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  1. Vuko Andric & Attila Tanyi (forthcoming). God and Eternal Boredom. Religious Studies:1-20.
    God is thought to be eternal. Does this mean that he is timeless? Or is he, rather, omnitemporal? In this paper we want to show that God cannot be omnitemporal. Our starting point, which we take from Bernard Williams’ article on the Makropulos Case, is the intuition that it is inappropriate for persons not to become bored after a sufficiently long sequence of time has passed. If God were omnitemporal, he would suffer from boredom. But God is the greatest possible (...)
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  2. Michael Brodrick (2012). The Importance of God as an Idea. Overheard in Seville 30 (30):14-18.
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  3. Andrei Buckareff, The Ontology of Action and Divine Agency (Do Not Cite Without Permission).
    The concept of divine agency is central to the narrative traditions inherited by Jews, Christians, and Muslims. The scriptures of the Abrahamic religions include repeated references to the intentional actions and intentional outcomes of the actions of God. For instance, in the “Song of Moses” (Exodus 15:1-18), Moses celebrates the freedom of the Hebrews from bondage, declaring that Yahweh is “awesome in splendor, doing wonders” (5:11 NRSV). Alongside the picture of God as an agent who performs actions is a conception (...)
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  4. James M. Byrne (2009). Theological Methodology, Classical Theism, and "Lived Time" in Antje Jackelén's Time and Eternity. Zygon 44 (4):951-964.
    Antje Jackelén's Time and Eternity successfully employs the method of correlation and a close study of the question of time to enter the dialogue between science and theology. Hermeneutical attention to language is a central element of this dialogue, but we must be aware that much science is untranslatable into ordinary language; it is when we get to the bigger metaphysical assumptions of science that true dialogue begins to happen. Thus, although the method of correlation is a useful way to (...)
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  5. Ismail Cetin (2009). Some Reflections on the Concept of 'Timeless God' in Western Thought. Kaygi 12:225 - 234.
    Anyone who is interested in the question of the existence of God has to study first of all the divine attributes; for to say that God exists is to say that there is something that has some attributes. If ’God exists’ is to be true, then the divine attributes must at least themselves be coherent and compatible. The coherence of the notion of God with His traditional divine attributes is a necessary, though not sufficient, condition for the acceptance of God’s (...)
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  6. Adam Co (1999). On the Relation of God and Time: A Temporalist Rebuttal of an Atemporalist View of Divine Immutability. Quodlibet 1.
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  7. William L. Craig (1996). Timelessness and Creation. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 74 (4):646 – 656.
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  8. William Lane Craig (2000). Omniscience, Tensed Facts and Divine Eternity. Faith and Philosophy 17 (2):227--228.
    A difficulty for a view of divine eternity as timelessness is that if time is tensed, then God, in virtue of His omniscience, must know tensed facts. But tensed facts, such as It is now t, can only be known by a temporally located being.Defenders of divine atemporality may attempt to escape the force of this argument by contending either that a timeless being can know tensed facts or else that ignorance of tensed facts is compatible with divine omniscience. Kvanvig, (...)
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  9. William Lane Craig (2000). Timelessness and Omnitemporality. Philosophia Christi 2:33.
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  10. William Lane Craig (1998). On the Alleged Metaphysical Superiority of Timelessness. Sophia 37 (1):1-9.
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  11. William Lane Craig (1998). Divine Timelessness and Personhood. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 43 (2):109-124.
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  12. William Lane Craig (1997). On the Argument for Divine Timelessness From the Incompleteness of Temporal Life. Heythrop Journal 38 (2):165–171.
    A promising argument for divine timelessness is that temporal life is possessed only moment by moment, which is incompatible with the existence of a perfect being.Since the argument is based on the experience of time’s passage, it cannot be circumvented by appeal to a tenseless theory of time.Neither can the argument be subverted by appeals to a temporal deity’s possession of a specious present of infinite duration.Nonetheless, because the argument concerns one’s experience of time’s passage rather than the objective reality (...)
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  13. William Lane Craig (1997). Talbot School of Theology Divine Timelessness and Necessary Existence. International Philosophical Quarterly 37 (2):217-224.
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  14. William Lane Craig (1997). Divine Timelessness and Necessary Existence. International Philosophical Quarterly 37:217-224.
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  15. Garrett J. DeWeese (2007). God and the Nature of Time. Philosophical Explorations 7:1566-5399.
    The past six decades have seen rising interest in the philosophy of time, driven in large measure by the metaphysical implications of the physical theories of relativity and quantum mechanics. Philosophical theology has only recently begun serious interaction with contemporary metaphysics of time. In particular, the issue of God's temporal mode of being has come under investigation In Part 1, I begin with the metaphysics of time, explicating and defending a causal account of dynamic time. I then consider objections that (...)
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  16. Douglas K. Erlandson (1978). Timelessness, Immutability, and Eschatology. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 9 (3):129 - 145.
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  17. Thomas P. Flint (1990). Hasker's God, Time, and Knowledge. Philosophical Studies 60 (1-2):103 - 115.
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  18. Gregory Ganssle (1993). Atemporality and the Mode of Divine Knowledge. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 34 (3):171 - 180.
    In this project, I explore and defend William Alston's claim that God does not have beliefs. Rather, He knows what He knows by direct intuition of facts. This direct intuition is absolute immediate awareness. It is immediate in that God knows what He knows without the mediation of other objects of knowledge. It is absolute in that His knowledge is not mediated by any other factors such as causal links between the object of knowledge and God's consciousness of it. ;My (...)
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  19. Gregory E. Ganssle, God and Time. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion.
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  20. Benedikt Paul Göcke (2012). Panentheism and Classical Theism. Sophia 52 (1):61-75.
    Panentheism seems to be an attractive alternative to classical theism. It is not clear, though, what exactly panentheism asserts and how it relates to classical theism. By way of clarifying the thesis of panentheism, I argue that panentheism and classical theism differ only as regards the modal status of the world. According to panentheism, the world is an intrinsic property of God – necessarily there is a world – and according to classical theism the world is an extrinsic property of (...)
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  21. Benedikt Paul Göcke, Matthias Hoesch & Peter Rohs (2008). How to Heckle Swinburne on God and Time. In Nicola Mößner, Sebastian Schmoranzer & Christian Weidemann (eds.), Richard Swinburne. Christian Philosophy in a Modern World. Ontos
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  22. James Goetz (2016). Semiclassical Theism and the Passage of Planck Times. Theology and Science 14 (3).
    This paper models God and time in the framework of modern physics. God bridges and simultaneously exists in (1) a universe with infinite tenseless time and (2) a created parallel universe with tensed time and a point origin. The primary attributes of God are inexhaustible love, inexhaustible perception, and inexhaustible force. The model also incorporates modern physics theories that include relativity, the conservation of energy, quantum mechanics, and multiverse geometry. For example, creation out of nothing and divine intervention are subject (...)
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  23. William Hasker (1989). God, Time and Knowledge. Ithaca: Cornell University Press.
    ... or engenders a tradition of philosophical reflection, questions will arise about the relation between divine knowledge and power and human freedom. ...
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  24. Paul Helm (2010). Eternal God: A Study of God Without Time. OUP Oxford.
    Paul Helm presents a new, expanded edition of his much praised 1988 book Eternal God , which defends the view that God exists in timeless eternity. Helm argues that divine timelessness is grounded in the idea of God as creator, and that this alone makes possible a proper account of divine omniscience.
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  25. Paul Helm (1975). Timelessness and Foreknowledge. Mind 84 (336):516-527.
  26. John Hick (1971). God and Timelessness. Philosophical Books 12 (1):19-21.
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  27. Jonathan Hill (2012). Incarnation, Timelessness, and Exaltation. Faith and Philosophy 29 (1):3-29.
    Christian tradition holds not simply that, in Christ, God became human, but that at the end of his earthly career Christ became exalted (possessing andexercising the divine attributes such as omnipotence and omniscience), and yet remained perpetually human. In this paper I consider several models ofthe incarnation in the light of these requirements. In particular, I contrast models that adopt a temporalist understanding of divine eternity with those that adopt an atemporalist one. I conclude that temporalist models struggle to accommodate (...)
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  28. Harold Chad Hillier (2005). Al-Ghazālī's Argument for the Eternity of the World in Tahāfut Al-Falāsifa (Discussion One, Proofs 1 and 2a) and the Problem of Divine Immutability and Timelessness. [REVIEW] Journal of Islamic Philosophy 1 (1):62-84.
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  29. Christoph Jäger (2013). Molinism and Theological Compatibilism. European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 5:71-92.
    In a series of recent papers John Martin Fischer argues that the Molinist solution to the problem of reconciling divine omniscience with human freedom does not offer such a solution at all. Instead, he maintains, Molina simply presupposes theological compatibilism. However, Fischer construes the problem in terms of sempiternalist omniscience, whereas classical Molinism adopts atemporalism. I argue that, moreover, an atemporalist reformulation of Fischer’s argument designed to show that Molinism is not even consistent is unsuccessful as well, since it employs (...)
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  30. E. J. Khamara (1974). Eternity and Omniscience. Philosophical Quarterly 24 (96):204-219.
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  31. Jonathan Kvanvig, Omniscience and Eternity: A Reply to Craig Jonathan L. Kvanvig.
    Craig claims that my treatment of temporal indexicals such as ‘now’ is inadequate, and that my theory gives no general account of tense. Craig’s argument misunderstands the theory of indexicals I give, and I show how to extend the theory to give a general account of tense.
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  32. William Lane Craig (1997). On the Argument for Divine Timelessness From the Incompleteness of Temporal Life. Heythrop Journal 38 (2):165-171.
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  33. Brian Leftow (2004). Eternity and Immutability. In William Mann (ed.), The Blackwell Guide to the Philosophy of Religion. Blackwell Pub.
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  34. Brian Leftow (1991). ``Timelessness and Foreknowledge&Quot. Philosophical Studies 63:309-325.
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  35. Brian Leftow (1991). Timelessness and Foreknowledge. Philosophical Studies 63 (3):309 - 325.
  36. Delmas Lewis (1987). Timelessness and Divine Agency. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 21 (3):143 - 159.
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  37. Don Lodzinski (1998). The Eternal Act. Religious Studies 34 (3):325-352.
    As a personal agent, God's act of creation involves deliberation about His possible courses of action, a decision to act in a certain way, and the execution of that decision. In this paper, I argue that there is good reason to suppose that God's deliberation of the possible worlds cannot make Him temporal. Furthermore, whether we favour a deterministic and indeterministic version of freedom, a model can be constructed of how God timelessly decides to create this world and respond to (...)
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  38. Murray MacBeath & Paul Helm (1989). Omniscience and Eternity. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 63 (1):55 - 87.
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  39. William E. Mann (1993). Time and Eternity. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 53 (4):954-958.
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  40. Arjan Markus (2004). Divine Timelessness: A Coherent but Unfruitful Doctrine? Sophia 43 (2):29-48.
    The author argues in this article that it is possible to have a consistent and coherent version of the doctrine of divine timelessness. Towards the objection that a timeless God cannot act it is defended that a timeless God can certainly act in the world and can love human people. In spite of the consistency and coherence of the doctrine of divine timelessness, however, the author has serious problems with the fruitfulness of this doctrine when it comes to essential practices (...)
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  41. Hubert Meisinger (2009). The Rhythm of God's Eternal Music: On Antje Jackelén's Time and Eternity. Zygon 44 (4):977-988.
    Antje Jackelén's book Time and Eternity is a thorough and carefully presented theology of time and, by its very essence, an incomplete and open thought model because time will always be dynamic and relational. This approach is an excellent example for the dialogue between science and religion because it uses resources not tapped in the dialogue so far: hymn-books stemming from Germany, Sweden, and the English-speaking world published between 1975 and 1995. They are taken as resources for a critical investigation (...)
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  42. R. T. Mullins (2016). Divine Perfection and Creation. Heythrop Journal 57 (1):122-134.
    Proclus (c.412-485) once offered an argument that Christians took to stand against the Christian doctrine of creation ex nihilo based on the eternity of the world and God’s perfection. John Philoponus (c.490-570) objected to this on various grounds. Part of this discussion can shed light on contemporary issues in philosophical theology on divine perfection and creation. First I will examine Proclus’ dilemma and John Philoponus’ response. I will argue that Philoponus’ fails to rebut Proclus’ dilemma. The problem is that presentism (...)
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  43. R. T. Mullins (2013). Simply Impossible: A Case Against Divine Simplicity. Journal of Reformed Theology 7 (2):181-203.
    Within contemporary philosophical theology the doctrine of divine simplicity has regained attention. There are several new defenses of simplicity in the literature. One of the more surprising, and troubling, aspects of the contemporary defenses amongst Christian philosophers and theologians is a seeming lack of understanding about how radical the doctrine of divine simplicity truly is. As such, I wish to do a few things in this paper. First, systematically articulate the doctrine of divine simplicity. Second, argue that divine simplicity is (...)
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  44. Michael J. Murray & Michael C. Rea (2008). An Introduction to the Philosophy of Religion. Cambridge University Press.
    Attributes of God: independence, goodness, and power Attributes of God: eternity, knowledge, and providence God triune and incarnate Faith and rationality Theistic arguments Anti-theistic arguments Religion and science Religion, morality, and politics Mind, body, and immortality.
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  45. Timothy O'Connor (1999). Simplicity and Creation. Faith and Philosophy 16 (3):405-412.
    According to many philosophical theologians, God is metaphysically simple: there is no real distinction among His attributes or even between attribute and existence itself. Here, I consider only one argument against the simplicity thesis. Its proponents claim that simplicity is incompatible with God's having created another world, since simplicity entails that God is unchanging across possible worlds. For, they argue, different acts of creation involve different willings, which are distinct intrinsic states. I show that this is mistaken, by sketching an (...)
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  46. N. D. O'Donoghue (1972). God and Timelessness. Philosophical Studies 21:320-322.
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  47. L. Nathan Oaklander (1977). The "Timelessness" of Time. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 38 (2):228-233.
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  48. Graham Oppy, Some Emendations to Leftow's Arguments About Time and Eternity (1998).
    This paper discusses some views defended by Brian Leftow in his book *Time and Eternity*. There is a revised version of this paper that is incorporated into my later book *Describing Gods: An Investigation of Divine Attributes* (CUP, 2014).
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  49. Alan G. Padgett (2000). God the Lord of Time: A Third Model of Eternity as Relative Timelessness. Philosophia Christi 2 (1):11-20.
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  50. Alan Gregory Padgett (1989). Divine Eternity and the Nature of Time. Dissertation, University of Oxford (United Kingdom)
    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. ;I examine the doctrine of the timelessness of God, and develop a new concept of eternity, which I call "relative timelessness." I argue that the traditional notion of eternity, viz. that God is absolutely timeless and immutable, can only be true if the stasis theory of time is true . This argument assumes that God is active in our history, in particular that God directly sustains the universe at (...)
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