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Subcategories:History/traditions: Disability
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  1. Jennifer Clegg & Richard Lansdall-Welfare (2003). Death, Disability, and Dogma. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 10 (1):67-79.
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  2. Melinda Hall (2013). Vile Sovereigns in Bioethical Debate. Disability Studies Quarterly 33 (4).
    In this paper, I critically assess transhumanist philosophy and its influence in bioethics by turning to resources in the work of Michel Foucault. I begin by outlining transhumanism and drawing out some of the primary goals of transhumanist philosophy. In order to do so, I focus on the work of Nick Bostrom and Julian Savulescu, two prominent contributors to this thinking. I then move to explicate Foucault’s work, in the early iterations of the Abnormal lecture series, on the concept of (...)
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  3. Melinda C. Hall (2014). Picturing Disability: Beggar, Freak, Citizen, and Other Photographic Rhetoric. [REVIEW] Journal of Literary and Cultural Disability Studies 8 (1):121-124.
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  4. Peter W. Halligan (2006). Awareness and Knowing: Implications for Rehabilitation. Neuropsychological Rehabilitation 16 (4):456-473.
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  5. Peter W. Halligan & John C. Marshall (1998). Neglect of Awareness. Consciousness and Cognition 7 (3):356-380.
    We describe some of the signs and symptoms of left visuo-spatial neglect. This common, severe and often long-lasting impairment is the most striking consequence of right hemisphere brain damage. Patients seem to (over-)attend to the right with subsequent inability to respond to stimuli in contralesional space. We draw particular attention to how patients themselves experience neglect. Furthermore, we show that the neglect patient's loss of awareness of left space is crucial to an understanding of the condition. Even after left space (...)
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  6. Andy Hamilton (2006). Mild Cognitive Impairment: Which Kind Is It? Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 13 (1):51-52.
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  7. Jessica Hammond (2010). Genetic Engineering to Avoid Genetic Neglect: From Chance to Responsibility. Bioethics 24 (4):160-169.
    Currently our assessment of whether someone is a good parent depends on the environmental inputs (or lack of such inputs) they give their children. But new genetic intervention technologies, to which we may soon have access, mean that how good a parent is will depend also on the genetic inputs they give their children. Each new piece of available technology threatens to open up another way that we can neglect our children. Our obligations to our children and our susceptibilities to (...)
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  8. J. Harris (2002). One Principle and a Fourth Fallacy of Disability Studies. Journal of Medical Ethics 28 (3):204-204.
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  9. J. Harris (2001). One Principle and Three Fallacies of Disability Studies. Journal of Medical Ethics 27 (6):383-387.
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  10. J. Harris (2000). Is There a Coherent Social Conception of Disability? Journal of Medical Ethics 26 (2):95-100.
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  11. J. Harris (1981). Ethical Problems in the Management of Some Severely Handicapped Children. Journal of Medical Ethics 7 (3):117-124.
    This paper examines some of the arguments advanced and acted upon by doctors concerned in decisions about whether severely handicapped patients should live or die. It criticises the view that 'selective treatment' is morally preferable to infanticide and shows how the standard arguments advanced for this preference fail to sustain it. It argues that the self-deception, which is sometimes cited as a sign of humanity in these cases, and which is implicit in the term 'selective treatment' is more dangerous than (...)
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  12. Gerald K. Harrison & Julia Tanner (2011). Better Not to Have Children. Think, 10(27), 113-121 (27):113-121.
    Most people take it for granted that it's morally permissible to have children. They may raise questions about the number of children it's responsible to have or whether it's permissible to reproduce when there's a strong risk of serious disability. But in general, having children is considered a good thing to do, something that's morally permissible in most cases (perhaps even obligatory).
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  13. Tessa Hart, John Whyte, Junghoon Kim & Monica Vaccaro (2005). Executive Function and Self-Awareness of "Real-World" Behavior and Attention Deficits Following Traumatic Brain Injury. Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation. Special Issue 20 (4):333-347.
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  14. Christie Hartley (2011). Disability and Justice. Philosophy Compass 6 (2):120-132.
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  15. Christie Hartley (2009). Justice for the Disabled: A Contractualist Approach. Journal of Social Philosophy 40 (1):17-36.
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  16. S. Hauerwas (1993). Book Review : A Gentle Touch: From a Theology of Handicap to a Theology of Human Being, by David Pailin. London, SPCK, 1992. 196pp. 12.50. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 6 (2):99-100.
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  17. M. Hayry (2004). There is a Difference Between Selecting a Deaf Embryo and Deafening a Hearing Child. Journal of Medical Ethics 30 (5):510-512.
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  18. Christopher Heginbotham (2008). A Third Way: Social Disability and Person-Centered Assessment. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 15 (1):31-33.
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  19. David R. Hemsley (2003). Schizophrenic Cognition: Taken Out of Context? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (1):91-91.
    This commentary addresses: (a) the problems of definition which have been prominent in the use of the term context in schizophrenia research; (b) potentially useful distinctions and links with other theories of schizophrenic cognition; and (c) possible pathways to schizophrenic symptoms. It is suggested that at least two major aspects of the operation of context may be distinguished and that both may be impaired in schizophrenia.
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  20. Peter Herissone-Kelly (2003). Bioethics in the United Kingdom: Genetic Screening, Disability Rights, and the Erosion of Trust. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 12 (03):235-241.
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  21. D. Micah Hester (2001). What to Do About the Mere Potential for Disabilities. American Journal of Bioethics 1 (3):1 – 2.
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  22. R. Higgs (1983). Making Up Her Mind: Consent, Pregnancy and Mental Handicap. Journal of Medical Ethics 9 (4):219-226.
    The following case was presented by a trainee general practitioner, working in inner London, to her release course for discussion. It is told, as it was presented, in the immediate aftermath of the events described. The names and some of the details have been altered.
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  23. Walter M. High, Angelle M. Sander, Margaret A. Struchen & Karen A. Hart (eds.) (2005). Rehabilitation for Traumatic Brain Injury. Oxford University Press.
    Rehabilitation For Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) is a state-of-the-science review of the effectiveness of rehabilitation interventions.
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  24. D. J. Hill (1987). On Sterilising Severely Mentally Handicapped People. Journal of Medical Ethics 13 (4):222-222.
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  25. Anita Ho (2008). The Individualist Model of Autonomy and the Challenge of Disability. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 5 (2/3):193-207.
    In recent decades, the intertwining ideas of self-determination and well-being have received tremendous support in bioethics. Discussions regarding self-determination, or autonomy, often focus on two dimensions—the capacity of the patient and the freedom from external coercion. The practice of obtaining informed consent, for example, has become a standard procedure in therapeutic and research medicine. On the surface, it appears that patients now have more opportunities to exercise their self-determination than ever. Nonetheless, discussions of patient autonomy in the bioethics literature, which (...)
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  26. Janell Hobson (2003). The "Batty" Politic: Toward an Aesthetics of the Black Female Body. Hypatia 18 (4):87-105.
    : I assess representations of black women's derrières, which are often depicted as grotesque, despite attempts by some black women artists to create a black feminist aesthetic that recognizes the black female body as beautiful and desirable. Utilizing a black feminist disability theory, I revisit the history of the Hottentot Venus, which contributed to the shaping of this representational trope, and I identify a recurring struggle among these artists to recover the "unmirrored" black female body.
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  27. Christoph Hoerl (2001). Introduction: Understanding, Explaining, and Intersubjectivity in Schizophrenia. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 8 (2-3):83-88.
    This article provides an introduction to a special issue of the journal Philosophy, Psychiatry and Psychology, On Understanding and Explaining Schizophrenia. The article identifies a common thread running through the different contributions to this special issue, inspired by Jaspers's (1963) suggestion that a profound impairment in the ability to engage in interpersonal and social relations is a key factor in psychiatric disorders. It is argued that this suggestion can help solve a central dilemma in psychopathology, which is to make intelligible (...)
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  28. Alan Holland (1998). Genetically Based Handicap. Journal of Applied Philosophy 15 (2):119–132.
    It is unclear what we should make of a policy designed to eradicate' genetically based handicap, and in particular whether it constitutes discrimination against people with a genetic handicap. After brief reference to the legal position, four arguments are examined which purport to justify differential treatment of handicapped lives either before conception or before birth: the argument from genetic error', the argument from parental responsibility, the argument from social consequences and the argument from impersonal harm. Weaknesses are detected in each (...)
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  29. M. Morgan Holmes (2008). Mind the Gaps: Intersex and (Re-Productive) Spaces in Disability Studies and Bioethics. [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 5 (2/3):169-181.
    With a few notable exceptions disability studies has not taken account of intersexuality, and it is principally through the lenses of feminist and queer-theory oriented ethical discussions but not through ‘straight’ bioethics that modes valuing intersex difference have been proposed. Meanwhile, the medical presupposition that intersex characteristics are inherently disabling to social viability remains the taken-for-granted truth from which clinical practice proceeds. In this paper I argue against bioethical perspectives that justify extensive and invasive pre- and post-natal medical interference to (...)
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  30. Jules Holroyd (forthcoming). Clarifying Capacity: Reasons and Value. In Lubomira Radoilska (ed.), Autonomy and Mental Health. Oxford University Press.
    It is usually appropriate for adults to make significant decisions, such as about what kinds of medical treatment to undergo, for themselves. But sometimes impairments are suffered - either temporary or permanent - which render an individual unable to make such decisions. The Mental Capacity Act 2005 sets out the conditions under which it is appropriate to regard an individual as lacking the capacity to make a particular decision (and when provisions should be made for a decision on their behalf). (...)
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  31. James F. Holzer (1978). Section 504 Challenges Hospitals'Care of the Deaf. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 6 (3):6-7.
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  32. Jon C. Horvitz (2002). Dopamine, Parkinson's Disease, and Volition. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (5):586-586.
    Disruptions in dopamine transmission within the basal ganglia (BG) produce deficits in voluntary actions, that is, in the interface between cortically-generated goal representation and BG-mediated response selection. Under conditions of dopamine loss in humans and other animals, responses are impaired when they require internal generation, but are relatively intact when elicited by external stimuli.
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  33. Gavin W. Hougham (2005). Waste Not, Want Not: Cognitive Impairment Should Not Preclude Research Participation. American Journal of Bioethics 5 (1):36 – 37.
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  34. Julian C. Hughes (2006). Introduction: The Heat of Mild Cognitive Impairment. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 13 (1):1-2.
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  35. J. M. Hull (2003). A Spirituality of Disability: The Christian Heritage as Both Problem and Potential. Studies in Christian Ethics 16 (2):21-35.
    The image of God in the Bible is a projection of the normal human, raised to the highest degree. This excludes the human body which is different. Knowledge itself is based in bodily experience, and a starting place for a theology of disability may be found in the phenomenology of different bodies. When philosophers and theologians use the image of the face of God, this hegemony of the average is particularly noticeable. Blind people are only one of a number of (...)
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  36. Kent Hull (1980). Fourth Circuit Limits �504 Employment Rights of the Handicapped. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 8 (3):8-9.
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  37. Kent Hull (1980). Limiting Davis: Educating Handicapped People for Health Care Professions. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 8 (1):12-13.
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  38. Richard Hull (1998). Defining Disability—a Philosophical Approach. Res Publica 4 (2):199-210.
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  39. Richard J. Hull (2006). Cheap Listening? – Reflections on the Concept of Wrongful Disability. Bioethics 20 (2):55–63.
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  40. Glyn W. Humphreys & Emer M. E. Forde (2001). Hierarchies, Similarity, and Interactivity in Object Recognition: “Category-Specific” Neuropsychological Deficits. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (3):453-476.
    Category-specific impairments of object recognition and naming are among the most intriguing disorders in neuropsychology, affecting the retrieval of knowledge about either living or nonliving things. They can give us insight into the nature of our representations of objects: Have we evolved different neural systems for recognizing different categories of object? What kinds of knowledge are important for recognizing particular objects? How does visual similarity within a category influence object recognition and representation? What is the nature of our semantic (...)
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  41. Yeshayahu Hutzler (2008). Ethical Considerations in Adapted Physical Activity Practices. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 2 (2):158 – 171.
    This article focuses on ethical concerns about modifying physical activities within a variety of education, recreation, rehabilitation and competition contexts. An ecological frame of reference common within current educational and rehabilitation theories is utilised for reflecting upon adapted physical activity practices. Ethical principles challenged in the article are (a) the utilitarian consequence to all participants; (b) professional paternalism; and (c) empowerment of individuals with a disability. Concerns arising with respect to these ethical principles in adapted physical activity practices are discussed (...)
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  42. Shelley R. Jackson, Gayle Hafner, Daniel O.?Brien & Georges Benjamin (2003). Approaches to Implementing the Olmstead ADA (Americans with Disabilities Act) Ruling. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 31 (s4):47-48.
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  43. Bette Jacobs, Jason Roffenbender, Jeff Collmann, Kate Cherry, LeManuel Lee Bitsói, Kim Bassett & Charles H. Evans (2010). Bridging the Divide Between Genomic Science and Indigenous Peoples. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 38 (3):684-696.
    The new science of genomics endeavors to chart the genomes of individuals around the world, with the dual goals of understanding the role genetic factors play in human health and solving problems of disease and disability. From the perspective of indigenous peoples and developing countries, the promises and perils of genomic science appear against a backdrop of global health disparity and political vulnerability. These conditions pose a dilemma for many communities when attempting to decide about participating in genomic research or (...)
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  44. Jonathan Jacobs (1998). Taking Ethical Disability Seriously. Ratio 11 (2):141–158.
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  45. Caroline Jagoe & Ruth Roseingrave (2011). “If This is What I'm 'Meant to Be'…”: The Journeys of Students Participating in a Conversation Partner Scheme for People with Aphasia. [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 9 (2):127-148.
    The development of speech language therapy students into clinicians is an area of increasing interest as educators focus on how knowledge, skills and attitudes are taught and learnt within the profession. The personal journeys of students through experiences of service learning have potential to further our understanding of the impact of civic engagement on the student experience and their learning. This paper explores the journeys of first year speech and language therapy students through a Thematic Analysis of reflective letters written (...)
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  46. Christine James (2008). Philosophy of Disability. Essays in Philosophy 9 (1):1-10.
    Disability has been a topic of heightened philosophical interest in the last 30 years. Disability theory has enriched a broad range of sub-specializations in philosophy. The call for papers for this issue welcomed papers addressing questions on normalcy, medical ethics, public health, philosophy of education, aesthetics, philosophy of sport, philosophy of religion, and theories of knowledge. This issue of Essays in Philosophy includes nine essays that approach the philosophy of disability in three distinct ways: The first set of three essays (...)
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  47. William James (1892). Thought Before Language: A Deaf-Mute's Recollections. Philosophical Review 1 (6):613-624.
  48. William James (1881). Sense of Dizziness in Deaf-Mutes. Mind (23):412-413.
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  49. Daniel C. Javitt (2003). Peeling the Onion: NMDA Dysfunction as a Unifying Model in Schizophrenia. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (1):93-94.
    N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) dysfunction plays a crucial role in schizophrenia, leading to impairments in cognitive coordination. NMDAR agonists (e.g., glycine) ameliorate negative and cognitive symptoms, consistent with NMDAR models. However, not all types of cognitive coordination use NMDAR. Further, not all aspects of cognitive coordination are impaired in schizophrenia, suggesting the need for specificity in applying the cognitive coordination construct.
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  50. A. Jaworska (2002). Philosophical and Ethical Problems in Mental Handicap. Philosophical Review 111 (2):270-275.
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