About this topic
Summary

Specific to papers included in Developmental Systems Theory (DST) is the belief that the study of development requires a systems-level model. Such a model would abstract away from the specific biological details of any particular developmental process in order to isolate the general properties of developing systems.  Contrasting with Developmental Modularity, DST maintains that identifying the function of individual developmental modules at the cellular and molecular levels is intractably complicated and is incapable of representing the structure found at the abstract systems-level, systems properties are emergent. However, reflecting an internal dispute, the systems studied are either individual developing organisms (expressing particular phenotypes) or systems of ecologically-coupled populations of developing organisms (as they co-evolve with each other).

  Show all references
Related categories
Siblings:
76 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Order:
1 — 50 / 76
  1. Gennaro Auletta (2011). Cognitive Biology: Dealing with Information From Bacteria to Minds. Oxford University Press, Usa.
    Machine generated contents note: -- 1. Quantum Mechanics as a General Framework -- 2. Classical and Quantum Information and Entropy -- 3. The Brain: An Outlook -- 4. Vision -- 5. Dealing with Target's Motion and Our Own Movement -- 6. Complexity: A Necessary Condition -- 7. General Features of Life -- 8. The Organism as a Semiotic and Cybernetic System -- 9. Phylogeny -- 10. Ontogeny -- 11. Epigeny -- 12. Representational Semiotics -- 13. The Brain as an Information-Control (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  2. Christopher J. Austin (2015). The Dispositional Genome: Primus Inter Pares. Biology and Philosophy 30 (2):227-246.
    According to the proponents of Developmental Systems Theory and the Causal Parity Thesis, the privileging of the genome as “first among equals” with respect to the development of phenotypic traits is more a reflection of our own heuristic prejudice than of ontology - the underlying causal structures responsible for that specified development no more single out the genome as primary than they do other broadly “environmental” factors. Parting with the methodology of the popular responses to the Thesis, this paper offers (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  3. F. Bailly, F. Gaill & R. Mosseri (1991). A Dynamical System for Biological Development: The Case of Caenorhabditis Elegans. Acta Biotheoretica 39 (3-4):167-184.
    We show how a simple nonlinear dynamical system (the discrete quadratic iteration on the unit segment) can be the basis for modelling the embryogenesis process. Such an approach, even though being crude, can nevertheless prove to be useful when looking with the two main involved processes:i) on one hand the cell proliferation under successive divisions ii) on the other hand, the differentiation between cell lineages. We illustrate this new approach in the case of Caenorhabditis elegans by looking at the early (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4. Majid Bani-Yaghoub & David E. Amundsen (2008). Study and Simulation of Reaction–Diffusion Systems Affected by Interacting Signaling Pathways. Acta Biotheoretica 56 (4):315-328.
    Possible effects of interaction (cross-talk) between signaling pathways is studied in a system of Reaction–Diffusion (RD) equations. Furthermore, the relevance of spontaneous neurite symmetry breaking and Turing instability has been examined through numerical simulations. The interaction between Retinoic Acid (RA) and Notch signaling pathways is considered as a perturbation to RD system of axon-forming potential for N2a neuroblastoma cells. The present work suggests that large increases to the level of RA–Notch interaction can possibly have substantial impacts on neurite outgrowth and (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5. Denis Barabé & Joachim Vieth (1979). Le Concept de Fusion En Morphologie Vegetale Chez Payer Et Chez Van Tieghem. Acta Biotheoretica 28 (3):204-216.
    The meaning of the concept of fusion is discussed in relation with the works of Payer and those of Van Tieghem. It is pointed out that there is a difference, at the theoretical level, between the concept of fusion congénitale as defined by Payer and the concept of concrescence congénitale formulated by Van Tieghem. The former is inobservable by definition, while the latter deals with intercalary growth. For Van Tieghem, anatomy can prove the existence of fusion, even if we do (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6. Anouk Barberousse (2010). The Role of Self-Organization in Developmental Systems Theory and the Neo-Darwinian, Theory of Evolution. Biological Theory 5 (3):202-205.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7. Anouk Barberousse, Francesca Merlin & Thomas Pradeu (2010). Introduction: Reassessing Developmental Systems Theory. Biological Theory 5 (3):199-201.
    The Developmental Systems Theory (DST) presented by its proponents as a challenging approach in biology is aimed at transforming the workings of the life sciences from both a theoretical and experimental point of view (see, in particular, Oyama [1985] 2000; Oyama et al. 2001). Even though some may have the impression that the enthusiasm surrounding DST has faded in very recent years, some of the key concepts, ideas, and visions of DST have in fact pervaded biology and philosophy of biology. (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8. Jonathan Bard (2010). A Systems Biology View of Evolutionary Genetics. Bioessays 32 (7):559-563.
  9. Jonathan Bard (1989). What's Next in Developmental Systems?Organogenesis of the Kidney. By L. Sax�N (1987). Cambridge University Press. Pp. 173. �25. [REVIEW] Bioessays 11 (2-3):76-77.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10. Gillian Barker (1993). Models of Biological Change: Implications of Three Cases of "Lamrckian" Change. In Perspectives in Ethology 10: Behavior and Evolution. 229-248.
  11. Martin Barker (1987). Susan Oyama, The Ontogeny of Information. Radical Philosophy 45:49.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12. Pierre-Alain Braillard (forthcoming). Systems Biology and the Mechanistic Framework. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  13. Ann Burlein (2005). The Productive Power of Ambiguity: Rethinking Homosexuality Through the Virtual and Developmental Systems Theory. Hypatia 20 (1):21-53.
    This paper juxtaposes Deleuze's notion of the virtual alongside Oyama's notion of a developmental system in order to explore the promises and perils of thinking bodily identity as indeterminate at a time when new technologies render bodily ambiguity increasingly productive of both economic profit and power relations.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14. Brett Calcott (2014). Engineering and Evolvability. Biology and Philosophy 29 (3):293-313.
    Comparing engineering to evolution typically involves adaptationist thinking, where well-designed artifacts are likened to well-adapted organisms, and the process of evolution is likened to the process of design. A quite different comparison is made when biologists focus on evolvability instead of adaptationism. Here, the idea is that complex integrated systems, whether evolved or engineered, share universal principles that affect the way they change over time. This shift from adaptationism to evolvability is a significant move for, as I argue, we can (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  15. Brett Calcott (2013). Why How and Why Aren't Enough: More Problems with Mayr's Proximate-Ultimate Distinction. Biology and Philosophy 28 (5):767-780.
    Like Laland et al., I think Mayr’s distinction is problematic, but I identify a further problem with it. I argue that Mayr’s distinction is a false dichotomy, and obscures an important question about evolutionary change. I show how this question, once revealed, sheds light on some debates in evo-devo that Laland et al.’s analysis cannot, and suggest that it provides a different view about how future integration between biological disciplines might proceed.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  16. Athel Cornish-Bowden (2006). Putting the Systems Back Into Systems Biology. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 49 (4):475-489.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  17. Kim J. Dale & Olivier Pourquié (2000). A Clock‐Work Somite. Bioessays 22 (1):72-83.
    Somites are transient structures which represent the most overt segmental feature of the vertebrate embryo. The strict temporal regulation of somitogenesis is of critical developmental importance since many segmental structures adopt a periodicity based on that of the somites. Until recently, the mechanisms underlying the periodicity of somitogenesis were largely unknown. Based on the oscillations of c-hairy1 and lunatic fringe RNA, we now have evidence for an intrinsic segmentation clock in presomitic cells. Translation of this temporal periodicity into a spatial (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  18. Jamie A. Davies (2002). Do Different Branching Epithelia Use a Conserved Developmental Mechanism? Bioessays 24 (10):937-948.
  19. G. R. de Beer (1930). Embryology and Evolution. Journal of Philosophical Studies 5 (19):482-484.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  20. Jose F. de Celis (2003). Pattern Formation in the Drosophila Wing: The Development of the Veins. Bioessays 25 (5):443-451.
  21. Arnold De Loof (1992). Problems and Paradigms. All Animals Develop From a Blastula: Consequences of an Undervalued Definition for Thinking on Development. Bioessays 14 (8):573-575.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22. François Delaportex (1983). Theories of Osteogenesis in the Eighteenth Century. Journal of the History of Biology 16 (3):343 - 360.
  23. Chao Deng (2005). Interactions Between Genetic and Environmental Factors Determine Direction of Population Lateralization. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (4):598-598.
    Direction of the embyro's head rotation is determined by asymmetrical expression of several genes (such as shh, Nodal, lefty, and FGF8) in Hensen's node. This genetically determined head-turning bias provides a base for light-aligned population lateralization in chicks, in which the direction of the lateralization is determined by genetic factors and the degree of the lateralization is determined by environmental factors.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24. Herman Denis (1994). A Parallel Between Development and Evolution: Germ Cell Recruitment by the Gonads. Bioessays 16 (12):933-938.
  25. Guy Dove (2012). Grammar as a Developmental Phenomenon. Biology and Philosophy 27 (5):615-637.
    More and more researchers are examining grammar acquisition from theoretical perspectives that treat it as an emergent phenomenon. In this essay, I argue that a robustly developmental perspective provides a potential explanation for some of the well-known crosslinguistic features of early child language: the process of acquisition is shaped in part by the developmental constraints embodied in von Baer’s law of development. An established model of development, the Developmental Lock, captures and elucidates the probabilistic generalizations at the heart of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  26. Gabriel Dover (2000). How Genomic and Developmental Dynamics Affect Evolutionary Processes. Bioessays 22 (12):1153-1159.
  27. Denis Duboule (1992). The Vertebrate Limb: A Model System to Study the Hox/Hom Gene Network During Development and Evolution. Bioessays 14 (6):375-384.
  28. F. Duchesneau (1985). Embryology in the 18th Century: S. Roe's Interpretation]. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 7 (2).
  29. John Dupr (2012). Processes of Life: Essays in the Philosophy of Biology. OUP Oxford.
    John Dupr explores recent revolutionary developments in biology and considers their relevance for our understanding of human nature and society. He reveals how the advance of genetic science is changing our view of the constituents of life, and shows how an understanding of microbiology will overturn standard assumptions about the living world.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   9 citations  
  30. John Dupré (2010). Developmental Systems Theory. The Philosophers' Magazine (50):38-39.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31. L. R. Franklin-Hall (2015). Explaining Causal Selection with Explanatory Causal Economy: Biology and Beyond. In P.-A. Braillard & C. Malaterre (eds.), Explanation in Biology: An Enquiry into the Diversity of Explanatory Patterns in the Life Sciences. Springer 413-438.
    Among the factors necessary for the occurrence of some event, which of these are selectively highlighted in its explanation and labeled as causes — and which are explanatorily omitted, or relegated to the status of background conditions? Following J. S. Mill, most have thought that only a pragmatic answer to this question was possible. In this paper I suggest we understand this ‘causal selection problem’ in causal-explanatory terms, and propose that explanatory trade-offs between abstraction and stability can provide a principled (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  32. Giuseppe Fusco (2001). How Many Processes Are Responsible for Phenotypic Evolution? Evolution & Development 3 (4):279-286.
    In addressing phenotypic evolution, this article reconsiders natural selection, random drift, developmental constraints, and internal selection in the new extended context of evolutionary developmental biology. The change of perspective from the "evolution of phenotypes" toward an "evolution of ontogenies" (evo-devo perspective) affects the reciprocal relationships among these different processes. Random drift and natural selection are sibling processes: two forms of post-productional sorting among alternative developmental trajectories, the former random, the latter nonrandom. Developmental constraint is a compound concept; it contains even (...)
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33. Philippe Gagnon (2009). Les Limites du Vivant Sont-Elles Riches D’Une Leçon? Contribution À L’Étude du Déterminisme Morphique. Eikasia. Revista de Filosofía 27 (August):155-186.
    Freedom is first apprehended as the pursuit of an activity which implies the choice to defend a thesis among other possible ones. This translation of the problem of freedom in an articulate language presupposes a complex nervous system and sensory apparatuses which we take for granted. In this study, I try to explore the undergrounds of the problem of freedom along with the suggestion that the notion of coding could enable one to bridge nature and the mind. When organisms invent, (...)
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34. Alfred Gierer (2012). The Hydra Model - a Model for What? International Journal of Developmental Biology 56:437-445.
    The introductory personal remarks refer to my motivations for choosing research projects, and for moving from physics to molecular biology and then to development, with Hydra as a model system. Historically, Trembley’s discovery of Hydra regeneration in 1744 was the begin¬ning of developmental biology as we understand it, with passionate debates about preformation versus de novo generation, mechanisms versus organisms. In fact, seemingly conflicting bottom-up and top-down concepts are both required in combination to understand development. In modern terms, this means (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35. Alfred Gierer (1981). Generation of Biological Patterns and Form: Some Physical, Mathematical and Logical Aspects. Progress in Biophysics and Molecular Biology 37 (1):1-48.
    While many different mechanisms contribute to the generation of spatial order in biological development, the formation of morphogenetic fields which in turn direct cell responses giving rise to pattern and form are of major importance and essential for embryogenesis and regeneration. Most likely the fields represent concentration patterns of substances produced by molecular kinetics. Short range autocatalytic activation in conjunction with longer range “lateral” inhibition or depletion effects is capable of generating such patterns (Gierer and Meinhardt, 1972). Non-linear reactions are (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  36. Alfred Gierer, S. Berking, H. Bode, C. N. David, K. Flick, G. Hansmann, H. Schaller & E. Trenkner (1972). Regeneration of Hydra From Aggregated Cells. Nature New Biology 239:98-101.
    • Aggregates of previously isolated cells of Hydra are capable, under suitable solvant conditions, of regeneration forming complete animals. In a first stage, ecto- and endodermal cells sort out, producing the bilayered hollow structure characteristic of Hydra tissue; thereafter, heads are formed (even if the original cell preparation contained no head cells), eventually leading to the separation of normal animals with head, body column and foot. Hydra appears to be the highest type of organism that allows for regeneration of the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37. Alfred Gierer & Hans Meinhardt (1972). A Theory of Biological Pattern Formation. Kybernetik, Continued as Biological Cybernetics 12 (1):30 - 39.
    The paper addresses the formation of striking patterns within originally near-homogenous tissue, the process prototypical for embryology, and represented in particularly purist form by cut sections of hydra regenerating, by internal reorganisation of the pre-existing tissue, a complete animal with head and foot. The essential requirements are autocatalytic, self-enhancing activation, combined with inhibitory or depletion effects of wider range – “lateral inhibition”. Not only de-novo-pattern formation, but also well known, striking features of developmental regulation such as induction, inhibition, and proportion (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   11 citations  
  38. Peter Godfrey-Smith (2000). Philosophy of Biology, Psychology, and Neuroscience-The Developmental Systems Perspective in the Philosophy of Biology-Explanatory Symmetries, Preformation, and Developmental Systems Theory. Philosophy of Science 67 (3).
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  39. Peter Godfrey-Smith (2000). Explanatory Symmetries, Preformation, and Developmental Systems Theory. Philosophy of Science 67 (3):331.
    Some central ideas associated with developmental systems theory (DST) are outlined for non-specialists. These ideas concern the nature of biological development, the alleged distinction between "genetic" and "environmental" traits, the relations between organism and environment, and evolutionary processes. I also discuss some criticisms of the DST approach.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  40. Peter Godfrey-Smith & Susan Oyama (2000). Philosophy of Biology, Psychology, and Neuroscience-The Developmental Systems Perspective in the Philosophy of Biology-Causal Democracy and Causal Contributions in Developmental Systems Theory. Philosophy of Science 67 (3).
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41. Juan-Carlos Gómez (2005). Developmental Interplay Between Number Systems. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 9 (3):118-125.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42. P. E. Griffiths & R. D. Gray (1994). Developmental Systems and Evolutionary Explanation. Journal of Philosophy 91 (6):277-304.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   79 citations  
  43. Paul E. Griffiths & Russell D. Gray (2005). Discussion: Three Ways to Misunderstand Developmental Systems Theory. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 20 (2-3):417-425.
    Developmental systems theory (DST) is a general theoretical perspective on development, heredity and evolution. It is intended to facilitate the study of interactions between the many factors that influence development without reviving `dichotomous' debates over nature or nurture, gene or environment, biology or culture. Several recent papers have addressed the relationship between DST and the thriving new discipline of evolutionary developmental biology (EDB). The contributions to this literature by evolutionary developmental biologists contain three important misunderstandings of DST.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   15 citations  
  44. Paul E. Griffiths & Russell D. Gray (1997). Replicator II – Judgement Day. Biology and Philosophy 12 (4):471-492.
    The Developmental Systems approach to evolution is defended against the alternative extended replicator approach of Sterelny, Smith and Dickison (1996). A precise definition is provided of the spatial and temporal boundaries of the life-cycle that DST claims is the unit of evolution. Pacé Sterelny et al., the extended replicator theory is not a bulwark against excessive holism. Everything which DST claims is replicated in evolution can be shown to be an extended replicator on Sterelny et al.s definition. Reasons are given (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   15 citations  
  45. Paul E. Griffiths & James G. Tabery (2013). Developmental Systems Theory: What Does It Explain, and How Does It Explain It? In Richard M. Lerner & Janette B. Benson (eds.), Embodiment and Epigenesis: Theoretical and Methodological Issues in Understanding the Role of Biology Within the Relational Developmental System Part A: Philosophical, Theoretical, and Biological Dimensions. Elsevier 65--94.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46. Paul Griffiths & Adam Hochman (2015). Developmental Systems Theory. eLS:1-7.
    Developmental systems theory (DST) is a wholeheartedly epigenetic approach to development, inheritance and evolution. The developmental system of an organism is the entire matrix of resources that are needed to reproduce the life cycle. The range of developmental resources that are properly described as being inherited, and which are subject to natural selection, is far wider than has traditionally been allowed. Evolution acts on this extended set of developmental resources. From a developmental systems perspective, development does not proceed (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47. Andrew L. Hamilton (2009). Toward a Mechanistic Evo Devo. In Manfred Laubichler & Jane Maienschein (eds.), Form and Function in Developmental Evolution. Cambridge University Press 213.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48. Adam Hochman (2013). The Phylogeny Fallacy and the Ontogeny Fallacy. Biology and Philosophy 28 (4):593-612.
    In 1990 Robert Lickliter and Thomas Berry identified the phylogeny fallacy, an empirically untenable dichotomy between proximate and evolutionary causation, which locates proximate causes in the decoding of ‘ genetic programs’, and evolutionary causes in the historical events that shaped these programs. More recently, Lickliter and Hunter Honeycutt argued that Evolutionary Psychologists commit this fallacy, and they proposed an alternative research program for evolutionary psychology. For these authors the phylogeny fallacy is the proximate/evolutionary distinction itself, which they argue constitutes a (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  49. Eva Jablonka & Marion Lamb (2002). Creating Bridges or Rifts? Developmental Systems Theory and Evolutionary Developmental Biology. Bioessays 24 (3):290-291.
  50. Jonathan Kaplan (2008). Evolutionary Innovations and Developmental Resources: From Stability to Variation and Back Again. Philosophy of Science 75 (5):861-873.
    Will a synthesis of developmental and evolutionary biology require a focus on the role of nongenetic resources in evolution? Nongenetic variation may exist but be hidden because the phenotypes are stable (developmentally canalized) under certain background conditions. In this case, those differences may come to play important roles in evolution when background conditions change. If this is so, then a focus on the way that developmental resources are made reliable, and the ways in which reliability fails, may prove to be (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
1 — 50 / 76