is incomplete. While Talisse correctly argues that democracy is about more than elections, democracy is also about more than deliberation between citizens. Talisse's deliberative democracy is problematic to the degree its view of deliberation fails to account for democracy. The second worry we may have concerns the relationship between Talisse's Peircean pragmatism and (...)
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  29. Thom Brooks (2006). Ian Shapiro, The State of Democratic Theory:The State of Democratic Theory. Ethics 116 (2):442-444.
    Book review of Ian Shapiro - "The State of Democratic Theory".
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  30. Miriam Brouillet & Leigh Turner (2005). Bioethics, Religion, and Democratic Deliberation: Policy Formation and Embryonic Stem Cell Research. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 17 (1):49-63.
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  31. Hubertus Buchstein (1997). Bytes That Bite: The Internet and Deliberative Democracy. Constellations 4 (2):248-263.
  32. F. C. (2002). Deliberative Democracy and Constitutional Review. Law and Philosophy 21 (s 4-5):467-542.
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  33. Zsuzsanna Chappell (2008). Rational Choice and Democratic Deliberation: A Theory of Discourse Failure, by Guido Pincione and Fernando R. Tesón, 2006, XI + 258 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 24 (1):105-111.
  34. Tarnopolsky Christina (2007). Platonic Reflections on the Aesthetic Dimensions of Deliberative Democracy. Political Theory 35 (3).
  35. R. J. G. Claassen (2009). New Directions for the Capability Approach: Deliberative Democracy and Republicanism. Res Publica 15 (4):421-428.
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  36. Joshua Cohen (2003). Delibration and Democratic Legitimacy. In Derek Matravers & Jonathan E. Pike (eds.), Debates in Contemporary Political Philosophy: An Anthology. Routledge, in Association with the Open University.
  37. Joshua Cohen (1989). Democratic Equality. Ethics 99 (4):727-751.
  38. Joshua Cohen (1989). The Economic Basis of Deliberative Democracy. Social Philosophy and Policy 6 (02):25-.
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  39. Rory J. Conces (2005). Sizifovska Priča: Patologija Etničkog Nacionalizma I Pedagogija Kovanja Humanih Demokratija Na Balkanu (A Sisyphean Tale: The Pathology of Ethnic Nationalism and the Pedagogy of Forging Humane Democracies in the Balkans). Dijalog 1:74-99.
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  40. Norman Daniels & James Sabin (1997). Limits to Health Care: Fair Procedures, Democratic Deliberation, and the Legitimacy Problem for Insurers. Philosophy and Public Affairs 26 (4):303–350.
  41. Susan Dodds & Rachel A. Ankeny (2006). Regulation of hESC Research in Australia: Promises and Pitfalls for Deliberative Democratic Approaches. [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 3 (1-2):95-107.
    This paper considers the legislative debates in Australia that led to the passage of the Research Involving Human Embryos Act (Cth 2002) and the Prohibition of Human Cloning Act (Cth 2002). In the first part of the paper, we discuss the debate surrounding the legislation with particular emphasis on the ways in which demands for public consultation, public debate and the education of Australians about the potential ethical and scientific impact of human embryonic stem cells (hESC) research were deployed, and (...)
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  42. Anna Drake & Allison McCulloch (2011). Deliberative Consociationalism in Deeply Divided Societies. Contemporary Political Theory 10 (3):372-392.
  43. J. S. Dryzek (2013). The Deliberative Democrat's Idea of Justice. European Journal of Political Theory 12 (4):329-346.
    In Amartya Sen’s The Idea of Justice, democracy is necessary for the reconciliation of plural justice claims. Sen’s treatment of democracy is however incomplete and inadequate: democracy is under-specified, there are unrecognized difficulties in any context featuring deep moral disagreement or deep division and a conceptualization of public reason in the singular erodes his pluralism. These faults undermine Sen’s account of justice. Developments in the theory of deliberative democracy can be deployed to remedy these deficiencies. This deployment points to a (...)
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  44. John S. Dryzek (2010). Foundations and Frontiers of Deliberative Governance. OUP Oxford.
    Deliberative democracy now dominates the theory, reform, and study of democracy. Working at its cutting edges, Foundations and Frontiers of Deliberative Governance reaches from conceptual underpinnings to the key challenges faced in applications to ever-increasing ranges of problems and issues. Following a survey of the life and times of deliberative democracy, the turns it has taken, and the logic of deliberative systems, contentious foundational issues receive attention. How can deliberative legitimacy be achieved in large-scale societies where face-to-face deliberation is implausible? (...)
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  45. John S. Dryzek (2001). Legitimacy and Economy in Deliberative Democracy. Political Theory 29 (5):651-669.
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  46. John S. Dryzek & Christian List (2004). Social Choice Theory and Deliberative Democracy : A Response to Aldred. British Journal of Political Science 34 (4):752-758.
    Jonathan Aldred shares our desire to promote a reconciliation between social choice theory and deliberative democracy in the interests of a more comprehensive and compelling account of democracy.1 His comments on some details of our analysis – specifically, our use of Arrow’s conditions of universal domain and independence of irrelevant alternatives – give us an opportunity to clarify our position. His discussion of the independence condition in particular identifies some ambiguity in our exposition, and as such is useful. We are (...)
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  47. Ben Eggleston (2004). Procedural Justice in Young's Inclusive Deliberative Democracy. Journal of Social Philosophy 35 (4):544-549.
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  48. Ben Eggleston (2004). Procedural Justice in Young's Inclusive Deliberative Democracy. Journal of Social Philosophy 35 (4):544-549.
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  49. Kristian Skagen Ekeli (2005). Giving a Voice to Posterity – Deliberative Democracy and Representation of Future People. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 18 (5):429-450.
    The aim of this paper is to consider whether some seats in a democratically elected legislative assembly ought to be reserved for representatives of future generations. In order to examine this question, I will propose a new democratic model for representing posterity. It is argued that this model has several advantages compared with a model for the democratic representation of future people previously suggested by Andrew Dobson. Nevertheless, the democratic model that I propose confronts at least two difficult problems. First, (...)
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  50. Stephen L. Elkin (2004). Thinking Constitutionally: The Problem of Deliberative Democracy. Social Philosophy and Policy 21 (1):39-75.
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