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Subcategories:History/traditions: Design Arguments for Theism
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  1. Muriel Blaisdell (1982). Natural Theology and Nature's Disguises. Journal of the History of Biology 15 (2):163 - 189.
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  2. John F. Cornell (1983). From Creation to Evolution: Sir William Dawson and the Idea of Design in the Nineteenth Century. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 16 (1):137 - 170.
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  3. Robert H. Hurlbutt (1965). Hume, Newton, and the Design Argument. Lincoln, University of Nebraska Press.
  4. Paul Lewis (2006). Darwin and Intelligent Design. Tradition and Discovery 33 (2):68-69.
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  5. Sherrie L. Lyons (1993). Thomas Huxley: Fossils, Persistence, and the Argument From Design. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 26 (3):545 - 569.
    In struggling to free science from theological implications, Huxley let his own philosophical beliefs influence his interpretation of the data. However, he was certainly not unique in this respect. Like the creationists he despised, he made many important contributions to the issue of progression in the fossil record and its relationship to evolutionary theory. Certainly other factors were involved as well. Undoubtedly, just the sheer inertia of ideas played a role. He was committed to a theory of type and was (...)
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  6. Graham Oppy (1996). Hume and the Argument for Biological Design. Biology and Philosophy 11 (4):519-534.
    There seems to be a widespread conviction — evidenced, for example, in the work of Mackie, Dawkins and Sober — that it is Darwinian rather than Humean considerations which deal the fatal logical blow to arguments for intelligent design. I argue that this conviction cannot be well-founded. If there are current logically decisive objections to design arguments, they must be Humean — for Darwinian considerations count not at all against design arguments based upon apparent cosmological fine-tuning. I argue, further, that (...)
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  7. James Dominic Rooney (2013). Evolutionary Biology and Classical Teleological Arguments for God's Existence. Heythrop Journal 54 (4):617-630.
    Much has been made of how Darwinian thinking destroyed proofs for the existence of God from ‘design’ in the universe. I challenge that prevailing view by looking closely at classical ‘teleological’ arguments for the existence of God. One version championed by Aristotle and Thomas Aquinas stems from how chance is not a sufficient kind of ultimate explanation of the universe. In the course of constructing this argument, I argue that the classical understanding of teleology is no less necessary in modern (...)
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Design Arguments for Theism, Misc
  1. Gregor Betz (2012). Lebende Bücher. In Georg Bertram (ed.), Philosophische Gedankenexperimente – ein Lese- und Studienbuch. Reclam.
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  2. Gregory Brown (1987). God's Phenomena and the Pre-Established Harmony. Studia Leibnitiana 19 (2):200-214.
    In this paper I wish to examine the nature and role of "the phenomena of God" in Leinbiz's mature thought. In the first part of the paper, I discuss the nature of the universal harmony and argue that they are the perceptiual states of finite substances and the relations among them that constitute God's phenomena. In the second part of the paper, I attempt to specify the theoretical role that God's phenomena play in Leibniz's phenomenalism. This leads finally to a (...)
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  3. Bowman L. Clarke (1974). The Argument From Design—a Piece of Abductive Reasoning. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 5 (2):65 - 78.
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  4. Helen de Cruz & Johan de Smedt (2010). Paley's Ipod: The Cognitive Basis of the Design Argument Within Natural Theology. Zygon 45 (3):665-684.
    The argument from design stands as one of the most intuitively compelling arguments for the existence of a divine Creator. Yet, for many scientists and philosophers, Hume's critique and Darwin's theory of natural selection have definitely undermined the idea that we can draw any analogy from design in artifacts to design in nature. Here, we examine empirical studies from developmental and experimental psychology to investigate the cognitive basis of the design argument. From this it becomes clear that humans spontaneously discern (...)
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  5. Danny Frederick (2013). A Puzzle About Natural Laws and the Existence of God. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 73 (3):269-283.
    The existence of natural laws, whether deterministic or indeterministic, and whether exceptionless or ceteris paribus, seems puzzling because it implies that mindless bits of matter behave in a consistent and co-ordinated way. I explain this puzzle by showing that a number of attempted solutions fail. The puzzle could be resolved if it were assumed that natural laws are a manifestation of God’s activity. This argument from natural law to God’s existence differs from its traditional counterparts in that, whereas the latter (...)
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  6. Joseph S. Fulda, Remarks on the Argument From Design.
    Gives two pared-down versions of the argument from design, which may prove more persuasive as to a Creator, discusses briefly the mathematics underpinning disbelief and nonbelief and its misuse and some proper uses, moves to why the full argument is needed anyway, viz., to demonstrate Providence, offers a theory as to how miracles (open and hidden) occur, viz. the replacement of any particular mathematics underlying a natural law (save logic) by its most appropriate nonstandard variant. -/- Note: This is an (...)
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  7. Philippe Gagnon (2005). Remarques Sur la Théologie Naturelle Anglo-Saxonne Aujourd’Hui. Connaître. Cahiers de l'Association Foi Et Culture Scientifique 22:83-108.
    This paper first outlines the main ideas of British natural theology, and shows the perennial value some of them have kept. It then outlines ways of searching for connections between God and nature, seeking traces of intelligence, first in the context of the setting of the modern ontology of the laws of nature, and then in the context of the design argument. It contrasts the positions of Hume and Paley. A presentation of recent "intelligent design" proposals is then offered, from (...)
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  8. Neal C. Gillespie (1987). Natural History, Natural Theology, and Social Order: John Ray and the "Newtonian Ideology". Journal of the History of Biology 20 (1):1 - 49.
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  9. S. Gliboff (2000). Paley's Design Argument as an Inference to the Best Explanation, or, Dawkins' Dilemma. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 31 (4):579-597.
  10. Peter J. Graham (2011). Intelligent Design and Selective History: Two Sources of Purpose and Plan. Oxford Studies in Philosophy of Religion 3:67-88.
  11. Wendy Hamblet (2006). God, Quantum Fields, and Distant Responsibilities: New Relations for a New Paradigm of Reality. Appraisal 6 (2):30 - 36.
    Quantum field theory is generally accepted by the modern scientific community as the most accurate paradigm for understanding the mystery of reality. This theory revolutionizes what we know as ’matter’ and how material things are connected. But is also confirms an ancient philosophical and ethical truth: the unfathomable mystery of being. Quantum field theory demonstrates that beings be in such a manner that their composite reality evades human cognition. Quantum field theory forces a rethinking of what we mean by ’world’, (...)
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  12. Kenneth Einar Himma, Design Arguments for the Existence of God. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  13. Michael Hooker (1982). Berkeley's Argument From Design. In Colin M. Turbayne (ed.), Berkeley: Critical and Interpretive Essays.
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  14. Douglas M. Jesseph (2005). Berkeley, God, and Explanation. In Christia Mercer (ed.), Early Modern Philosophy: Mind, Matter, and Metaphysics. Oxford University Press.
    This paper analyzes Berkeley's arguments for the existence of God in the Principles of Human Knowledge, Three Dialogues, and Alciphron. Where most scholarship has interpreted Berkeley as offering three quite distinct attempted proofs of God's existence, I argue that these are all variations on the strategy of inference to the best explanation. I also consider how this reading of Berkeley connects his conception of God to his views about causation and explanation.
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  15. Jeffery L. Johnson (1993). Inference to the Best Explanation and the New Teleological Argument. Southern Journal of Philosophy 31 (2):193-203.
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  16. A. David Kline (1987). Berkeley's Divine Language Argument. In Ernest Sosa (ed.), Essays on the Philosophy of George Berkeley. D. Reidel.
  17. John Leslie (1992). Design and the Anthropic Principle. Biology and Philosophy 7 (3):349-354.
  18. Moti Mizrahi (forthcoming). The Fine-Tuning Argument and the Simulation Hypothesis. Think.
    In this paper, I propose that, in addition to the multiverse hypothesis, which is commonly taken to be an alternative explanation for fine-tuning, other than the design hypothesis, the simulation hypothesis is another explanation for fine-tuning. I then argue that the simulation hypothesis undercuts the alleged evidential connection between ‘designer’ and ‘supernatural designer of immense power and knowledge’ in much the same way that the multiverse hypothesis undercuts the alleged evidential connection between ‘fine-tuning’ and ‘fine-tuner’ (or ‘designer’). If this is (...)
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  19. Jaime Nubiola (2004). Il Lume Naturale: Abduction and God. Semiotiche 1 (2):91-102.
    The aim of my paper is to highlight that for Peirce the reality of God makes sense of the whole scientific enterprise. The belief in God is a natural product of abduction, of the "rational instinct" or educated guess of the scientist or the layman, and also the abduction of God may be understood as a "proof" of pragmatism. Moreover, I want to suggest that for Peirce scientific activity is a genuine religious enterprise, perhaps even the religious activity par excellence, (...)
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  20. Graham Oppy, Review : 'God and Design', Ed. By N. Manson.
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  21. Elizabeth Salas (2009). Abduction and the Origin of “Musement”. International Philosophical Quarterly 49 (4):459-471.
    This paper is an evaluation of C. S. Peirce’s late essay “A Neglected Argument for the Reality of God” (1908), based on the two logical values that he calls “productiveness” and “security.” After reviewing the unique logical form of “abduction” and noting that it is a formal fallacy—and so enjoys less “security” than deduction or induction—I turn to the extraordinary case of abduction that is found in “A Neglected Argument.” I argue that the productiveness of the Neglected Argument is found (...)
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  22. George Schlesinger (1973). Probablistic Arguments for Divine Design. Philosophia 3 (1):1-16.
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  23. Jonah N. Schupbach (2005). Paley's Inductive Inference to Design. Philosophia Christi 7 (2):491-502.
    In a recent article, Graham Oppy offers a lucid and intriguing examination of William Paley's design argument. Oppy sets two goals for his article. First, he sets out to challenge the "almost universal assumption" that Paley's argument is inductive by revealing it actually to be a deductive argument. Second, he attempts to expose Paley's argument as manifestly poor when interpreted in this way. I will argue that Oppy is unsuccessful in accomplishing his first goal, leaving his second goal quite irrelevant. (...)
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  24. Elliott Sober (2004). The Design Argument. In William Mann (ed.), The Blackwell Guide to the Philosophy of Religion. Blackwell Pub..
  25. R. G. Swinburne (1972). The Argument From Design - a Defence. Religious Studies 8 (3):193 - 205.
    I DEFEND IN DETAIL AN EXPOSITION OF THE ARGUMENT FROM DESIGN IN "PHILOSOPHY" 1968 AGAINST A. OLDING’S RECENT ATTACK IN RELIGIOUS STUDIES. I JUSTIFY THE DUALISM UNDERLYING THE ORIGINAL EXPOSITION. I FIND OLDING GUILTY OF TWO INTERESTING FALLACIES OF INDUCTIVE LOGIC - THE SUPERSIMILARITY FALLACY (POSTULATING IN AN ARGUMENT FROM ANALOGY SIMILARITIES OF CAUSES IN RESPECTS IN WHICH DIFFERENCES OF EFFECTS SUGGEST DIFFERENCES OF CAUSES) AND THE COMPLETIST FALLACY (CLAIMING THAT AN EXPLANATION OF E BY C IS IMPERFECT UNLESS THE (...)
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  26. R. G. Swinburne (1968). The Argument From Design. Philosophy 43 (165):199 - 212.
    ARGUMENTS FROM DESIGN TO THE EXISTENCE OF GOD MAY TAKE AS THEIR PREMISS EITHER THE EXISTENCE OF REGULARITIES OF COPRESENCE OR THE EXISTENCE OF REGULARITIES OF SUCCESSION. THERE ARE NO VALID FORMAL OBJECTIONS TO A CAREFULLY ARTICULATED ARGUMENT OF THE LATTER TYPE. AGAINST SUCH AN ARGUMENT NONE OF THE OBJECTIONS IN HUME’S "DIALOGUES" HAVE ANY WORTH. THE ARGUMENT MAY HOWEVER GIVE ONLY A SMALL DEGREE OF SUPPORT TO ITS CONCLUSION.
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  27. Richard Swinburne (2006). Sobel on Arguments From Design. Philosophia Christi 8 (2):227 - 234.
    In his ’Logic and Theism’ Sobel claims that the allocation of prior probabilities to theories is a purely subjective matter. I claim that there are objective criteria for determining prior probabilities of theories (dependent on their simplicity and scope); and if there were not, science would be a totally irrational activity. I reject Sobel’s main criticism of my own cumulative argument for the existence of God that I argue illegitimately from each datum raising the probability of theism to the conjunction (...)
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  28. Richard Swinburne (2004). Design Defended. Think 6 (6):13 - 17.
    This paper responds to a number of articles critical of my paper, "Arguments from Design" in the first issue of ’Think’, by Norman, Bostrom, Dawkins, and Schick. It claims that the hypothesis that God sustains the laws of nature remains the simplest and so most probably true explanation of the existence and character of laws of nature.
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  29. Richard Swinburne (2004). The Argument From Laws of Nature Reassessed. In M. Ruse & W. Dembski (eds.), Debating Design: From Darwin to Dna. Cambridge Univ Pr.
    I analyze different accounts of laws of nature: the Hume-Lewis regularity account, the Armstrong-Tooley relations between universals account, and my preferred account in terms of the powers and liabilities of individual substances. On any account it is most unlikely a priori that a universe would be governed by simple laws of nature. But if there is a God, it is quite probable that he will choose to create free agents of limited power, and to put them in a universe governed (...)
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  30. Richard Swinburne (2002). Arguments From Design. Think 1 (1):49 - 54.
    I distinguish between the argument to the existence of God from the operation of laws of nature and the argument from the laws being of such a kind as (together with the boundary conditions of the universe) to lead to the evolution of humans. There could not be a ’scientific’ explanation of these data, but there could be a ’personal’ explanation that they were caused by a person in virtue of his powers and purposes. The simplest and so most probably (...)
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  31. Richard Swinburne (2000). Cosmological and Teleological Arguments. In The Rationality of Theism. Rodopi.
    After a discussion of several concepts of explanation, in which the criterion of simplicity is emphasized and some interesting historical examples are used as illustration, this paper presents the cosmological and teleological arguments. The central claim is that the hypothesis of theism is more simple and elegant and so more rational than any of its alternatives.
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  32. Richard Swinburne (1998). Teleologische Argumente. In Ch JäGer (ed.), Analytische Religionsphilosophie. Ferdinand Schã¶Ningh.
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  33. David Torrijos-Castrillejo (2011). Santo Tomás y el motor inmóvil. Revista Española de Filosofía Medieval 18:123-136.
    Alexander of Aphrodisias understood the Aristotle´s Unmoved Mover as efficient cause only to the extent that it is the final cause of heaven, which by moving strives to imitate the divine rest. Aquinas seems to agree with him. However his interpretation is original and philosophically more satisfactory: God is the efficient cause of the world, not only as creator, but also as it´s ruler. In this way God is also the final cause.
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