About this topic
Summary

Developmental Biology is the study of organisms’ life cycles from single cell to complex reproducing and aging multi-cellular organisms. It endeavours to explain phenomena such as: cellular differentiation (e.g. neurons vs. liver cells) and cellular aging, the development of gross morphology and anatomical structures (e.g. body shape and organs -eyes and limbs-), and the development of an organism as an integrated part of an eco-system (e.g. phenotypic plasticity). The philosophically relevant points, in addition to broader philosophy of science inquiries (e.g. confirmation and explanation) are those that have to do with the ontological status of biological kinds and with inter-level relations, specifically the integration of developmental biology with evolutionary biology and to a lesser extent, with ecology. Keeping this is in mind the subcategories within Developmental Biology can be grouped into three main themes: evolution(Evolutionary-Developmental Biology, Developmental Constraints and Process Structuralism)ecology (Ecological Developmental Biology, Epigenetic Inheritance, Nature vs. Nurture and Innateness) and ontology (Developmental Modularity, Developmental System Theory and Process Structuralism).

Key works Key works will be arranged by sub-category and cited there.
  Show all references
Related categories
Subcategories:
903 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Order:
1 — 50 / 903
Material to categorize
  1. Joachim W. Deitmer (2000). Glial Strategy for Metabolic Shuttling and Neuronal Function. Bioessays 22 (8):747-752.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  2. Bruce Demple (1987). Adaptive Responses to Genotoxic Damage: Bacterial Strategies to Prevent ‐Mutation and Cell Death. Bioessays 6 (4):157-160.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3. Rob Denell (1987). Insect Developmental Genetics – Moving Beyond Drosophila. Bioessays 6 (2):77-79.
  4. Alessandro Dini (1987). Scienze della vita e filosofia nel Seicento e Settecento. [REVIEW] History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 9 (2):327 - 332.
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5. Hans Driesch (1937). Studien Zur Theorie der Organischen Formbildung. Acta Biotheoretica 3 (1):51-80.
    The concept of embryological “exactness” is introduced; it becomes rather complicated if a called interaction of embryological parts is in question. From the point of view of the biological mechanist “exactness” is ultimately founded upon a given material structure. The experiment is the only possible way to decide, whether the mechanistic view is right or not; mere description does not suffice here. The decision is in favor of so called vitalism. The “harmonious-equipotential system” implies “exactness”. The “genes” are not the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6. Hans Driesch (1936). Zur Kritik Des „Holismus”. Acta Biotheoretica 1 (3):185-202.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7. François Duchesneau (1985). Embryologie au XVIII E Siècle: L'Interprétation de S. Roe. [REVIEW] History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 7 (2):321 - 327.
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8. Catherine M. Duckett & John C. Gray (1995). Illuminating Plant Development. Bioessays 17 (2):101-103.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9. Michael Eisenbach & Ilan Tur‐Kaspa (1999). Do Human Eggs Attract Spermatozoa? Bioessays 21 (3):203-210.
  10. Lorenz Engell (2011). Ontogenetic Machinery. Radical Philosophy 169:10.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11. Richard G. A. Faragher & David Kipling (1998). How Might Replicative Senescence Contribute to Human Ageing? Bioessays 20 (12):985-991.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12. Willy Feller (1940). On the Logistic Law of Growth and its Empirical Verifications in Biology. Acta Biotheoretica 5 (2):51-66.
    Es wird untersucht, wie weit den empirischen Bestätigungen der logistischen Differentialgleichung als Ausdruck eines biologischen Wachstumsgesetzes tatsächliche Beweiskraft zukommt. Durch eine Reihe praktischer Ausgleichungen wurde geprüft, welche Güte der Annäherung im Durchschnitt zu erwarten ist, wenn durch eine beliebige andere dreiparametrige ScharS-förmiger Kurven ersetzt wird und ). Es zeigt sich überraschenderweise, dass sich die logistische Kurve keineswegs besonders gut dem biologischen Material anpasst, und dass letzteres auch mit ganz anderen Hypothesen vereinbar wäre. Ähnliches gilt auch von den Experimenten vonGause bewiesen (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13. S. M. Frisch (1995). Development, Databases and the Internet. Bioessays 17:1002-1002.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14. C. Galperin (1999). [From experimental embryology to a genetics of development: from Hans Spemann to Antonio Garcia-Bellido]. Revue d'Histoire des Sciences 53 (3-4):581-616.
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15. M. Ghiselin (2002). Christine Hertler, Morphologische Methoden in der Evolutionsforschung. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 23 (2):318-318.
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16. Paul E. Griffiths (2001). Genetic Information: A Metaphor in Search of a Theory. Philosophy of Science 68 (3):394-412.
    John Maynard Smith has defended against philosophical criticism the view that developmental biology is the study of the expression of information encoded in the genes by natural selection. However, like other naturalistic concepts of information, this ‘teleosemantic’ information applies to many non-genetic factors in development. Maynard Smith also fails to show that developmental biology is concerned with teleosemantic information. Some other ways to support Maynard Smith’s conclusion are considered. It is argued that on any definition of information the view that (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   37 citations  
  17. Thomas Grigliatti (1985). Developmental Biology and Genetics: An Informative Overview. Genetics and Development. By JAMES H. SANG. Longman, 1984. Pp. 398. £10.50. [REVIEW] Bioessays 3 (6):278-279.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18. Lia Hemerik, Nelly van der Hoeven & Jacques J. M. van Alphen (2002). Egg Distributions and the Information a Solitary Parasitoid has and Uses for its Oviposition Decisions. Acta Biotheoretica 50 (3):167-188.
    Approximately three decades ago the question was first answered whether parasitoids are able to assess the number or origin of eggs in a host for a solitary parasitoid, Leptopilina heterotoma, by fitting theoretically derived distributions to empirical ones. We extend the set of different theoretically postulated distributions of eggs among hosts by combining searching modes and abilities in assessing host quality. In the models, parasitoids search either randomly (Poisson) (1) or by vibrotaxis (Negative Binomial) (2). Parasitoids are: (a) assumed to (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19. David B. Hershenov (2002). Olson's Embryo Problem. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 80 (4):502-511.
  20. Leonard Hersher (1985). On the Development of Certain Species of Very Large Body Size by Linear-Dominance Mating Hierarchy. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 29 (1):88-91.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21. Nicole H. Hess & Shane J. Macfarlan (2013). Review of Daniel J. Hruschka's Friendship: Development, Ecology, and Evolution of a Relationship (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2010). [REVIEW] Human Nature 24 (3):348-350.
  22. L. T. Hobhouse (1927/1969). Development and Purpose. Grosse Pointe, Mich.,Scholarly Press.
    purpose, the train of events which it sets up and the* ultimate end are seen as an ... Conversely, an organic whole is one which is determined by a purpose. ...
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  23. Geoffrey M. Hodgson & Thorbjørn Knudsen (2008). Information, Complexity and Generative Replication. Biology and Philosophy 23 (1):47-65.
    The established definition of replication in terms of the conditions of causality, similarity and information transfer is very broad. We draw inspiration from the literature on self-reproducing automata to strengthen the notion of information transfer in replication processes. To the triple conditions of causality, similarity and information transfer, we add a fourth condition that defines a “generative replicator” as a conditional generative mechanism, which can turn input signals from an environment into developmental instructions. Generative replication must have the potential to (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  24. Felix J. H. Hol, Xin Wang & Juan E. Keymer (2012). Population Structure Increases the Evolvability of Genetic Algorithms. Complexity 17 (5):58-64.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  25. Gábor Holló (2014). Animals Are Both Radially and Bilaterally Symmetrical: Accommodating Seemingly Mutually Exclusive Paradigms. Bioessays 36 (9):901-902.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26. Ekkehard Höxtermann (1994). Zur Geschichte des Hormonbegriffes in der Botanik und zur Entdeckungsgeschichte der 'Wuchsstoffe'. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 16 (2):311 - 337.
    The beginning of hormone research in the history of botany is discussed. Specific growth substances had been assumed to explain organ correlations in plants long before the term hormone was introduced into physiology. Progress in medical endocrinology did not initially have a particularly deep influence on physiology of plant development. Only a few botanists used the hormone concept without, however, having great resonance. Studies on phototropic responses led to the acceptance of growth regulating substances. But doubts arose if these plant (...)
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27. David L. Hull (2006). The Essence of Scientific Theories. Biological Theory 1 (1):17-19.
  28. David L. Hull (1998). A Clash of Paradigms or the Sound of One Hand Clapping. Biology and Philosophy 13 (4):587-595.
  29. David L. Hull (1988). A Period of Development: A Response. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 3 (2):241-263.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   38 citations  
  30. Philippe Huneman (2013). Causal Parity and Externalisms: Extensions in Life and Mind. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 23 (3):377-404.
    This paper questions the form and prospects of “extended theories” which have been simultaneously and independently advocated both in the philosophy of mind and in the philosophy of biology. It focuses on Extend Mind Theory (EMT) and Developmental Systems Theory (DST). It shows first that the two theories vindicate a parallel extension of received views, the former concerning extending cognition beyond the brain, the latter concerned with extending evolution and development beyond the genes. It also shows that both arguments rely (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  31. Philippe Huneman, Reflexive Judgement and Wolffian Embryology: Kant's Shift Between the First and the Third Critique.
    The problem of generation has been, for Kant scholars, a kind of test of Kant's successive concepts of finality. Although he deplores the absence of a naturalistic account of purposiveness (and hence of reproduction) in his pre-critical writings, in the First Critique he nevertheless presents a "reductionist" view of finality in the Transcendental Dialectic's Appendices. This finality can be used only as a language, extended to the whole of nature, but which must be filled with mechanistic explanations. Therefore, in 1781, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  32. Philip Husbands, Andrew Philippides, Patricia Vargas, Christopher L. Buckley, Peter Fine, Ezequiel Di Paolo & Michael O'Shea (2010). Spatial, Temporal, and Modulatory Factors Affecting GasNet Evolvability in a Visually Guided Robotics Task. Complexity 16 (2):35-44.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  33. Hans Werner Ingensiep (2004). The History of the Plant Embryo. Terminology and Visualization From Ancient Until Modern Times. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 26 (3/4):309 - 331.
    Since ancient times comparisons between embryonic forms of humans, animals, and plants are known. In deciphering a plant embryo and its development, one applied a specific zoomorphic terminology. Until the 17th century naturalists who studied plants were inspired by the concepts of ancient natural philosophy. Since then plant embryos are visualized by drawings and diagrammatic sketches. In the 18th century the embryo became an important issue in debates concerning theories of generation and the analogy between animal egg and vegetable seed (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34. L. S. Jacyna (2003). Moral Fibre: The Negotiation of Microscopic Facts in Victorian Britain. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 36 (1):39 - 85.
    During the 1840s and 1850s the British embryologist and histologist Martin Barry (1802-1855) propounded a bold and original thesis about the microscopic structure of animal and vegetable tissue. He maintained that minute double spirals were virtually ubiquitous in the makeup of a wide range of structures. This paper considers how a claim of this kind was consonant with a romantic image of scientific creativity with which Barry identified. It describes his partially successful strategies to convince contemporaries of the veracity of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35. Sybillyn Jennings (2012). Learning to Dance with Maxine Sheets-Johnstone: Maxine Sheets-Johnstone: The Primacy of Movement, John Benjamins, Amsterdam, 2011, 2nd Expanded Edition, 574 Pp, $49.95 Pbk, ISBN 978-9027252197 (Book Review). [REVIEW] Biological Theory 6 (2):184-186.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36. George H. Jensen (2010). Evolvability of Consciousness. Revista Portuguesa de Filosofia 66 (4):881 - 895.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37. Jukka Jernvall (2013). The Causality Horizon and the Developmental Bases of Morphological Evolution. Biological Theory 8 (3):286-292.
    With the advent of evolutionary developmental research, or EvoDevo, there is hope of discovering the roles that the genetic bases of development play in morphological evolution. Studies in EvoDevo span several levels of organismal organization. Low-level studies identify the ultimate genetic changes responsible for morphological variation and diversity. High-level studies of development focus on how genetic differences affect the dynamics of gene networks and epigenetic interactions to modify morphology. Whereas an increasing number of studies link independent acquisition of homoplastic or (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38. MiloŠ Jílek (1975). Stochastic Development of Cell Populations Under Non-Homogeneous Conditions. Acta Biotheoretica 24 (3-4):108-119.
    Studies on the development of cell populations are often based on results of the theory of stochastic birth- and death-processes (continuous or discrete (seee.g. references inVogel, Niewisch &Matioli (1969), in some cases, death may be interpreted not as actual death of the cell bute.g. as a recruitment of the cell considered into another cell compartment, etc.). It is usually assumed that the conditions for the development are homogeneous,i.e. that the probabilities of births and deaths are independent on the time. However, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39. Jas Johnstone (1932). Chemical Embryology. By Joseph Needham. (London: Cambridge University Press. 1931. 3 Vols.). Philosophy 7 (27):354-.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40. J. Kaplan (2008). Review of Genes in Development: Rereading the Molecular Paradigm Edited by Eva M. Neumann-Held and Christoph Rehmann-Sutter. [REVIEW] Biological Theory 2:427-429.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  41. Laurent Kappeler & Michael J. Meaney (2010). Epigenetics and Parental Effects. Bioessays 32 (9):818-827.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42. S. Kauffman (1990). Requirements for Evolvability in Complex Systems. In W. Zurek (ed.), Complexity, Entropy, and the Physics of Information. Addison-Wesley 151--192.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  43. Stuart A. Kauffman (1990). The Sciences of Complexity and "Origins of Order". PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1990:299 - 322.
    This article discusses my book, Origins of Order: Self Organization and Selection in Evolution, in the context of the emerging sciences of complexity. Origins, due out of Oxford University Press in early 1992, attempts to lay out a broadened theory of evolution based on the marriage of unexpected and powerful properties of self organization which arises in complex systems, properties which may underlie the origin of life itself and the emergence of order in ontogeny, and the continuing action of natural (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44. Stuart A. Kauffman (1987). Developmental Logic and its Evolution. Bioessays 6 (2):82-87.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  45. Evelyn Fox Keller (2005). DDS: Dynamics of Developmental Systems. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 20 (2-3):409-416.
    The acronym Developmental systems theory (DST) has been introduced into the literature on development in at least three different contexts in recent years – twice for DST, and before that, for Dynamical Systems Theory – and in all cases, to designate a new perspective for understanding development. Subtle but significant differences in argument and aims distinguish these uses, and confound the difficulty of saying just what DST is. My aim in this paper is to disambiguate these different terms – both (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  46. Evelyn Fox Keller (1999). Understanding Development. Biology and Philosophy 14 (3):321-330.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47. Catherine Kendig, An Ontogenetic-Ecological Conception of Species: A New Approach to an Old Idea. EPSA09: 2nd Conference of the European Philosophy of Science Association. Online at PhilSci Archive.
    This paper outlines an alternative perspective on species that avoids some of the underlying assumptions held by the BSC and other gene-centred species concepts. It begins with a characterisation of the species problem and some of the assumptions underpinning conceptions of species. In particular, the underlying bias of some conceptions (such as the BSC) to focus exclusively on the adult stage of the life cycle in articulating what a species is.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48. Irfan Khawaja (2007). Bioethics and the New Embryology: Springboards for Debate, by Scott F. Gilbert, Anna L. Tyler, and Emily J. Zackin. Teaching Philosophy 30 (2):220-223.
  49. Irfan Khawaja (2007). Bioethics and the New Embryology. Teaching Philosophy 30 (2):220-223.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  50. Jared J. Kinggard, Rethinking Ethical Naturalism: The Implications of Developmental Systems Theory.
    Biological research has the capacity to inform ethical discussions. There are numerous questions about the nature of sexual orientation, intelligence, gender identity, etc., and many of these questions are commonly approached with the benefit of implicit or explicit biological commitments. The answers to these sorts of questions can have a powerful impact on social, ethical, and political positions. In this project I examine the prospect of naturalizing ethics under the umbrella of developmental systems theory. If one is committed to DST, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 903