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  1. John F. Ahearne (1984). Nuclear Deterrence. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 59 (1):78-90.
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  2. Rodney Allen (1986). The Case for Unilateral Nuclear Disarmament. Critical Philosophy 3 (1/2):7.
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  3. By Anthony Ellis (2005). Punishment as Deterrence: Reply to Sprague. Philosophical Quarterly 55 (218):98–101.
    In my 'A Deterrence Theory of Punishment', I argued that a deterrence system of punishment can avoid the charge that it illegitimately uses offenders if its punishments are carried out 'quasiautomatically': threats are issued by a legislature for deterrent purposes, but those who carry out the punishments have no authority to take deterrent considerations into account. Sprague has objected that under such a system, those who carry out punishments will be unable to justify their actions. I reply that if it (...)
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  4. Susan B. Anthony (1984). Spiritual Deterrence in the Nuclear Age. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 59 (1):64-77.
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  5. David Ardagh (1990). The Immorality of Nuclear Deterrence. International Philosophical Quarterly 30 (3):343-358.
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  6. D. Attwood (1991). Threats and Nuclear Deterrence: Paul Ramsey's Account of the Morality of Nuclear Threats. Studies in Christian Ethics 4 (1):40-57.
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  7. Brenda M. Baker (1985). Duress, Responsibility, and Deterrence. Dialogue 24 (04):605-.
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  8. Jorg Baldauf (1985). Nuclear Weapons Free Zones in Europe: Problems and Prospects. Scientia 79:215.
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  9. Robert Barry (1988). Review Discussion: Can Deterrence Be Moral? The Thomist 52 (4):719.
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  10. S. I. Benn (1984). Deterrence or Appeasement? Or, On Trying to Be Rational About Nuclear War[1]. Journal of Applied Philosophy 1 (1):5-20.
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  11. Glacomo Bonanno, Deterrence, Observability and Awareness.
    ,d simple example is used to analyze the issue ofimperfcsct obseruabilitt of commitmerit and to highlight the follotving phenor»enon: u'hen a player h«s tlie option of taking — at a cost — a (potentiality' deterring action, she is less lil.ely to do so cigainst an opponent rgho is aware of' tlie aoailabilitt' of tliis opticrn thaii against an opponent it her is not..
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  12. Steven J. Brams & D. Marc Kilgour (1985). Optimal Deterrence. Social Philosophy and Policy 3 (01):118-.
    1. Introduction The policy of deterrence, at least to avert nuclear war between the superpowers, has been a controversial one. The main controversy arises from the threat of each side to visit destruction on the other in response to an initial attack. This threat would seem irrational if carrying it out would lead to a nuclear holocaust – the worst outcome for both sides. Instead, it would seem better for the side attacked to suffer some destruction rather than to retaliate (...)
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  13. Paul S. Brown (1985). Why Research on Defensive Weapons is Important. Scientia 79:349.
  14. Conrad G. Brunk (1988). John Finnis, Joseph Boyle, Jr., and Germain Grisez, Nuclear Deterrence, Morality and Realism Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 8 (10):393-395.
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  15. Sue Rabbitt Bulmer (2001). Nuclear Revisionism. Minerva 39 (2):259-264.
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  16. Arthur Lee Burns (1970). Ethics and Deterrence a Nuclear Balance Without Hostage Cities?
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  17. John Robert Burroughs (1991). Nuclear Obligations: Nuremberg Law, Nuclear Weapons, and Protest. Dissertation, University of California, Berkeley
    Nuclear weapons use and deployment and nonviolent anti-nuclear protest are evaluated in light of Nuremberg and other international law. ;Use of nuclear weapons would constitute war crimes and crimes against humanity as defined in both the Nuremberg Charter and Allied Control Council Law No. 10 and applied by the International Military Tribunal and other Nuremberg courts. Strategic and atomic bombing during World War II did not set a precedent for use of nuclear weapons. The consequentialist argument for World War II (...)
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  18. B. Sharon Byrd (1989). Kant's Theory of Punishment: Deterrence in its Threat, Retribution in its Execution. [REVIEW] Law and Philosophy 8 (2):151 - 200.
    Kant's theory of punishment is commonly regarded as purely retributive in nature, and indeed much of his discourse seems to support that interpretation. Still, it leaves one with certain misgivings regarding the internal consistency of his position. Perhaps the problem lies not in Kant's inconsistency nor in the senility sometimes claimed to be apparent in the Metaphysic of Morals, but rather in a superimposed, modern yet monistic view of punishment. Historical considerations tend to show that Kant was discussing not one, (...)
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  19. Duane L. Cady & Richard Werner (eds.) (1991). Just War, Nonviolence, and Nuclear Deterrence: Philosophers on War and Peace. Longwood Academic.
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  20. Theodore Caplow (2010). Armageddon Postponed: A Different View of Nuclear Weapons. Hamilton Books.
    Since the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, tens of thousands of nuclear weapons manufactured by governments around the world. None have been used so far, and the absence of nuclear war among armed nations is a mystery. Caplow considers this and other questions in his study of nuclear weaponry.
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  21. Lisa J. Carlson & Raymond Dacey (2010). Social Norms and the Traditional Deterrence Game. Synthese 176 (1):105 - 123.
    Bicchieri (The grammar of society: The nature and dynamics of norms, 2006, xi) presents a formal analysis of norms that answers the questions of "when, how, and to what degree" norms affect human behavior in the play of games. The purpose of this paper is to apply a variation of the Bicchieri norms analysis to generate a model of norms-based play of the traditional deterrence game (Zagare and Kilgour, Int Stud Q 37: 1-27, 1993; Morrow, Game theory for political scientists, (...)
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  22. Michael Carver (1985). The Problem of Extended Deterrence. Scientia 79:63.
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  23. R. Paul Churchill (1989). Nuclear Deterrence and Nuclear Paternalism. Social Philosophy Today 2:191-204.
  24. Stephen J. Cimbala (1987). "Launch Under Attack": The War Nobody Wanted. Journal of Social Philosophy 18 (2):26-32.
  25. C. A. J. Coady (1986). Analysing Deterrence. Critical Philosophy 3 (1/2):126.
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  26. Avner Cohen (1987). Lackey on Nuclear Deterrence: A Public Policy Critique or Applied Ethics Analysis?:Moral Principles and Nuclear Weapons. Douglas P. Lackey. Ethics 97 (2):457-.
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  27. David A. Conway (1974). Capital Punishment and Deterrence: Some Considerations in Dialogue Form. Philosophy and Public Affairs 3 (4):431-443.
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  28. David Copp (1986). Introduction: Deterrence and Disarmament. Canadian Journal of Philosophy, Supplementary Volume 12:1.
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  29. Raymond Paul Cuzzort (1989). Using Social Thought the Nuclear Issue and Other Concerns. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  30. Oksana Alexandria Dackiw (1988). Defense Policy and Public Opinion: The British Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament, 1945-1985. Dissertation, Columbia University
    This study is concerned with the rise and fall of anti-nuclear activism in Great Britain. Although anti-nuclear activists do not represent the majority of British public views on defense, their very vocal and highly visible activity can have major disruptive effects of U.S. foreign policy and the North Atlantic Treaty Organization. Moreover, insights into the anti-nuclear movement in Britain offer a standing point for a comparative assessment of analogous campaigns throughout Europe. ;In exploring this topic, the dissertation examines three key (...)
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  31. Paul W. Diener (1988). Nuclear Deterrence. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies 1 (1):47-70.
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  32. Thomas Donaldson (1987). Nonstrategic Nuclear Thinking:The Logic of Deterrence. Anthony Kenny; Nuclear Weapons and the Future of Humanity: The Fundamental Questions. Avner Cohen, Steven Lee. Ethics 97 (3):638-.
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  33. Thomas Donaldson (1985). Nuclear Deterrence and Self-Defense. Ethics 95 (3):537-548.
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  34. Erik W. Doxtader (1997). Total War and Public Life: A Critical Theory of American Nuclear Deterrence Policy. Dissertation, Northwestern University
    In the nuclear age, the American military claims that weapons of mass destruction are valuable because they prevent total war. This claim enacts a paradox. In it, democratic institutions propose that the possibility of political pluralism develops within a threat to annihilate civil society. This study argues that military institutions respond to this paradox by developing systems of nuclear deterrence. The study questions whether these systems structure public deliberation about matters of war and peace. Considering the period between 1960 and (...)
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  35. George Timothy Draper (1989). On Deontological Justifications of Nuclear Risks. Dissertation, University of California, Irvine
    Some nuclear ethicists have argued that, given a deontological moral perspective, the risks of nuclear deterrence are justified only if the benefits of deterrence greatly exceed those risks. My dissertation explores the possibility that this is a mistake, that the risks of deterrence can be justified within a deontological moral framework even if the benefits of deterrence are only slightly larger or even smaller than those risks. In the first chapter, I outline and briefly discuss eight possible deontological justifications of (...)
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  36. Kai Draper (1992). Book Review:Nuclear Deterrence and Moral Restraint. Henry Shue. [REVIEW] Ethics 103 (1):170-.
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  37. Anthony Duggan (2009). Gain-Based Remedies and the Place of Deterrence in the Law of Fiduciary Obligations. In Andrew Robertson & Hang Wu Tang (eds.), The Goals of Private Law. Hart Pub.
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  38. Michael Dummett (2013). The Morality of Deterrence. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 16 (sup1):111-127.
    (1986). The Morality of Deterrence. Canadian Journal of Philosophy: Vol. 16, Supplementary Volume 12: Nuclear Weapons, Deterrence and Disarmament, pp. 111-127.
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  39. Jocelyn Dunphy (1986). 'New Ways of Thinking': Rationality and the Nuclear Debate. Critical Philosophy 3 (1/2):81.
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  40. G. R. Dunstan (1982). Theological Method in the Deterrence Debate. In Geoffrey L. Goodwin (ed.), Ethics and Nuclear Deterrence. St. Martin's Press
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  41. Anthony Ellis (2005). Punishment as Deterrence: Reply to Sprague. Philosophical Quarterly 55 (218):98 - 101.
    In my 'A Deterrence Theory of Punishment', I argued that a deterrence system of punishment can avoid the charge that it illegitimately uses offenders if its punishments are carried out 'quasiautomatically': threats are issued by a legislature for deterrent purposes, but those who carry out the punishments have no authority to take deterrent considerations into account. Sprague has objected that under such a system, those who carry out punishments will be unable to justify their actions. I reply that if it (...)
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  42. Anthony Ellis (2003). A Deterrence Theory of Punishment. Philosophical Quarterly 53 (212):337–351.
    I start from the presupposition that the use of force against another is justified only in self-defence or in defence of others against aggression. If so, the main work of justifying punishment must rely on its deterrent effect, since most punishments have no other significant self-defensive effect. It has often been objected to the deterrent justification of punishment that it commits us to using offenders unacceptably, and that it is unable to deliver acceptable limits on punishment. I describe a sort (...)
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  43. Gertrude Ezorsky (1978). Ii. On Retributivism and Deterrence. Inquiry 21 (1-4):103 – 104.
    Alan Wertheimer claims the class of criminals who deserve punishment is identical with the class of criminals who are deferrable (Inquiry, Vol. 20 [1977]). According to Wertheimer this premise implies the conclusion that on ?the retributive account . . . the guilty are punished because we expect to alter (at least some) criminal behavior?. It is argued that this premise does not imply the conclusion.
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  44. Daniel M. Farrell (1985). The Justification of General Deterrence. Philosophical Review 94 (3):367-394.
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  45. Dm Farrell (1992). On Some Alleged Paradoxes of Deterrence. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 73 (2):114-136.
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  46. Robert K. Fullinwider (1988). Nuclear War: The Moral Dimension. Philosophical Books 29 (2):102-103.
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  47. Jonathan F. Galloway (1987). The Logics, Meta-Logic and Paradoxes of Nuclear Deterrence. Journal of Social Philosophy 18 (2):33-41.
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  48. David Gauthier (1984). Deterrence, Maximization, and Rationality. Ethics 94 (3):474-495.
  49. Noel Gayler (1985). The Way Out: A General Nuclear Settlement. Scientia 79:245.
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  50. Timothy J. Van Gelder (1989). Credible Threats and Usable Weapons: Some Dilemmas of Deterrence. Philosophy and Public Affairs 18 (2):158 - 183.
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