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  1. Ishtiyaque Haji (1989). God and Omnispatiality. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 25 (2):99 - 108.
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  2. Matt McCormick (2000). Why God Cannot Think. Philo 3 (1):5-19.
    It has been argued that God is omnipresent, that is, present in all places and in all times. Omnipresence is also implied by God’s knowledge, power, and perfection. A Kantian argument shows that in order to be self-aware, apply concepts, and form judgments, in short, to have a mind, there must be objects that are external to a being that it can become aware of and grasp itself in relationship to. There can be no external objects for an omnipresent God, (...)
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  3. Raphaël Millière (forthcoming). Is God a Zombie? Divine Consciousness and Omnipresence. International Journal of Philosophy and Theology:1-17.
    While nobody will ever know what it may be like to be God, there is a more basic question one may try to answer: does God have phenomenal consciousness, does He have experiences within a conscious point of view (POV)? Drawing on recent debates within philosophy of mind, I argue that He doesn’t: if God exists, ‘He’ is not phenomenally conscious, at least in the sense that there is no ‘divine subjectivity’. The article aims at displaying an incompatibility between God’s (...)
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  4. Emily Thomas (2009). The Spatial Location of God. Think 8 (21):53-61.
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  5. Edward Wierenga, Omnipresence. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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