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  1. John E. Abbruzzese (1997). The Coherence of Omniscience: A Defense. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 41 (1):25-34.
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  2. Robert Merrihew Adams (1991). An Anti-Molinist Argument. Philosophical Perspectives 5:343-353.
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  3. Robert Merrihew Adams (1973). Middle Knowledge. Journal of Philosophy 70 (17):552-554.
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  4. Stig Rasmussen Alstrup (1987). The Intelligibility of Abortive Omniscience. Philosophical Quarterly 37 (48):315.
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  5. Torin Alter (2002). On Two Alleged Conflicts Between Divine Attributes. Faith and Philosophy 19 (1):47-57.
    Some argue that God’s omnipotence and moral perfection prevent God from being afraid and having evil desires and thus from understanding such states—which contradicts God’s omniscience. But, I argue, God could acquire such understanding indirectly, either by (i) perceiving the mental states of imperfect creatures, (ii) imaginatively combining the components of mental states with which God could be acquainted, or (iii) having false memory traces of such states. (i)–(iii) are consistent with the principal divine attributes.
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  6. Robert Anderson (2013). Molinism: The Contemporary Debate, Edited by Ken Perszyk. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 91 (3):627 - 628.
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  7. John Robert Baker (1972). Omniscience and Divine Synchronization. Process Studies 2 (3):201-208.
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  8. D. Basinger (2000). Divine Providence: The Molinist Account. Philosophical Review 109 (2):274-276.
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  9. David Basinger (1991). Middle Knowledge and Divine Control: Some Clarifications. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 30 (3):129 - 139.
    What then have we discovered? The general issue under discussion, remember, is whether it is advantageous or disadvantageous for the theist to affirm MK, especially as this form of knowledge relates to God's control over earthly affairs. As we have seen, both proponents and opponents of MK have claimed that this form of knowledge gives God significant power over earthly affairs, including control over the (indeterministically) free choices of humans.We have seen, though, that such a contention is dubious. There are (...)
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  10. David Basinger (1986). Omniscience and Deliberation: A Response to Reichenbach. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 20 (2/3):169 - 172.
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  11. David Basinger (1982). Divine Omniscience and the Best of All Possible Worlds. Journal of Value Inquiry 16 (2):143-148.
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  12. Robert Bass (2007). Omniscience and the Identification Problem. Florida Philosophical Review 7 (1):78-91.
    I discuss the propositional knowledge of an omniscient being, knowledge of facts that can be represented by that-clauses in sentences such as ‘John knows that the world is round.’ I shall focus upon questions about a supposedly omniscient being who propositionally knows the truth about all current states of affairs. I shall argue that there is no such being.
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  13. Robert W. Beard (1986). Professor Lucas on Omniscience. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 20 (1):37 - 43.
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  14. Stephen Richard Boothe (1978). Temporal Necessity and Divine Foreknowledge. Dissertation, University of California, Irvine
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  15. Tully Boreland, Omniscience and Divine Foreknowledge. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  16. Robert F. Brown (1991). Divine Omniscience, Immutability, Aseity and Human Free Will. Religious Studies 27 (3):285-295.
  17. T. Ryan Byerly (2011). Ockhamism Vs Molinism, Round 2: A Reply to Warfield. Religious Studies 47 (4):503 - 511.
    Ted Warfield has argued that if Ockhamism and Molinism offer different responses to the problems of foreknowledge and prophecy, it is the Molinist who is in trouble. I show here that this is not so -indeed, things may be quite the reverse.
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  18. Hector-Neri Castañeda (1967). Omniscience and Indexical Reference. Journal of Philosophy 64 (7):203-210.
  19. John Ross Churchill, Divine Sustenance and Theological Compatibilism.
    This thesis presents a case for theological compatibilism, the view that divine foreknowledge and human freedom are compatible. My attempt to support theological compatibilism is based chiefly upon two arguments, which appear in the second and third chapters of this thesis. While these arguments differ, they are united in one respect: each argument relies heavily upon the doctrine of divine sustenance, which is the doctrine that God is causally responsible for the continual existence of the universe. In chapter II, I (...)
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  20. David M. Ciocchi (2002). The Religious Adequacy of Free-Will Theism. Religious Studies 38 (1):45-61.
    In this paper I question the claim that the increasingly popular position known as ‘free-will theism’ or ‘the open view of God’ supports a rich religious life. To do this I advance a notion of ‘religious adequacy’, and then argue that free-will theism fails to be religiously adequate with respect to one of the principal practices of the religious life – petitionary prayer. Drawing on current work in libertarian free-will theory, I consider what are likely the only two lines of (...)
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  21. Nicola Ciprotti (2007). Dilemma di Newcomb, onniscienza e mondi possibili. In Gianfranco Pellegrino Ingrid Salvatore (ed.), Identità personale, libertà e realismo morale. Studi in onore di Robert Nozick. Luiss University Press.
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  22. Steven B. Cowan (2003). The Grounding Objection to Middle Knowledge Revisited. Religious Studies 39 (1):93-102.
    The Molinist doctrine that God has middle knowledge requires that God knows the truth-values of counterfactuals of freedom, propositions about what free agents would do in hypothetical circumstances. A well-known objection to middle knowledge, the grounding objection, contends that counterfactuals of freedom have no truth-value because there is no fact to the matter as to what an agent with libertarian freedom would do in counterfactual circumstances. Molinists, however, have offered responses to the grounding objection that they believe are adequate for (...)
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  23. William Lane Craig (1992). Hasker on Divine Knowledge. Philosophical Studies 67 (2):89 - 110.
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  24. William Lane Craig (1988). Tachyons, Time Travel, and Divine Omniscience. Journal of Philosophy 85 (3):135-150.
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  25. William Lane Craig (1988). William Ockham on Divine Foreknowledge and Future Contingency. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 69 (2):117.
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  26. William Lane Craig (1987). Process Theology's Denial of Divine Foreknowledge. Process Studies 16 (3):198-202.
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  27. Andrew Cullison (2006). Omniscience as a Dispositional State. Philosophia Christi 8 (1):151-160.
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  28. John Davenport, II. The Existentialist Critique of Molinism.
    Comparison of the preliminary objection to Haskar's and Adams's critiques of Molinism. The difficulty with Haskar's 'Power Inference Principle;' Adams's "New Anti-Molinist Argument;" William Lane Craig's recent response to Adams; Craig's defense of the 'emphemeral' Molinist logical possibility of doing otherwise; the two stages of the Existentialist's alternative strategy against Molinism.
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  29. Scott A. Davison (1991). Foreknowledge, Middle Knowledge and “Nearby” Worlds. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 30 (1):29 - 44.
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  30. John P. Doyle (1990). Luis de Molina: "On Divine Foreknowledge". [REVIEW] The Thomist 54 (2):369.
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  31. John P. Doyle (1990). On Divine Foreknowledge (Part IV of the Concordia). By Luis de Molina. Modern Schoolman 67 (4):308-310.
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  32. Markus Enders (2004). Sapientia Dei und Scientia mundi nach Bernhard von Clairvaux. Revista Portuguesa de Filosofia 60 (3):555 - 565.
    A noção de scientia mundi em Bernardo de Claraval lem um fundamento bíblico e uma conotação claramente pejorativa. Trata-se de um conhecimento que conduz à vaidade e, neste sentido, representa o conhecimento daqueles que são moralmente maus. Na sua teologia, inspirada em Paulo, Bernardo opõe a esta sabedoria negativamente qualificada do mundo a sabedoria de Deus a qual é idêntica com Cristo (sapientia Dei). Esta sabedoria é caracterizada pelos atributos da santidade e da paz. Os efeitos, dados por Deus, desta (...)
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  33. R. Lance Factor (1978). Newcomb's Paradox and Omniscience. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 9 (1):30 - 40.
  34. Alicia Finch & Michael Rea (2008). Presentism and Ockham's Way Out. Oxford Studies in Philosophy of Religion 1:1-17.
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  35. Jihn Martin Fischer (2009). More on Molinism. In Kevin Timpe & Eleonore Stump (eds.), Metaphysics and God: Essays in Honor of Eleonore Stump. Routledge.
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  36. John Martin Fischer (2011). I. Molinism and its Role. In Ken Perszyk (ed.), Molinism: The Contemporary Debate. Oup Oxford.
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  37. John Martin Fischer (2008). Molinism. Oxford Studies in Philosophy of Religion 1:18-43.
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  38. John Martin Fischer (1989). God, Foreknowledge, and Freedom. Stanford University Press.
    Introduction: God and Freedom John Martin Fischer Imagine that in some remote part of Connecticut there is a computer that has stored in its memory all truths about your life — past, present, and future. The computer contains all the ...
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  39. Thomas P. Flint (2011). The Molinist Debate: A Reply to Hasker. In Ken Perszyk (ed.), Molinism: The Contemporary Debate. Oup Oxford. 37.
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  40. Thomas P. Flint (1999). A New Anti-Anti-Molinist Argument. Religious Studies 35 (3):299-305.
    This paper argues that William Hasker's 'A new anti-Molinist argument' offers a fascinating but ultimately unsuccessful new instalment in his continuing campaign to discredit the picture of providence based on the theory of middle knowledge. It is first shown that Hasker's argument, though suffering from a seemingly irreparable logical gap, does nicely highlight a significant (and hitherto unduly underemphasized) point of contention between Molinists and anti-Molinists -- the question whether or not Molinists are committed to viewing counterfactuals of creaturely freedom (...)
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  41. Thomas P. Flint (1994). Divine Foreknowledge and Human Freedom: The Coherence of Theism: Omniscience. [REVIEW] International Studies in Philosophy 26 (1):107-107.
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  42. Thomas P. Flint (1991). Middle Knowledge and the Doctrine of Infallibility. Philosophical Perspectives 5:373-393.
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  43. Alfred Freddoso, Molinism.
    Molinism, named after Luis de Molina, is a theological system for reconciling human freedom with God's grace and providence. Presupposing a strongly libertarian account of freedom, Molinists assert against their rivals that the grace whereby God cooperates with supernaturally salvific acts is not intrinsically efficacious. To preserve divine providence and foreknowledge, they then posit "middle knowledge", through which God knows, prior to his own free decrees, how any possible rational agent would freely act in any possible situation. Beyond this, they (...)
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  44. Alfred Freddoso, The "Openness" of God: A Reply to William Hasker.
    Emulating Bill Hasker, I will begin with a few autobiographical remarks. Numbered among the half-dozen or so writers whom I have been most influenced by spiritually as well as intellectually are St. Augustine of Hippo and St. Thomas Aquinas. Having pondered at length the philosophical doctrines of God fashioned by these two brilliant and holy men, I find it difficult to entertain the idea that we moderns will be better positioned philosophically to make progress in our understanding of the divine (...)
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  45. Richard M. Gale (2002). Divine Omniscience, Human Freedom, and Backwards Causation. Faith and Philosophy 19 (1):85-88.
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  46. Gregory Ganssle (1993). Atemporality and the Mode of Divine Knowledge. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 34 (3):171 - 180.
    In this project, I explore and defend William Alston's claim that God does not have beliefs. Rather, He knows what He knows by direct intuition of facts. This direct intuition is absolute immediate awareness. It is immediate in that God knows what He knows without the mediation of other objects of knowledge. It is absolute in that His knowledge is not mediated by any other factors such as causal links between the object of knowledge and God's consciousness of it. ;My (...)
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  47. Jeffrey Green & Katherin Rogers (2012). Time, Foreknowledge, and Alternative Possibilities. Religious Studies 48 (2):151 - 164.
    In this article we respond to arguments from William Hasker and David Kyle Johnson that free will is incompatible with both divine foreknowledge and eternalism (what we refer to as isotemporalism). In particular, we sketch an Anselmian account of time and freedom, briefly defend the view against Hasker's critique, and then respond in more depth to Johnson's claim that Anselmian freedom is incompatible with free will because it entails that our actions are 'ontologically necessary'. In defending Anselmian freedom we argue (...)
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  48. Michael V. Griffin (1999). Leibniz on God's Knowledge of Counterfactuals. Philosophical Review 108 (3):317-343.
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  49. William Hasker (2000). Are Alternative Pasts Plausible? A Reply to Thomas Flint. Religious Studies 36 (1):103-105.
    Thomas Flint has claimed that my argument against Molinism suffers from a 'seemingly irreparable logical gap'. He also contests a key assumption of that argument, namely that 'something which has had causal consequences in the past is ipso facto a hard, fixed, settled fact about the past'. In reply, I show that there is no logical gap at all in the argument. And I argue that, even though Molinists have reasons, based on Molinist principles, for rejecting the assumption in question, (...)
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  50. William Hasker (1989). God, Time and Knowledge. Ithaca: Cornell University Press.
    ... or engenders a tradition of philosophical reflection, questions will arise about the relation between divine knowledge and power and human freedom. ...
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