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  1. Alexander Agnello (2014). A Review of "Disability & Justice: The Capabilities Approach in Practice", by Christopher A. Riddle. [REVIEW] Dialogue 7:1-3.
  2. Zachary Alexander (2009). A Buffet of Deserts: An Examination of the Underlying Principles of Desert in Job. Kairos: Evangelical Journal of Theology 3 (1):23-34.
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  3. John Altmann, Critiquing The Veil Of Ignorance.
    The present work is to be a critique of Rawls’ Veil of Ignorance as well as putting forth an alternative analytical tool when constructing societies known as the L’echelle Naturelle. My paper hopes to argue that inequalities in a society are not only essential in society contrary to Rawls’ Egalitarian ideology, but do in fact contain equality so long as the autonomy of the citizen is fully exercisable. I contend that institutions such as government and their extensions namely the law, (...)
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  4. Richard J. Arneson (2007). Desert and Equality. In Nils Holtug & Kasper Lippert-Rasmussen (eds.), Egalitarianism: New Essays on the Nature and Value of Equality. Clarendon Press. 262--293.
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  5. Sorin Baiasu (2007). Institutions and the Normativity of Desert. Contemporary Political Theory 6 (2):175.
    The question of whether desert depends on institutions or institutions on desert continues to divide politicians and political theorists, particularly in disputes over the justification of the welfare state. Even though it is a significant question with direct relevance for issues of economic justice, little has been done so far to evaluate the various positions in dispute and to make explicit the concepts involved. In this paper, I first present the main senses in which the concepts of desert, dependence and (...)
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  6. Adrian Bardon (2000). From Nozick to Welfare Rights: Self‐Ownership, Property, and Moral Desert. Critical Review 14 (4):481-501.
    Abstract The Kantian moral foundations of Nozickian libertarianism suggest that the claim that self?ownership grounds only negative rights to property should be rejected. The moral foundations of Nozick's libertarianism better support basing property rights on moral desert. It is neither incoherent nor implausible to say that need can be a basis for desert. By implication, the libertarian contention that persons ought to be respected as persons living self?shaping lives is inconsistent with the libertarian refusal to accept that claims of need (...)
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  7. Christian Barry, Redistribution. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  8. Christian Barry & Luara Ferracioli (2013). Young on Responsibility and Structural Injustice. [REVIEW] Criminal Justice Ethics 32 (3):247-257.
    Our aim in this essay is to critically examine Iris Young’s arguments in her important posthumously published book against what she calls the liability model for attributing responsibility, as well as the arguments that she marshals in support of what she calls the social connection model of political responsibility. We contend that her arguments against the liability model of conceiving responsibility are not convincing, and that her alternative to it is vulnerable to damaging objections.
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  9. Christian Barry & Matt Peterson (2011). Who Should Pay for the Damage of the Global Financial Crisis? In Ned Dobos Christian Barry & Thomas Pogge (eds.), Global Financial Crisis:The Ethical Issues. Palgrave.
  10. Christian Barry & Gerhard Øverland (2010). Why Remittances to Poor Countries Should Not Be Taxed. NYU Journal of International Law and Politics 42 (1):1180-1207.
  11. Robert Bass (2012). David Schmidtz, The Elements of Justice. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 46 (2):255-257.
    From Schmidtz, one might expect a theory of justice, basically along libertarian lines. The book may surprise, though not disappoint, for that is not quite what one would find. Instead, the title is apt. Schmidtz says that there is a terrain of justice, the terrain of what people are due, and it has a certain kind of unity.
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  12. André Berten (2001). What Do We Deserve. A Reader on Justice and Desert. Edited by Louis P. Pojman and Owen McLeod. Revue Philosophique De Louvain 99 (3):511-513.
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  13. Roberto Brigati (2014). Desert as a Principle of Distributive Justice A Reconsideration. Philosophy and Social Criticism 40 (7):705-722.
    Can desert be the foundation of justice? Recent attempts to redefine distributive justice in the light of the notions of desert and merit depend largely upon how much independent moral force can be attributed to these notions. This is why a number of theorists, following in Joel Feinberg’s wake, assume desert to be a natural feature (of an action, or a person, or a performance), independently of the institutions that may reward it, and of the socio-political background against which it (...)
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  14. Harry Brighouse & Adam Swift (2008). Putting Educational Equality in its Place. Educational Policy and Finance 3 (4):444-466.
  15. Thom Brooks (2012). Punishment. Routledge.
    Punishment is a topic of increasing importance for citizens and policy makers. Why should we punish criminals? Which theory of punishment is most compelling? Is the death penalty ever justified? These questions and many others are addressed in this highly engaging guide. Punishment is a critical introduction to the philosophy of punishment offering a new and refreshing approach that will benefit readers of all backgrounds and interests. This is the first critical guide to examine all leading contemporary theories of punishment, (...)
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  16. Thom Brooks (2008). Shame on You, Shame on Me? Nussbaum on Shame Punishment. Journal of Applied Philosophy 25 (4):322-334.
    abstract Shame punishments have become an increasingly popular alternative to traditional punishments, often taking the form of convicted criminals holding signs or sweeping streets with a toothbrush. In her Hiding from Humanity, Martha Nussbaum argues against the use of shame punishments because they contribute to an offender's loss of dignity. However, these concerns are shared already by the courts which also have concerns about the possibility that shaming might damage an offender's dignity. This situation has not led the courts to (...)
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  17. James H. Brown & S. K. Morgan Ernest (2002). Rain and Rodents: Complex Dynamics of Desert Consumers. BioScience 52 (11):979.
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  18. Peter Celello, Desert. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Desert Desert is a normative concept that is used in day-to-day life. Many believe that being treated as one deserves to be treated is a matter of justice, fairness, or rightness. Although desert claims come in a variety of forms, generally they are claims about some positive or negative treatment that someone or something ought […].
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  19. Peter Celello (2009). Against Desert as a Forward-Looking Concept. Journal of Applied Philosophy 26 (2):144-159.
    Fred Feldman and, more recently, David Schmidtz have challenged the standard view that a person's desert is based strictly on past and present facts about him. I argue that Feldman's attempt to overturn this 'received wisdom' about desert's temporal orientation is unsuccessful, since his examples do not establish that what a person deserves now can be based on what will occur in the future. In addition, his forward-looking account introduces an unnecessary asymmetry regarding desert's temporal orientation in different contexts. Schmidtz (...)
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  20. M. S. Chandla (1998). Jambhoji Messiah of the Thar Desert. Aurva Publications.
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  21. Dong-Ryul Choo (2014). EQUALITY, COMMUNITY, AND THE SCOPE OF DISTRIBUTIVE JUSTICE: A PARTIAL DEFENSE OF COHEN's VISION. Socialist Studies 10 (1):152-173.
    Luck egalitarians equalize the outcome enjoyed by people who exemplify the same degree of distributive desert by removing the influence of luck. They also try to calibrate differential rewards according to the pattern of distributive desert. This entails that they have to decide upon, among other things, the rate of reward, i.e., a principled way of distributing rewards to groups exercising different degrees of the relevant desert. However, the problem of the choice of reward principle is a relatively and undeservedly (...)
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  22. Shaun Nichols Christopher Freiman (2011). Is Desert in the Details? Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 82 (1):121-133.
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  23. Albert Clay (1924). The So-Called Fertile Crescent and Desert Bay. Journal of the American Oriental Society 44:186-201.
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  24. Jeffrey P. Cohn (1996). The Sonoran Desert Changing Face of the Desert Keeps Communities Dynamic. BioScience 46 (2):84-87.
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  25. Carlos Crespo (2013). Badain Jaran: The Forgotten Desert. Scheidegger and Spiess.
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  26. Giovanni De Grandis (2007). Moral Agents and Political Spectators. On Some Virtues and Vices of Rawls’s Liberalism. Politics and Ethics Review 2 (3):217-235.
    The paper defends the theoretical strength and consistency of Rawls's constructivism, showing its ability to articulate and convincingly weave together several key ethical ideas; yet it questions the political relevance of this admirable normative architecture. After having illustrated Rawls's conception of moral agency and practical reason, the paper tackles two criticisms raised by Scheffler. First the allegation of naturalism based on Rawls's disdain of common sense ideas on desert is rebutted. It is then shown that, contrary to Scheffler's contention, Rawls (...)
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  27. Teun J. Dekker (2009). Choices, Consequences and Desert. Inquiry 52 (2):109 – 126.
    It is a commonly held position in the literature on distributive justice that choices individuals make from an equalized background may lead to inequalities of outcome. This raises the question of how to assign consequences to particular types of behaviour. Theories of justice based on the concept of moral responsibility offer considerable guidance as to how society should be structured, but they rarely address the question of what the consequences of making a particular choice should be. To fill this lacuna, (...)
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  28. Manuel Alvarez Diestro (2013). New Cairo. Photos of an Emerging Gated City in the Desert. Topos: European Landscape Magazine 82:49.
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  29. Wadi Abu Diyeiba (2004). An Amethyst Mine in Egypt's Eastern Desert. Minerva 15 (6):12-14.
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  30. Alexandra Dobra (2011). OKIN's FEMINIST CHALLENGE TO RAWLS's THEORY OF JUSTICE. FROM THEORY TO PUBLIC ACTION. Studia Philosophica (1):51-64.
    The present paper aims to analyze Okin’s critique of Rawls’s theory of justice via a held argumentative dialogue. This critique is centred on Rawls’s dichotomy between public and private sphere, and its commitment to a purely political liberalism, both hindering the application of justice within the family. Hence, gender inequality is not inhibited at its origin, at the level of the patriarchal family. In order to achieve this inhibition, Okin aspires to use Rawls’s theory of justice as an epitome in (...)
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  31. Robert Doran (1982). The Lives of the Desert Fathers: The “Historia Monachorum in Aegypto.”. [REVIEW] Speculum 57 (3):655-656.
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  32. G. R. Driver (1962). BENOIT, MILIK and DE VAUX, "Discoveries in the Judaean Desert". Hibbert Journal 60 (37):164.
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  33. G. R. Driver (1955). BARTHELEMY and MILIK, Discoveries in the Judaean Desert, I. [REVIEW] Hibbert Journal 54:104.
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  34. Speranta Dumitru (2008). Are Rawlsians Entitled to Monopoly Rights? In A. Gosseries, A. Marciano & A. Strowel (eds.), Intelectual Property and Theories of Justice. Palgrave-MacMilan.
    Are intellectual property rights for talented people justified by Rawls’ criteria of justice? In this paper, I argue that Rawls’ theory of justice is ill-equipped to answer this question. Tailored for rival goods and, as a result, centred on the distribution of benefits, it tends to restate questions of justice about unequal rights as questions about economic inequalities. Therefore, it lacks the tools necessary to distinguish among different forms of incentives for talented people. Once social and economic inequalities observe equality (...)
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  35. David Ellerman (2014). On Property Theory. Journal of Economic Issues (3):601–624.
    A theory of property needs to give an account of the whole life-cycle of a property right: how it is initiated, transferred, and terminated. Economics has focused on the transfers in the market and has almost completely neglected the question of the initiation and termination of property in normal production and consumption (not in some original state or in the transition from common to private property). The institutional mechanism for the normal initiation and termination of property is an invisible-hand function (...)
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  36. David Ellerman (1995). Intellectual Trespassing as a Way of Life: Essays in Philosophy, Economics, and Mathematics. Rowman and Littlefield.
    Collection of published and unpublished essays covering most of my work up to 1990. Chapters 1 & 2 are about orthodox economics. Chapter 3 is the infamous pseudonymous spoof of Nozick, whose context and reaction is explained in the introduction. Chapter 4 puts the labor theory of property and democratic theory in a Kantian framework of treating persons as ends in themselves (instead of as rentable instruments of production). Chapter 5 shows how to reformulate marginal productivity theory using the fact (...)
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  37. Jill Frank (1998). Democracy and Distribution: Aristotle on Just Desert. Political Theory 26 (6):784-802.
  38. Christopher Freiman & Shaun Nichols (2011). Is Desert in the Details? Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 82 (1):121-133.
  39. Sharon Friedman (1970). IBP Desert Research Underway. BioScience 20 (18):1017-1019.
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  40. John Gardner & François Tanguay-Renaud (2011). Desert and Avoidability in Self-Defense. Ethics 122 (1):111-134.
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  41. Michele Giavazzi (2014). Desert as a Criterion of Justice. Against Unfair Equality. LPF Working Papers 5.
    The aim of this paper is to analyze the possible role of desert as a criterion of justice. I argue that most of the skeptical positions against it are largely erroneous and underestimate its efficiency as a tool for the realization of justice. The paper is focused on the political meaning of desert, and particularly on its relationship with equal opportunities and access to social and working positions. The main issue explored is whether social and political institutions should recognize desert’s (...)
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  42. Arthur C. Gibson (1998). Photosynthetic Organs of Desert Plants. BioScience 48.
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  43. William T. Gillis (1970). Desert Biology Desert Biology, Vol. 1 G. W. Brown, Jr. BioScience 20 (4):247-248.
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  44. Robert Goodin (1999). 25. Negating Positive Desert. In Louis P. Pojman & Owen McLeod (eds.), What Do We Deserve?: A Reader on Justice and Desert. Oxford University Press. 234.
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  45. Robert E. Goodin (1985). Negating Positive Desert Claims. Political Theory 13 (4):575-598.
  46. R. L. Gray (1995). San Esteban Chuckwallas Sauromalus Varius: An Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum Delight. Vivarium 6 (4):52-54.
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  47. Jake Greenblum (2010). Distributive and Retributive Desert in Rawls. Journal of Social Philosophy 41 (2):169-184.
    In this paper I examine John Rawls’s understanding of desert. Against Samuel Scheffler, I maintain that the reasons underlying Rawls’s rejection of the traditional view of distributive desert in A Theory of Justice also commit him to rejecting the traditional view of retributive desert. Unlike Rawls’s critics, however, I view this commitment in a positive light. I also argue that Rawls’s later work commits him to rejecting retributivism as a public justification for punishment.
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  48. Martin Grosjean (forthcoming). Holocene Climate and Cultural Changes in the Atacama Desert. Laguna.
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  49. Thomas Heath (1974). Dom Helder Camara, "The Desert is Fertile". [REVIEW] The Thomist 38 (4):994.
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  50. Edwin R. Helwig (1983). Desert Museum Pebbles in Your Shoes William H. Carr. BioScience 33 (11):718-718.
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