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Subcategories:History/traditions: Deontological Moral Theories
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  1. Elisa Aaltola (2007). The Moral Value of Animals. The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 3:219-225.
    Altruism has often been thought to be the reason we treat animals with a certain moral respect. Animals are not moral agents who could reciprocally honour our well being, and because of this duties toward them are considered to be based on other-directed motivations. Altruism is a vague notion, and in the context of animals can be divided into at least three different alternatives. The first one equates altruism with benevolence or "kindness"; the second one argues altruism is based on (...)
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  2. Larry Alexander (2008). Scalar Properties, Binary Judgments. Journal of Applied Philosophy 25 (2):85–104.
    In the moral realm, our deontic judgments are usually (always?) binary. An act (or omission) is either morally forbidden or morally permissible. 1 Yet the determination of an act's deontic status frequently turns on the existence of properties that are matters of degree. In what follows I shall give several examples of binary moral judgments that turn on scalar properties, and I shall claim that these examples should puzzle us. How can the existence of a property to a specific degree (...)
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  3. Larry Alexander & Kimberly Kessler Ferzan (2012). Ferzander's Surrebuttal. Criminal Law and Philosophy 6 (3):463-465.
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  4. Robin Attfield (2012). Synthetic Biology, Deontology and Synthetic Bioethics. Ethics, Policy and Environment 15 (1):29 - 32.
    Paul Thompson argues that current synthetic biology amounts to synthetic genomics, comprising a ?platform? technology, and that Christopher Preston's deontological objections based on its supposed rejection of the historical process of evolution miscarry. This makes it surprising that Thompson's normative ethic consists in a deontological appeal to Kantian duties of imperfect obligation. Construed as obligations subject to choice, such constraints risk being excessively malleable where the ethical objections to deployment of this technology concern land rights and/or exploitation. Thompson's advocacy of (...)
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  5. Samuel Freeman (1994). Utilitarianism, Deontology, and the Priority of Right. Philosophy and Public Affairs 23 (4):313–349.
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  6. Phillip Goggans (2000). A Minimalist Ethic of Duty. Journal of Philosophical Research 25:431-436.
    It is proposed that an act is morally wrong just in case it is a violation of a duty not to perform that particular act. This is equivalent to the claim that acts have their moral status essentially. This theory preserves some main deontological intuitions without making problematic claims about kinds of acts.
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  7. Nien-Hê Hsieh, Alan Strudler & David Wasserman (2006). The Numbers Problem. Philosophy and Public Affairs 34 (4):352 - 372.
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  8. Guy Kahane (2012). On the Wrong Track: Process and Content in Moral Psychology. Mind and Language 27 (5):519-545.
    According to Joshua Greene’s influential dual process model of moral judgment, different modes of processing are associated with distinct moral outputs: automatic processing with deontological judgment, and controlled processing with utilitarian judgment. This paper aims to clarify and assess Greene’s model. I argue that the proposed tie between process and content is based on a misinterpretation of the evidence, and that the supposed evidence for controlled processing in utilitarian judgment is actually likely to reflect generic deliberation which, ironically, is incompatible (...)
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  9. F. M. Kamm (2000). Collaboration and Responsibility. Philosophy and Public Affairs 28 (3):169-204.
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  10. F. M. Kamm (1992). Review: Non-Consequentialism, the Person as an End-in-Itself, and the Significance of Status. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Public Affairs 21 (4):354 - 389.
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  11. Will Kymlicka (1988). Rawls on Teleology and Deontology. Philosophy and Public Affairs 17 (3):173-190.
  12. Thaddeus Metz (forthcoming). Relational Ethics: An African Moral Theory. Oxford University Press.
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  13. Sven Nyholm (2014). Ingmar Persson, From Morality to the End of Reason (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013), Pp. 336. [REVIEW] Utilitas 26 (3):321-325.
    Persson argues that common sense morality involves various “asymmetries” that don’t stand up to rational scrutiny. (One example is that intentionally harming others is commonly thought to be worse than merely allowing harm to happen, even if the harm involved is equal in both cases.) A wholly rational morality would, Persson argues, be wholly symmetrical. He also argues, however, that when we get down to our most basic attitudes and dispositions, we reach the “end of reason,” at which point we (...)
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  14. Michael Philips (1987). Moralism and the Good. Philosophical Studies 52 (1):131 - 139.
    It is often held that moral considerations take precedence over considerations of other kinds in determining what we ought to do. I contend that this claim is ambiguous and argue that objections to each interpretation of it can be met only by rejecting the other. One surprising consequence of my argument is that no deontic moral theory can effectively guide action unless it is conjoined with a theory of the good. Another interesting consequence is that the deontologists' favorite objection to (...)
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  15. Luke Robinson (2012). Exploring Alternatives to the Simple Model: Is There an Atomistic Option? In Mark Timmons (ed.), Oxford Studies in Normative Ethics, Vol. 2. Oxford University Press.
    The simple model maintains that morally relevant factors combine in a simple, additive way, like weights on a scale. Although intuitive and familiar, this model entails that certain plausible views about particular cases and how morally relevant factors combine and interact therein are false. Shelly Kagan suggests that we could accommodate the relevant views and interactions by rejecting either of two assumptions the simple model makes: that the moral status of an act is determined by the sum of the contributions (...)
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  16. Krzysztof Saja (2015). Etyka normatywna. Między konsekwencjalizmem a deontologią. Universitas.
    The primary goal of this monograph is to justify the possibility of building a hybrid theory of normative ethics which can combine ethical consequentialism, deontology and virtue ethics. The aim of the book is to demonstrate the possibility of constructing a synthetic theory from ethical traditions that are generally considered to be contradictory. In addition, I propose an outline of an original theory which tries to carry out such a synthesis. I call it Institutional Function Consequentialism. The justification for a (...)
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  17. Michael Smith (2011). Deontological Moral Obligations and Non-Welfarist Agent-Relative Values. Ratio 24 (4):351-363.
    Many claim that a plausible moral theory would have to include a principle of beneficence, a principle telling us to produce goods that are both welfarist and agent-neutral. But when we think carefully about the necessary connection between moral obligations and reasons for action, we see that agents have two reasons for action, and two moral obligations: they must not interfere with any agent's exercise of his rational capacities and they must do what they can to make sure that agents (...)
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  18. Franz Ungler (1979). Zu Fichtes Theorie des Gewissens. Wiener Jahrbuch für Philosophie 12:212-235.
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  19. Matt Zwolinski (2009). Review of Autonomy and Rights: The Moral Foundations of Liberalism. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 43 (2):255-262.
    This is a review of Horacio Spector's book on the occassion of its publiaction in paperback form in 2007. The version of the review posted here includes a number of footnotes and references that had to be deleted in the final published version.
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  1. Henry E. Allison (2013). The Singleness of the Categorical Imperative. In Margit Ruffing, Claudio La Rocca, Alfredo Ferrarin & Stefano Bacin (eds.), Kant Und Die Philosophie in Weltbürgerlicher Absicht: Akten des Xi. Kant-Kongresses 2010. De Gruyter. 37-54.
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  2. Brenda Almond (2012). Kantian Voices in the Family Values Debate. Ethics and Social Welfare 6 (2):143-156.
    One of the explanations frequently offered for current social problems is the breakdown of the family as an institution and the decline of values such as trust and responsibility that were until recently associated with it. While the philosophical position of many commentators in this area is rooted in a broadly utilitarian social philosophy, there is a case for an alternative?i.e. non-utilitarian?philosophical point of view. The essential requirement for such an alternative approach is that it accords a place to certain (...)
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  3. Judith Andre (2013). Open Hope as a Civic Virtue. Social Philosophy Today 29:89-100.
    Hope as a virtue is an acquired disposition, shaped by reflection; as a civic virtue it must serve the good of the community. Ernst Bloch and Lord Buddha offer help in constructing such a virtue. Using a taxonomy developed by Darren Webb I distinguish open hope from goal-oriented hope, and use each thinker to develop the former. Bloch and Buddha are very different (and notoriously obscure; I do not attempt an exegesis). But they share a metaphysics of change, foundational for (...)
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  4. John J. Ansbro (1973). Kant's Limitations on Individual Freedom. New Scholasticism 47 (1):88-99.
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  5. M. T. Antonelli (1948). H. Y. PATON, "The Categorical Imperative - A study in Kant's Moral, Philosophy". [REVIEW] Epistemologia 3 (5):535.
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  6. Richard E. Aquila (1984). Duty and Inclination: The Fundamentals of Morality Discussed and Redefined with Special Regard to Kant and Schiller. [REVIEW] Husserl Studies 1 (1):307-330.
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  7. Roy Ascott (2006). The Syncretic Imperative. Technoetic Arts: A Journal of Speculative Research 4 (2):109-113.
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  8. Sorin Baiasu (2013). The Deontic Force of the Formula of Universal Law. In Margit Ruffing, Claudio La Rocca, Alfredo Ferrarin & Stefano Bacin (eds.), Kant Und Die Philosophie in Weltbürgerlicher Absicht: Akten des Xi. Kant-Kongresses 2010. De Gruyter. 41-50.
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  9. Tom Bailey (2003). Nietzsche's Kantian Ethics. International Studies in Philosophy 35 (3):5-27.
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  10. H. Barker (1948). PATON, H. J. - The Categorical Imperative: A Study in Kant's Moral Philosophy. [REVIEW] Mind 57:93.
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  11. Gerald W. Barnes (1971). In Defense of Kant's Doctrine of the Highest Good. Philosophical Forum 2 (4):446.
    MANY COMMENTATORS HAVE SAID THAT KANT'S DOCTRINE OF THE HIGHEST GOOD - AS EXPRESSED IN THE SECOND CRITIQUE, FOR EXAMPLE - IS SERIOUSLY FLAWED BOTH IN ITSELF AND IN THAT IT CONTRADICTS OTHER IMPORTANT CLAIMS OF KANT'S MORAL PHILOSOPHY. I ADVANCE AN INTERPRETATION OF KANT'S DOCTRINE ON WHICH IT SUFFERS FROM NONE OF THESE ALLEGED FLAWS.
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  12. Marcia Baron (1997). Three Methods of Ethics: A Debate. Blackwell.
    Written in the form of a debate, this volume presents a clear survey and assessment of the main arguments, both for and against each of these three central ...
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  13. Robert M. Barry (1964). "Kant's Theory of Knowledge: An Outline of One Central Argument in the 'Critique of Pure Reason,'" by Graham Bird. Modern Schoolman 41 (3):282-285.
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  14. Avner Baz (2008). Being Right, and Being in the Right. Inquiry 51 (6):627 – 644.
    This paper presents a critique of a prevailing conception of the relation between moral reasoning and judgment on the one hand, and moral goodness on the other. I argue that moral reasoning is inescapably vulnerable to moral, as opposed to merely theoretical, failure. This, I argue, means that there is something deeply misleading in the way that Kant's moral theory, and some of its main rivals, have invited us to conceive of their subject matter.
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  15. Roi Benbassat (2012). Kierkegaard's Relation to Kantian Ethics Reconsidered. Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook 2012 (1).
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  16. Monika Betzler (ed.) (2008). Kant's Ethics of Virtues. Walter De Gruyter.
  17. Rüdiger Bittner (1980). Hypothetische Imperative. Zeitschrift für Philosophische Forschung 34 (2):210 - 226.
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  18. Omri Boehm (2012). Kant and Spinozism: Trancendental Idealism and Immanence From Jacobi to Deleuze. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 20 (5):1041-1045.
    British Journal for the History of Philosophy, Volume 0, Issue 0, Page 1-4, Ahead of Print.
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  19. E. J. Bond (1968). The Supreme Principle of Morality. Dialogue 7 (02):167-179.
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  20. Maria Borges (2008). Actions and Feelings: Série 2. Kant E-Prints 3:115-122.
    In this paper, I analyze Kant’s theory of action and if human beings can act morally without being moved by sensible feelings. I will show that the answer of the Critique of Pure Reason, Groundwork and the Critical of Practical Reason is without any doubt “yes”, but Kant is ambiguous in the Metaphysics of Morals and also in the Anthropology. In the Metaphysics of Morals, Kant claims that there are some sensible conditions to the reception of the concept of duty: (...)
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  21. Matthew Braham & Martin van Hees (2015). The Formula of Universal Law: A Reconstruction. Erkenntnis 80 (2):243-260.
    This paper provides a methodologically original construction of Kant’s “Formula of Universal Law” . A formal structure consisting of possible worlds and games—a “game frame”—is used to implement Kant’s concept of a maxim and to define the two tests FUL comprises: the “contradiction in conception” and “contradiction in the will” tests. The paper makes two contributions. Firstly, the model provides a formal account of the variables that are built into FUL: agents, maxims, intentions, actions, and outcomes. This establishes a clear (...)
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  22. Marilea Bramer (2010). The Importance of Personal Relationships in Kantian Moral Theory: A Reply to Care Ethics. Hypatia 25 (1):121-139.
    Care ethicists have long insisted that Kantian moral theory fails to capture the partiality that ought to be present in our personal relationships. In her most recent book, Virginia Held claims that, unlike impartial moral theories, care ethics guides us in how we should act toward friends and family. Because these actions are performed out of care, they have moral value for a care ethicist. The same actions, Held claims, would not have moral worth for a Kantian because of the (...)
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  23. Johan Brännmark (2002). Morality and the Pursuit of Happiness: A Study in Kantian Ethics. Dissertation, Lund University
    This work seeks to develop a Kantian ethical theory in terms of a general ontology of values and norms together with a metaphysics of the person that makes sense of this ontology. It takes as its starting point Kant’s assertion that a good will is the only thing that has an unconditioned value and his accompanying view that the highest good consists in virtue and happiness in proportion to virtue. The soundness of Kant’s position on the value of the good (...)
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  24. Samantha Brennan (2001). Arthur Ripstein, Equality, Responsibility, and the Law Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 21 (4):288-290.
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  25. Samantha Brennan (2001). Arthur Ripstein, Equality, Responsibility, and the Law. [REVIEW] Philosophy in Review 21:288-290.
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  26. Talbot Brewer (2001). Rethinking Our Maxims: Perceptual Salience and Practical Judgment in Kantian Ethics. [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 4 (3):219-230.
    Some contemporary Kantians have argued that one could not be virtuous without having internalized certain patterns of awareness that permit one to identify and respond reliably to moral reasons for action. I agree, but I argue that this insight requires unrecognized, farreaching, and thoroughly welcome changes in the traditional Kantian understanding of maxims and virtues. In particular, it implies that one''s characteristic emotions and desires will partly determine one''s maxims, and hence the praiseworthiness of one''s actions. I try to show (...)
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  27. B. Bright (1989). The Epistemological Imperative. In Barry P. Bright (ed.), Theory and Practice in the Study of Adult Education: The Epistemological Debate. Routledge.
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  28. Thom Brooks (2003). Kant's Theory of Punishment. Utilitas 15 (02):206-.
    The most widespread interpretation amongst contemporary theorists of Kant's theory of punishment is that it is retributivist. On the contrary, I will argue there are very different senses in which Kant discusses punishment. He endorses retribution for moral law transgressions and consequentialist considerations for positive law violations. When these standpoints are taken into consideration, Kant's theory of punishment is more coherent and unified than previously thought. This reading uncovers a new problem in Kant's theory of punishment. By assuming a potential (...)
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  29. Samuel V. Bruton (2003). Philip Stratton-Lake, Kant, Duty and Moral Worth, London, Routledge, 2000, Pp. Xi + 153. Utilitas 15 (2):248-249.
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  30. Samuel V. Bruton (2003). Marcia W. Baron, Kantian Ethics Almost Without Apology, Ithaca, N.Y., Cornell University Press, 1995, Pp. Xiii + 244. Utilitas 15 (01):121-.
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  31. P. Burcher (2012). The Noncompliant Patient: A Kantian and Levinasian Response. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 37 (1):74-89.
    When a patient fails to follow the advice or prescription of a physician, she is termed to be "noncompliant" by the medical community. The medical community’s response to and understanding of patient noncompliance fails to acknowledge noncompliance as either a relational failure between physician and patient or as a patient choice. I offer an analysis of Immanuel Kant and Emmanuel Levinas that refocuses the issue of noncompliance by examining the physician role, the doctor–patient relationship, and the nature of responsibility.
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