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  1. H. A. Abramson (ed.) (1953). Problems of Consciousness: Transactions of the Fourth Conference. Josiah Macy Foundation.
  2. Walter Randolph Adams (1993). The Parietal and Occipital Lobes and the Development of Consciousness: Some Preliminary Thoughts. Anthropology of Consciousness 4 (3):19-22.
  3. M. S. Albert, Adele D. Diamond, R. H. Fitch, Helen J. Neville, Petere R. Rapp & Paula A. Tallal (1999). Cognitive Development. In M. J. Zigmond & F. E. Bloom (eds.), Fundamental Neuroscience.
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  4. John R. Anderson (1984). The Development of Self-Recognition: A Review. Developmental Psychobiology 17:35-49.
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  5. James H. Austin (2000). Consciousness Evolves When the Self Dissolves. Journal of Consciousness Studies 7 (11-12):209-230.
    We need to clarify at least four aspects of selfhood if we are to reach a better understanding of consciousness in general, and of its alternate states. First, how did we develop our self-centred psychophysiology? Second, can the four familiar lobes of the brain alone serve, if only as preliminary landmarks of convenience, to help understand the functions of our many self-referent networks? Third, what could cause one's former sense of self to vanish from the mental field during an extraordinary (...)
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  6. Renée Baillargeon (2004). Can 12 Large Clowns Fit in a Mini Cooper? Or When Are Beliefs and Reasoning Explicit and Conscious? Developmental Science 7 (4):422-424.
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  7. Renee Baillargeon (1995). Physical Reasoning in Infancy. In Michael S. Gazzaniga (ed.), The Cognitive Neurosciences. Mit Press. 181--204.
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  8. Simon Baron-Cohen (1999). Can Studies of Autism Teach Us About Consciousness of the Physical and the Mental? Philosophical Explorations 2 (3):175-188.
    Most scientists and theorists concerned with the problem of consciousness focus on our consciousness of the physical world (our sensations, feelings, and awareness). In this paper I consider our consciousness of the mental world (our thoughts about thoughts, intentions, wishes, and emotions).The argument is made that these are two distinct forms of consciousness, the evidence for this deriving from studies of autism. Autism is a severe childhood psychiatric condition in which individuals may be conscious of the physical world but not (...)
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  9. Joe Becker (2008). Conceptualizing Mind and Consciousness: Using Constructivist Ideas to Transcend the Physical Bind. Human Development 51 (3):165-189.
    Philosophers and scientists seeking to conceptualize consciousness, and subjective experience in particular, have focused on sensation and perception, and have emphasized binding – how a percept holds together. Building on a constructivist approach to conception centered on separistic-holistic complexes incorporating multiple levels of abstraction, the present approach reconceptualizes binding and opens a new path to theorizing the emergence of consciousness. It is proposed that all subjective experience involves multiple levels of abstraction, a central feature of conception. This modifies the prevalent (...)
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  10. Joe Becker (2004). Reconsidering the Role of Overcoming Perturbations in Cognitive Development: Constructivism and Consicousness. Human Development 47 (2):77-93.
    Constructivist theory must choose between the hypothesis that felt perturbation drives cognitive development (the priority of felt perturbation) and the hypothesis that the particular process that eventually produces new cognitive structures first produces felt perturbation (the continuity of process). There is ambivalence in Piagetian theory regarding this choice. The prevalent account of constructivist theory adopts the priority of felt perturbation. However, on occasion Piaget has explicitly rejected it, simultaneously endorsing the continuity of process. First, I explicate and support this latter (...)
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  11. Preben Bertelsen (1999). Development of Phenomenological Consciousness in Early Childhood. Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 19 (2):195-216.
    This article presents a developmental model of phenomenological consciousness in early childhood . A 3-stage developmental model is constructed, based on the understanding of phenomenological consciousness as modeling activity structured by the directedness at/by the world in general and directedness at/by directedness in particular. Thereby, it is demonstrated that it is in the interaction with other people and the structure and content of their phenomenological consciousness, i.e., their directedness and their modeling of the world, that the development of fully accomplished (...)
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  12. Marc Bornstein & A. O'Reilly (eds.) (1993). The Role of Play in the Development of Thought. Jossey-Bass.
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  13. Matt Bower (2014). Developing Open Intersubjectivity: On the Interpersonal Shaping of Experience. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences:1-20.
    The aim of this paper is to motivate the need for and then present the outline of an alternative explanation of what Dan Zahavi has dubbed “open intersubjectivity,” which captures the basic interpersonal character of perceptual experience as such. This is a notion whose roots lay in Husserl’s phenomenology. Accordingly, the paper begins by situating the notion of open intersubjectivity – as well as the broader idea of constituting intersubjectivity to which it belongs – within Husserl’s phenomenology as an approach (...)
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  14. C. J. Brainerd, L. M. Stein & V. F. Reyna (1998). On the Development of Conscious and Unconscious Memory. Developmental Psychology 34:342-357.
  15. Gavin Bremner & Alan Slater (eds.) (2004). Theories of Infant Development. Blackwell.
    This volume provides an authoritative, up-to-date survey of theories of infant development.
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  16. A. S. Briskin (1974). A Developmental Model of Self-Awareness. Counseling and Values 18:79-85.
  17. John A. Burgess & S. A. Tawia (1996). When Did You First Begin to Feel It? Locating the Beginnings of Human Consciousness? Bioethics 10 (1):1-26.
    In this paper we attempt to sharpen and to provide an answer to the question of when human beings first become conscious. Since it is relatively uncontentious that a capacity for raw sensation precedes and underpins all more sophisticated mental capacities, our question is tantamount to asking when human beings first have experiences with sensational content. Two interconnected features of our argument are crucial. First, we argue that experiences with sensational content are supervenient on facts about electrical activity in the (...)
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  18. George Butterworth (1995). The Self as an Object of Consciousness in Infancy. In P. Rochat (ed.), The Self in Infancy: Theory and Research. Elsevier.
  19. S. Carey (1988). Cognitive Development in Childhood. In Stephen Schiffer & Susan Steele (eds.), Cognition and Representation. Westview Press. 131--160.
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  20. Roland Case (ed.) (1991). The Mind's Staircase: Exploring the Conceptual Underpinnings of Children's Thought and Knowledge. Lawrence Erlbaum.
    This volume describes the current "main contenders," including neo-Piagetian, neo-connectionist, neo-innatist and sociocultural models.
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  21. Chuanfei Chin (2011). Models as Interpreters (with a Case Study From Pain Science). Studies in History and Philosophy of Science 42 (2):303-312.
    Most philosophical accounts of scientific models assume that models represent some aspect, or some theory, of reality. They also assume that interpretation plays only a supporting role. This paper challenges both assumptions. It proposes that models can be used in science to interpret reality. (a) I distinguish these interpretative models from representational ones. They find new meanings in a target system’s behaviour, rather than fit its parts together. They are built through idealisation, abstraction and recontextualisation. (b) To show how interpretative (...)
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  22. F. Clement & Abraham J. Malerstein (2003). What is It Like to Be Conscious? The Ontogenesis of Consciousness. Philosophical Psychology 16 (1):67-85.
    In recent years, numerous studies have tried to highlight, from a naturalistic point of view, the apparent mysteries of consciousness. Many authors concentrated their efforts on explaining the phylogenetic origins of consciousness. Paradoxically, comments on the ontogenesis of consciousness are almost nonexistent. By crossing the results of psychology of development with a philosophical analysis, this paper aims to make up for this omission. After having characterized the different conceptual aspects of consciousness, we combine these, with observations made by developmental psychologists, (...)
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  23. Brian Coffey (1949). The Next Development In Man. Modern Schoolman 26 (4):372-373.
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  24. Michael Cowen (2000). Quakes of Development. Historical Materialism 6 (1):149-214.
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  25. Bernard Curtis & Wolfe Mays (eds.) (1978). Phenomenology and Education: Self-Consciousness and its Development. Methuen.
    Kierkegaard's theory of subjectivity and education/ louis p. pojman In this paper I shall first locate Kierkegaard's idea of subjectivity within the history ...
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  26. Philip David Zelazo, Helena H. Gao & Rebecca M. Todd (2007). The Development of Consciousness. In Philip David Zelazo, Morris Moscovitch & Evan Thompson (eds.), The Cambridge Handbook of Consciousness. Cambridge.
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  27. Leon de Bruin, Derek Strijbos & Marc Slors (2011). Early Social Cognition: Alternatives to Implicit Mindreading. [REVIEW] Review of Philosophy and Psychology 2 (3):499-517.
    According to the BD-model of mindreading, we primarily understand others in terms of beliefs and desires. In this article we review a number of objections against explicit versions of the BD-model, and discuss the prospects of using its implicit counterpart as an explanatory model of early emerging socio-cognitive abilities. Focusing on recent findings on so-called ‘implicit’ false belief understanding, we put forward a number of considerations against the adoption of an implicit BD-model. Finally, we explore a different way to make (...)
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  28. Judy S. DeLoache (2004). Scale Errors by Very Young Children: A Dissociation Between Action Planning and Control. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (1):32-33.
    Very young children occasionally commit scale errors, which involve a dramatic dissociation between planning and control: A child's visual representation of the size of a miniature object is not used in planning an action on it, but is used in the control of the action. Glover's planning–control model offers a very useful framework for analyzing this newly documented phenomenon.
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  29. Stephanie Denison & Fei Xu (2010). Integrating Physical Constraints in Statistical Inference by 11-Month-Old Infants. Cognitive Science 34 (5):885-908.
    Much research on cognitive development focuses either on early-emerging domain-specific knowledge or domain-general learning mechanisms. However, little research examines how these sources of knowledge interact. Previous research suggests that young infants can make inferences from samples to populations (Xu & Garcia, 2008) and 11- to 12.5-month-old infants can integrate psychological and physical knowledge in probabilistic reasoning (Teglas, Girotto, Gonzalez, & Bonatti, 2007; Xu & Denison, 2009). Here, we ask whether infants can integrate a physical constraint of immobility into a statistical (...)
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  30. S. Derbyshire (2001). Fetal Pain: An Infantile Debate. Bioethics 15 (1):77-84.
  31. Ralph D. Ellis (ed.) (2000). The Caldron of Consciousness: Motivation, Affect and Self-Organization. John Benjamins.
  32. James E. Faulconer & R. Williams (eds.) (1990). Reconsidering Psychology. Duquesne University Press.
  33. Gary D. Fireman, T. E. McVay & Owen J. Flanagan (eds.) (2003). Narrative and Consciousness: Literature, Psychology and the Brain. Oxford University Press.
    We define our conscious experience by constructing narratives about ourselves and the people with whom we interact. Narrative pervades our lives--conscious experience is not merely linked to the number and variety of personal stories we construct with each other within a cultural frame, but is subsumed by them. The claim, however, that narrative constructions are essential to conscious experience is not useful or informative unless we can also begin to provide a distinct, organized, and empirically consistent explanation for narrative in (...)
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  34. E. Fivaz-Depeursinge, N. Favez & F. Frascarolo (2004). Threesome Intersubjectivity in Infancy: A Contribution to the Development of Self-Awareness. In Dan Zahavi, T. Grunbaum & Josef Parnas (eds.), The Structure and Development of Self-Consciousness: Interdisciplinary Perspectives. John Benjamins.
  35. John H. Flavell (1993). Young Children's Understanding of Thinking and Consciousness. Current Directions in Psychological Science 2:40-43.
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  36. John H. Flavell, F. L. Green & E. R. Flavell (2000). Development of Children's Awareness of Their Own Thoughts. Journal of Cognition and Development 1 (1):97-112.
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  37. John H. Flavell, F. L. Green & E. R. Flavell (1995). The Development of Children's Knowledge About Attentional Focus. Developmental Psychology 31:706-12.
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  38. John H. Flavell, F. L. Green & E. R. Flavell (1993). Children's Understanding of the Stream of Consciousness. Child Development 64:387-398.
  39. John H. Flavell, F. L. Green, E. R. Flavell & J. B. Grossman (1997). The Development of Children's Knowledge About Inner Speech. Child Development 68:39-47.
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  40. D. Foulkes (1999). Children's Dreaming and the Development of Consciousness. Harvard University Press.
    In this book, which distills a lifetime of study, Foulkes shows that dreaming as we normally understand it--active stories in which the dreamer is an actor-...
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  41. Shaun Gallagher & Andrew N. Meltzoff (1996). The Earliest Sense of Self and Others: Merleau-Ponty and Recent Developmental Studies. Philosophical Psychology 9 (2):211-33.
    Recent studies in developmental psychology have found evidence to suggest that there exists an innate system that accounts for the possibilities of early infant imitation and the existence of phantom limbs in cases of congenital absence of limbs. These results challenge traditional assumptions about the status and development of the body schema and body image, and about the nature of the translation process between perceptual experience and motor ability.
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  42. Alison Gopnik (2007). Why Babies Are More Conscious Than We Are. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (5-6):503-504.
    Block argues for a method and a substantive thesis – that consciousness overflows accessibility. The method can help answer the question of what it is like to be a baby. Substantively, infant consciousness may be accessible in some ways but not others. But development itself can also add important methodological tools and substantive insights to the study of consciousness.
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  43. Alison Gopnik & Andrew N. Meltzoff (1994). Minds, Bodies, and Persons: Young Children's Understanding of the Self and Others as Reflected in Imitation and Theory of Mind Research. In S. T. Parker, R. Mitchell & M. L. Boccia (eds.), Self-Awareness in Animals and Humans: Developmental Perspectives. Cambridge University Press.
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  44. Susan Griffin (1991). Young Children's Awareness of Their Inner World: A Neo-Structural Analysis of the Development of Intrapersonal Intelligence. In Roland Case (ed.), The Mind's Staircase: Exploring the Conceptual Underpinnings of Children's Thought and Knowledge. Lawrence Erlbaum.
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  45. Thor Gruenbaum, Dan Zahavi & Josef Parnas (eds.) (2004). The Structure and Development of Self-Consciousness: Interdisciplinary Perspectives. Amsterdam: J Benjamins.
  46. Valerie Gray Hardcastle (2003). The Development of the Self. In Gary D. Fireman, T. E. McVay & Owen J. Flanagan (eds.), Narrative and Consciousness. Oxford University Press.
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  47. M. Esther Harding (1965/1973). The "I" and the "Not-I": A Study in the Development of Consciousness. Princeton University Press.
    This book provides a very accessible general introduction to the Jungian concept of ego development and Jung's theory of personality structure--the collective unconscious, anima, animus, shadow, archetypes.
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  48. Peter Hobson, Gayathri Chidambi, Anthony Lee & Jessica Meyer (2006). Foundations for Self-Awareness: An Exploration Through Autism. Monographs of the Society for Research in Child Development.
  49. R. Peter Hobson (2006). Developing Self/Other Awareness: A Reply. Monographs of the Society for Research in Child Development 71 (2):180-186.
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  50. Mark L. Howe (2000). Consciousness, Memory, and Development. In The Fate of Early Memories: Developmental Science and the Retention of Childhood Experiences. American Psychological Association. 105-118.
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