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Subcategories:History/traditions: Deontological Moral Theories
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  1. Elisa Aaltola (2007). The Moral Value of Animals. The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 3:219-225.
    Altruism has often been thought to be the reason we treat animals with a certain moral respect. Animals are not moral agents who could reciprocally honour our well being, and because of this duties toward them are considered to be based on other-directed motivations. Altruism is a vague notion, and in the context of animals can be divided into at least three different alternatives. The first one equates altruism with benevolence or "kindness"; the second one argues altruism is based on (...)
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  2. Larry Alexander (2008). Scalar Properties, Binary Judgments. Journal of Applied Philosophy 25 (2):85–104.
    In the moral realm, our deontic judgments are usually (always?) binary. An act (or omission) is either morally forbidden or morally permissible. 1 Yet the determination of an act's deontic status frequently turns on the existence of properties that are matters of degree. In what follows I shall give several examples of binary moral judgments that turn on scalar properties, and I shall claim that these examples should puzzle us. How can the existence of a property to a specific degree (...)
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  3. Larry Alexander & Kimberly Kessler Ferzan (2012). Ferzander's Surrebuttal. Criminal Law and Philosophy 6 (3):463-465.
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  4. Robin Attfield (2012). Synthetic Biology, Deontology and Synthetic Bioethics. Ethics, Policy and Environment 15 (1):29 - 32.
    Paul Thompson argues that current synthetic biology amounts to synthetic genomics, comprising a ?platform? technology, and that Christopher Preston's deontological objections based on its supposed rejection of the historical process of evolution miscarry. This makes it surprising that Thompson's normative ethic consists in a deontological appeal to Kantian duties of imperfect obligation. Construed as obligations subject to choice, such constraints risk being excessively malleable where the ethical objections to deployment of this technology concern land rights and/or exploitation. Thompson's advocacy of (...)
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  5. Samuel Freeman (1994). Utilitarianism, Deontology, and the Priority of Right. Philosophy and Public Affairs 23 (4):313–349.
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  6. Phillip Goggans (2000). A Minimalist Ethic of Duty. Journal of Philosophical Research 25:431-436.
    It is proposed that an act is morally wrong just in case it is a violation of a duty not to perform that particular act. This is equivalent to the claim that acts have their moral status essentially. This theory preserves some main deontological intuitions without making problematic claims about kinds of acts.
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  7. Nien-Hê Hsieh, Alan Strudler & David Wasserman (2006). The Numbers Problem. Philosophy and Public Affairs 34 (4):352 - 372.
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  8. Guy Kahane (2012). On the Wrong Track: Process and Content in Moral Psychology. Mind and Language 27 (5):519-545.
    According to Joshua Greene’s influential dual process model of moral judgment, different modes of processing are associated with distinct moral outputs: automatic processing with deontological judgment, and controlled processing with utilitarian judgment. This paper aims to clarify and assess Greene’s model. I argue that the proposed tie between process and content is based on a misinterpretation of the evidence, and that the supposed evidence for controlled processing in utilitarian judgment is actually likely to reflect generic deliberation which, ironically, is incompatible (...)
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  9. F. M. Kamm (2000). Collaboration and Responsibility. Philosophy and Public Affairs 28 (3):169-204.
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  10. F. M. Kamm (1992). Review: Non-Consequentialism, the Person as an End-in-Itself, and the Significance of Status. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Public Affairs 21 (4):354 - 389.
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  11. Will Kymlicka (1988). Rawls on Teleology and Deontology. Philosophy and Public Affairs 17 (3):173-190.
  12. Thaddeus Metz (forthcoming). A Relational Moral Theory: Ethics From Africa. Oxford University Press.
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  13. Thaddeus Metz (2015). Auf Dem Weg Zu Einer Afrikanischen Moraltheorie. In Franziska Dübgen & Stefan Skupien (eds.), Afrikanische politische Philosophie - Postkoloniale Positionen. Suhrkamp
    Revised version of 'Toward an African Moral Theory' (Journal of Political Philosophy 2007) appearing in German.
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  14. Sven Nyholm (2014). Ingmar Persson, From Morality to the End of Reason (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013), Pp. 336. [REVIEW] Utilitas 26 (3):321-325.
    Persson argues that common sense morality involves various “asymmetries” that don’t stand up to rational scrutiny. (One example is that intentionally harming others is commonly thought to be worse than merely allowing harm to happen, even if the harm involved is equal in both cases.) A wholly rational morality would, Persson argues, be wholly symmetrical. He also argues, however, that when we get down to our most basic attitudes and dispositions, we reach the “end of reason,” at which point we (...)
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  15. Michael Philips (1987). Moralism and the Good. Philosophical Studies 52 (1):131 - 139.
    It is often held that moral considerations take precedence over considerations of other kinds in determining what we ought to do. I contend that this claim is ambiguous and argue that objections to each interpretation of it can be met only by rejecting the other. One surprising consequence of my argument is that no deontic moral theory can effectively guide action unless it is conjoined with a theory of the good. Another interesting consequence is that the deontologists' favorite objection to (...)
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  16. Daniel N. Robinson and Rom Harre (1995). On the Primacy of Duties. Philosophy 70:513-532.
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  17. Luke Robinson (2012). Exploring Alternatives to the Simple Model: Is There an Atomistic Option? In Mark Timmons (ed.), Oxford Studies in Normative Ethics, Vol. 2. Oxford University Press
    The simple model maintains that morally relevant factors combine in a simple, additive way, like weights on a scale. Although intuitive and familiar, this model entails that certain plausible views about particular cases and how morally relevant factors combine and interact therein are false. Shelly Kagan suggests that we could accommodate the relevant views and interactions by rejecting either of two assumptions the simple model makes: that the moral status of an act is determined by the sum of the contributions (...)
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  18. Krzysztof Saja (2015). Etyka normatywna. Między konsekwencjalizmem a deontologią. Universitas.
    The primary goal of this monograph is to justify the possibility of building a hybrid theory of normative ethics which can combine ethical consequentialism, deontology and virtue ethics. The aim of the book is to demonstrate the possibility of constructing a synthetic theory from ethical traditions that are generally considered to be contradictory. In addition, I propose an outline of an original theory which tries to carry out such a synthesis. I call it Institutional Function Consequentialism. The justification for a (...)
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  19. Michael Smith (2011). Deontological Moral Obligations and Non-Welfarist Agent-Relative Values. Ratio 24 (4):351-363.
    Many claim that a plausible moral theory would have to include a principle of beneficence, a principle telling us to produce goods that are both welfarist and agent-neutral. But when we think carefully about the necessary connection between moral obligations and reasons for action, we see that agents have two reasons for action, and two moral obligations: they must not interfere with any agent's exercise of his rational capacities and they must do what they can to make sure that agents (...)
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  20. Franz Ungler (1979). Zu Fichtes Theorie des Gewissens. Wiener Jahrbuch für Philosophie 12:212-235.
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  21. Matt Zwolinski (2009). Review of Autonomy and Rights: The Moral Foundations of Liberalism. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 43 (2):255-262.
    This is a review of Horacio Spector's book on the occassion of its publiaction in paperback form in 2007. The version of the review posted here includes a number of footnotes and references that had to be deleted in the final published version.
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  1. Ryan Kemp (2011). The Contingency of Evil: Rethinking the Problem of Universal Evil in Kant's 'Religion'. In Oliver Thorndike (ed.), Rethinking Kant: Volume 3. Cambridge Scholars
    In this paper I explore how three seemingly incompatible Kantian theses–a libertarian notion of freedom, the inscrutability of one’s fundamental moral maxim, and the ubiquity of evil–can each be maintained without contradiction. I do this by arguing against the popular notion that in his 'Religion within the Bounds of Mere Reason,' Kant attributes 'radical evil' to all human beings.
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  2. Samuel Kerstein (2009). Treating Others Merely as Means. Utilitas 21 (2):163-180.
    In the Formula of Humanity, Kant embraces the principle that it is wrong for us to treat others merely as means. For contemporary Kantian ethicists, this Mere Means Principle plays the role of a moral constraint: it limits what we may do, even in the service of promoting the overall good. But substantive interpretations of the principle generate implausible results in relatively ordinary cases. On one interpretation, for example, you treat your opponent in a tennis tournament merely as a means (...)
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  3. E. R. Klein (2007). Space Exploration: Humanity's Single Most Important Moral Imperative. Philosophy Now 61:8-10.
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  4. Andrew Kope (2009). The Formula of Universal Law, by Extension, Provides the Universalizability Test for The. In David Papineau (ed.), Philosophy. Oxford University Press 2700--26.
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  5. Christine M. Korsgaard, A Kantian Case for Animal Rights.
    Most legal systems divide the world into persons and property, treating human beings as persons, and pretty much everything else, including non-human animals, as property. Persons are the subjects of both rights and obligations, including the right to own property, while objects of property, being by their very nature for the use of persons, have no rights at all. I will call this the “legal bifurcation.” We might look to Immanuel Kant’s moral and political philosophy to provide a philosophical vindication (...)
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  6. Manfred Kuehn (2009). Ethics and Anthropology in the Development of Kant's Moral Philosophy. In Jens Timmermann (ed.), Kant's Groundwork of the Metaphysics of Morals: A Critical Guide. Cambridge University Press
  7. Sudnya Kulkami (2001). The Categorical Imperative : Its Epistemological Status. Indian Philosophical Quarterly 28 (3):333.
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  8. S. Kulkarni (2001). The Categorical Imperative: Its Epistemological Status. Indian Philosophical Quarterly 28 (3):333-342.
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  9. Emil Kušan (2012). Aspects and Implications of Kant's Notion of Freedom. Filozofska Istrazivanja 32 (1):79-91.
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  10. Joyce Lazier (2011). Categorical Imperative as the Source for Morality. In Michael Bruce & Steven Barbone (eds.), Just the Arguments: 100 of the Most Important Arguments in Western Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell
    Kant's argument that the categorical imperative is the source for morality broken down into premise and conclusion logical format.
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  11. Kwang-Sae Lee (1991). Two Ways of Morality: Confucian and Kantian. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 18 (1):89-121.
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  12. James Lenman (1998). Review of Korsgaard's Creating the Kingdom of Ends (1996, CUP). [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 1 (4):487-8.
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  13. A. Lichtigfeld (1990). The Idea of Humanity. International Studies in Philosophy 22 (3):122-123.
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  14. Brendan E. A. Liddell (1959). Mr. Harsanyi on Hypothetical Imperatives. Mind 68 (272):527-529.
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  15. Andrew Linklater (1995). Richard Norman, Ethics, Killing and War, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 1995, Pp. X + 256. Utilitas 7 (02):337-.
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  16. Bryan Lueck (forthcoming). Contempt and Moral Subjectivity in Kantian Ethics. Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie.
    I argue in this paper that Immanuel Kant's account of the moral wrongness of contempt in the Metaphysics of Morals provides important resources for our understanding of the nature of moral subjectivity. Although Kant typically emphasizes the subject's position as autonomous addressor of the moral law, his remarks on contempt bring into relief a dynamic relationship at the heart of practical subjectivity between the addressor and addressee positions. After tracing the development of reflection concerning the addressor and addressee positions in (...)
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  17. Bryan Lueck (2015). Tact as Ambiguous Imperative: Merleau-Ponty, Kant, and Moral Sense-Bestowal. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 20 (1):195-211.
    I argue in this paper that some of the most basic commitments of Kantian ethics can be understood as grounded in the dynamic of sense that Merleau-Ponty describes in his Phenomenology of Perception. Specifically, I argue that Merleau-Ponty’s account supports the importance of universalizability as a test for the moral permissibility of particular acts as well as the idea that the binding character of the moral law is given as something like a fact of reason. But I also argue that (...)
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  18. Bryan Lueck (2008). Toward a Serresian Reconceptualization of Kantian Respect. Philosophy Today 52 (1):52-59.
    According to Immanuel Kant, moral experience is made possible by respect, an absolutely unique feeling in which the sensible and the intelligible are given immediately together. This paper argues that Kant's moral philosophy underemphasizes the role of this sensibility at the heart of moral experience and that a more rigorous conception of respect, grounded in Michel Serres's concepts of the parasite, the excluded/included third, and noise would yield a moral philosophy more consistent with Kant's own basic insights.
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  19. W. G. Maclagan (1953). The Nature of a Moral Duty. Philosophy 28 (107):353 - 354.
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  20. Jon Mandle (2010). Force and Freedom: Kant's Legal and Political Philosophy. Dialogue 49 (3):479-487.
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  21. Maksymilian Del Mar (2012). The Smithian Categorical Imperative. Archiv für Rechts- Und Sozialphilosophie 98:233-254.
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  22. John Marshall (1982). Hypothetical Imperatives. American Philosophical Quarterly 19 (January):105-114.
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  23. M. Mauri (2011). Self-Respect and Honesty. Filozofia 66:74-82.
    Self-esteem and self-respect refer to a way through which one relates to oneself, although they can be used as a synonymous expressions. On the basis of long tradition, since Kant ties self-respect to morality, all reference to self-respect has to be based on morality. Self-respect has a deeper root than self-esteem which is used to indicate a simple feeling of satisfaction with oneself without any value meaning. Self-respect is not a duty in itself but rather an acknowledgment of moral law (...)
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  24. George I. Mavrodes, Jan Narveson & J. W. Meiland (1964). Duties to Oneself. Analysis 24 (5):165 - 171.
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  25. Bernard Mayo & Basil Mitchell (1957). Varieties of Imperative. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 31:161-190.
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  26. Lovorka Mađarević (2009). Emotions as Motives in Kant's Ethics. Filozofska Istrazivanja 29 (2):335-348.
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  27. Richard McCarty (2015). False Negatives of the Categorical Imperative. Mind 124 (493):177-200.
    The categorical imperative can be construed as a universalization test for moral permissibility. False negatives of the categorical imperative would be maxims failing this test, despite the permissibility of their actions; maxims like: ‘I’ll withdraw all my savings on April 15th’. Examples of purported false negatives familiar from the literature can be grouped into three general categories, and dispatched by applying category-specific methods for proper formulation of their maxims, or for proper testing. Methods for reformulating failing maxims, such as the (...)
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  28. Richard R. McCarty (2006). Maxims in Kant's Practical Philosophy. Journal of the History of Philosophy 44 (1):65-83.
    : A standard interpretation of Kantian "maxims" sees them as expressing reasons for action, implying that we cannot act without a maxim. But recent challenges to this interpretation claim that Kant viewed acting on maxims as optional. Kant's understanding of maxims derives from Christian Wolff, who regarded maxims as major premises of the practical syllogism. This supports the standard interpretation. Yet Kant also viewed commitments to maxims as essential for virtue and character development, which supports challenges to the standard interpretation, (...)
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  29. Richard R. McCarty (1993). Kantian Moral Motivation and the Feeling of Respect. Journal of the History of Philosophy 31 (3):421-435.
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