This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories
Siblings:
59 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Order:
1 — 50 / 59
  1. Thomas Aquinas (2000). A Classic Defence of Divine Simplicity. In Brian Davies (ed.), Philosophy of Religion: A Guide and Anthology. OUP Oxford
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2. Matthew Baddorf (forthcoming). An Argument From Divine Beauty Against Divine Simplicity. Topoi:1-8.
    Some versions of the doctrine of divine simplicity imply that God lacks really differentiated parts. I present a new argument against these views based on divine beauty. The argument proceeds as follows: God is beautiful. If God is beautiful, then this beauty arises from some structure. If God’s beauty arises from a structure, then God possesses really differentiated parts. If these premises are true, then divine simplicity is false. I argue for each of the argument’s premises and defend it against (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3. Daniel Bennett (1969). The Divine Simplicity. Journal of Philosophy 66 (19):628-637.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  4. Michael Bergmann & Jeffrey E. Brower (2006). A Theistic Argument Against Platonism (and in Support of Truthmakers and Divine Simplicity). Oxford Studies in Metaphysics 2:357-386.
    Predication is an indisputable part of our linguistic behavior. By contrast, the metaphysics of predication has been a matter of dispute ever since antiquity. According to Plato—or at least Platonism, the view that goes by Plato’s name in contemporary philosophy—the truths expressed by predications such as “Socrates is wise” are true because there is a subject of predication (e.g., Socrates), there is an abstract property or universal (e.g., wisdom), and the subject exemplifies the property.1 This view is supposed to be (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  5. David Bradshaw (2012). Divine Simplicity and Divine Freedom in Maimonides and Gersonides. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 86:75-87.
    From the standpoint of belief in divine freedom , the medieval Aristotelian understanding of divine simplicity is deeply problematic. This is for two reasons. First, if the divine will and wisdom are identical, it would seem that God’s action must be wholly determined by His rational apprehension of the good. Second, if the divine will is identical with the divine essence, it would seem that for God to be able to do other than He does would mean that the divine (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6. Jeffrey Brower (2004). Trinity. In The Cambridge Companion to Abelard. Cambridge Univ Pr
    This article provides a sympathetic treatment of Abelard’s account of the Christian doctrine of the Trinity. It argues that the key to Abelard’s account lies in his ingenious defense of a form of numerical sameness without identity--a relation whose application to the Trinity he justifies on the grounds that it must be invoked to explain familiar cases of material constitution. The conclusion is that, although Abelard’s discussion provides the resources to establish the coherence of the Trinity, his attempt to reconcile (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7. Jeffrey E. Brower (2009). Simplicity and Aseity. In Thomas P. Flint & Michael C. Rea (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophical Theology. Oxford University Press 105-28.
    There is a traditional theistic doctrine, known as the doctrine of divine simplicity, according to which God is an absolutely simple being, completely devoid of any metaphysical complexity. On the standard understanding of this doctrine—as epitomized in the work of philosophers such as Augustine, Anselm, and Aquinas—there are no distinctions to be drawn between God and his nature, goodness, power, or wisdom. On the contrary, God is identical with each of these things, along with anything else that can be predicated (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  8. Jeffrey E. Brower (2008). Making Sense of Divine Simplicity. Faith and Philosophy 25 (1):3-30.
    According to the doctrine of divine simplicity, God is an absolutely simple being lacking any distinct metaphysical parts, properties, or constituents. Although this doctrine was once an essential part of traditional philosophical theology, it is now widely rejected as incoherent. In this paper, I develop an interpretation of the doctrine designed to resolve contemporary concerns about its coherence, as well as to show precisely what is required to make sense of divine simplicity.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  9. Caleb Cohoe (2015). Review of "Aquinas’s Way to God: The Proof in De Ente Et Essentia," Gaven Kerr. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2015.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10. Oliver D. Crisp (2003). Jonathan Edwards on Divine Simplicity. Religious Studies 39 (1):23-41.
    In this article I assess the coherence of Jonathan Edwards's doctrine of divine simplicity as an instance of an actus purus account of perfect-being theology. Edwards's view is an idiosyncratic version of this doctrine. This is due to a number of factors including his idealism and the Trinitarian context from which he developed his notion of simplicity. These complicating factors lead to a number of serious problems for his account, particularly with respect to the opera extra sunt indivisa principle. I (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11. Paul Jeffry Dehart (1997). Divine Simplicity: Theistic Reconstruction in Eberhard Juengel's Trinitarian "Glaubenslehre". Dissertation, The University of Chicago
    This study in the thought of an important but difficult thinker centers on his attempt to reformulate the identity of essence and existence characterizing God's being in a way which does justice both to modern self-consciousness and to Christian faith's understanding of the crucified Christ as God's self-identification. The result is an ontology of God's "death" in Jesus which resonates throughout Jungel's thought and positions the Trinity with respect to the traditions of metaphysical theism. ;An initial chapter orients the reader (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12. Vincent Michael Dever (1994). Divine Simplicity: Aquinas and the Current Debate. Dissertation, Marquette University
    This dissertation examines problems concerning divine simplicity. Classical theism maintains in the doctrine of simplicity that God lacks any composition of physical parts, metaphysical principles or logically distinct elements. Thomas Aquinas' sophisticated elaboration of divine simplicity has recently come under attack by prominent thinkers, most notable of which is Alvin Plantinga. These objectors note both instances of incoherence within the doctrine of simplicity as well as its incompatibility with Scripture and its depiction of God. ;The procedure of the dissertation is (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13. L. Dewan (1989). Thomas, Plantinga, Alvin, and the Divine-Simplicity. Modern Schoolman 66 (2):141-151.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14. Lawrence Dewan (1989). Saint Thomas, Alvin Plantinga, and the Divine Simplicity. Modern Schoolman 66 (2):141-151.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  15. Kent Dunnington (2007). Chapter Eight The Impassible Suffered: Divine Love and the Doctrine of Divine Impassibility By Kent Dunnington. In Thomas Jay Oord (ed.), The Many Facets of Love: Philosophical Explorations. Cambridge Scholars Publishing 66.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16. Everett Fulmer (forthcoming). Love, Justice, and Divine Simplicity. In Ingolf Dalferth (ed.), Claremont Studies in the Philosophy of Religion: Love and Justice. Mohr Siebeck
    Love seems to be an inherently biased and partial relation. Justice seems to require the opposite: detached impartiality (think, e.g., of the attributes of a just judge). If these are conceptual facts, then traditional theism is guilty of ascribing inconsistent attributes to God: perfect love and perfect justice. I wish to discuss this apparent paradox below. I argue that detached impartiality is not essential to justice, but is only a means for achieving what is: equality of consideration. And while detached (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17. W. Matthews Grant (2012). Divine Simplicity, Contingent Truths, and Extrinsic Models of Divine Knowing. Faith and Philosophy 29 (3):254-274.
    A well-known objection to divine simplicity holds that the doctrine is incompatible with God’s contingent knowledge. I set out the objection and reject two problematic solutions. I then argue that the objection is best answered by adopting an “extrinsic model of divine knowing” according to which God’s contingent knowledge, which varies across worlds, does not involve any intrinsic variation in God. Solutions along these lines have been suggested by others. This paper advances the discussion by developing and offering partial defenses (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18. Dan Kaufman (2003). Divine Simplicity and the Eternal Truths in Descartes. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 11 (4):553 – 579.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  19. Anders Kraal (2011). Logic and Divine Simplicity. Philosophy Compass 6 (4):282-294.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  20. Norman Kretzmann (1985). Absolute Simplicity. Faith and Philosophy 2 (4):353-382.
    The doctrine of God’s absolute simplicity denies the possibility of real distinctions in God. It is, e.g., impossible that God have any kind of parts or any intrinsic accidental properties, or that there be real distinctions among God’s essential properties or between any of them and God himself. After showing that some of the counter-intuitive implications of the doctrine can readily be made sense of, the authors identify the apparent incompatibility of God’s simplicity and God’s free choice as a special (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  21. Jonathan Kvanvig (1984). Divine Transcendence. Religious Studies 20 (3):377 - 387.
    representations, for the unconditioned transcendent surpasses every possible conception of a being, including even the conception of a Supreme Being... It is the religious function of atheism ever to remind us that the religious act has to do with the unconditioned transcendent, and that the representations of the Unconditioned are not objects concerning whose existence.., a discussion would be possible. The word >God= involves a double meaning: it connotes the unconditioned transcendent, the ultimate, and also an object somehow endowed with (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  22. Brian Lang (2004). Cartesian Simplicity. Dissertation, University of Missouri - Columbia
    On several occasions Descartes commits himself to the orthodox theistic doctrine of Divine Attribute Simplicity . On this view God is identical to the members of the set of His essential attributes. So He is identical to omnipotence, omniscience, and the like. This view suffers from the serious defect of entailing that God is identical to the attribute of self-identity and thus that anything which is self-identical must also be omnipotent, omniscient, etc. Moreover, the most prominent contemporary accounts of DAS (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23. Brian Leftow (2009). Aquinas, Divine Simplicity and Divine Freedom. In Kevin Timpe & Eleonore Stump (eds.), Metaphysics and God: Essays in Honor of Eleonore Stump. Routledge
  24. Brian Leftow (2006). Divine Simplicity. Faith and Philosophy 23 (4):365-380.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  25. Brian Leftow (1990). Is God an Abstract Object? Noûs 24 (4):581-598.
    Before Duns Scotus, most philosophers agreed that God is identical with His necessary intrinsic attributes--omnipotence, omniscience, etc. This Identity Thesis was a component of widely held doctrines of divine simplicity, which stated that God exemplifies no metaphysical distinctions, including that between subject and attribute. The Identity Thesis seems to render God an attribute, an abstract object. This paper shows that the Identity Thesis follows from a basic theistic belief and does not render God abstract. If also discusses how one might (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  26. Brian Lee Leftow (1984). Simplicity and Eternity. Dissertation, Yale University
    Medieval philosophers distinguished God from all else by calling Him supremely one. Realists about properties affirmed God's special unity by arguing either that God cannot be conceived to be without His properties or that God wholly lacks the real complexity having properties involves. ;This thesis examines the latter, more radical doctrine of divine simplicity. On this doctrine, for all F, what makes God F differs in no way from what makes Him God. ;If all truths about God have the same (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27. William E. Mann (1986). Simplicity and Properties: A Reply to Morris. Religious Studies 22 (3/4):343 - 353.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  28. William E. Mann (1983). Simplicity and Immutability in God. International Philosophical Quarterly 23 (3):267-276.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  29. William E. Mann (1982). Divine Simplicity. Religious Studies 18 (4):451 - 471.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  30. Nicholas Martin (forthcoming). Simplicity’s Deficiency: Al-Ghazali’s Defense of the Divine Attributes and Contemporary Trinitarian Metaphysics. Topoi:1-9.
    I reconstruct and analyze al-Ghazali’s arguments defending a plurality of real divine attributes in The Incoherence of the Philosophers. I show that one of these arguments can be made to engage with and defend Jeffrey E. Brower and Michael C. Rea’s “Numerical Sameness Without Identity” model of the Trinity. To that end, I provide some background on the metaphysical commitments at play in al-Ghazali’s arguments.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31. Douglas McDermid (2013). God Without Parts: Divine Simplicity and the Metaphysics of God's Absoluteness. By James E. Dolezal. Pp. Xxii, 240, Eugene, OR, Wipf and Stock, 2011, $23.53. [REVIEW] Heythrop Journal 54 (2):319-320.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32. Barry Miller (1994). On “Divine Simplicity - A New Defense”. Faith and Philosophy 11 (3):474-477.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33. John Morreall (1978). Divine Simplicity and Divine Properties. Journal of Critical Analysis 7 (2):67-70.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34. Thomas V. Morris (2000). Problems with Divine Simplicity. In Brian Davies (ed.), Philosophy of Religion: A Guide and Anthology. OUP Oxford
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35. Thomas V. Morris (1988). Dependence and Divine Simplicity. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 23 (3):161 - 174.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  36. Nicola Mößner & Markus Seidel (2008). Is the Principle of Testimony Simply Epistemically Fundamental or Simply Not? Swinburne on Knowledge by Testimony. In Nicola Mößner, Sebastian Schmoranzer & Christian Weidemann (eds.), Richard Swinburne. Christian Philosophy in a Modern World. Ontos
    The recently much discussed phenomenon of testimony as a social source of knowledge plays a crucial justificatory role in Richard Swinburne's philosophy of religion. Although Swinburne officially reduces his principle of testimony to the criterion of simplicity and, therefore, to a derivative epistemic source, we will show that simplicity does not play the crucial role in this epistemological context. We will argue that both Swinburne's philosophical ideas and his formulations allow for a fundamental epistemic principle of testimony, by showing that (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37. R. T. Mullins (2016). Divine Perfection and Creation. Heythrop Journal 57 (1):122-134.
    Proclus (c.412-485) once offered an argument that Christians took to stand against the Christian doctrine of creation ex nihilo based on the eternity of the world and God’s perfection. John Philoponus (c.490-570) objected to this on various grounds. Part of this discussion can shed light on contemporary issues in philosophical theology on divine perfection and creation. First I will examine Proclus’ dilemma and John Philoponus’ response. I will argue that Philoponus’ fails to rebut Proclus’ dilemma. The problem is that presentism (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38. R. T. Mullins (2013). Simply Impossible: A Case Against Divine Simplicity. Journal of Reformed Theology 7 (2):181-203.
    Within contemporary philosophical theology the doctrine of divine simplicity has regained attention. There are several new defenses of simplicity in the literature. One of the more surprising, and troubling, aspects of the contemporary defenses amongst Christian philosophers and theologians is a seeming lack of understanding about how radical the doctrine of divine simplicity truly is. As such, I wish to do a few things in this paper. First, systematically articulate the doctrine of divine simplicity. Second, argue that divine simplicity is (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  39. Timothy O'Connor (2004). And This All Men Call God. Faith and Philosophy 21 (4):417-435.
    Philosophical discussion of theistic arguments mainly focus on their first (existence) stage, which argues for the existence of something having some very general, if suggestive, feature. I shall instead consider only the second (identification) stage of one such argument, the cosmologic al argument from contingency. Taking for granted the existence of an absolutely necessary being, I develop an extended line of argument that supports the..
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  40. Timothy O'Connor (1999). Simplicity and Creation. Faith and Philosophy 16 (3):405-412.
    According to many philosophical theologians, God is metaphysically simple: there is no real distinction among His attributes or even between attribute and existence itself. Here, I consider only one argument against the simplicity thesis. Its proponents claim that simplicity is incompatible with God's having created another world, since simplicity entails that God is unchanging across possible worlds. For, they argue, different acts of creation involve different willings, which are distinct intrinsic states. I show that this is mistaken, by sketching an (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  41. Graham Oppy (2003). The Devilish Complexities of Divine Simplicity. Philo 6 (1):10-22.
    In On the Nature and Existence of God, Richard Gale follows majority opinion in giving very short shrift to the doctrine of divine simplicity: in his view, there is no coherent expressible doctrine of divine simplicity. Rising to the implicit challenge, I argue that---contrary to what is widely believed---there is a coherently expressible doctrine of divine simplicity, though it is rather different from the views that are typically expressed by defenders of this doctrine. At the very least, I think that (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  42. Timothy J. Pawl (2013). God Without Parts: Divine Simplicity and the Metaphysics of God's Absoluteness, by James E. Dolezal. Faith and Philosophy 30 (4):480-486.
    This is a review of _God Without Parts: Divine Simplicity and the Metaphysics of God's Absoluteness_, by James E. Dolezal.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43. Marek A. Pepliński (2016). Prostota (Boga - Simplicity of God). In Janusz Salamon (ed.), Przewodnik po filozofii religii. Nurt analityczny, Kraków 2016. Wydawnictwo WAM 87-107.
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
      Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44. Susan Peppers-Bates (2008). Divine Simplicity and Divine Command Ethics. International Philosophical Quarterly 48 (3):361-369.
    In this paper I will argue that a false assumption drives the attraction of philosophers to a divine command theory of morality. Specifically, I suggest the idea thatanything not created by God is independent of God is a misconception. The idea misleads us into thinking that our only choice in offering a theistic ground for morality is between making God bow to a standard independent of his will or God creating morality in revealing his will. Yet what is God is (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45. Andrew Pessin (2010). Divine Simplicity and the Eternal Truths: Descartes and the Scholastics. Philosophia 38 (1):69-105.
    Descartes famously endorsed the view that (CD) God freely created the eternal truths, such that He could have done otherwise than He did. This controversial doctrine is much discussed in recent secondary literature, yet Descartes’s actual arguments for CD have received very little attention. In this paper I focus on what many take to be a key Cartesian argument for CD: that divine simplicity entails the dependence of the eternal truths on the divine will. What makes this argument both important (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46. Steve Petersen, Simplicity Tracks Truth Because Compression Tracks Probability.
    The simplicity of a theory seems closely related to how well the theory summarizes individual data points. Think, for example, of classic curve-fitting. It is easy to get perfect data-fit with a ‘‘theory’’ that simply lists each point of data, but such a theory is maximally unsimple (for the data-fit). The simple theory suggests instead that there is one underlying curve that summarizes this data, and we usually prefer such a theory even at some expense in data-fit. In general, it (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47. Alexander Pruss (2008). On Two Problems of Divine Simplicity. Oxford Studies in Philosophy of Religion 1:150-167.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  48. Mohammad Saeedimehr (2007). Divine Simplicity. Topoi 26 (2):191-199.
    According to a doctrine widely held by most medieval philosophers and theologians, whether in the Muslim or Christian world, there are no metaphysical distinctions in God whatsoever. As a result of the compendious theorizing that has been done on this issue, the doctrine, usually called the doctrine of divine simplicity, has been bestowed a prominent status in both Islamic and Christian philosophical theology. In Islamic philosophy some well-known philosophers, such as Ibn Sina (980–1037) and Mulla Sadra (1571–1640), developed this doctrine (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49. Noël B. Saenz (2014). Against Divine Truthmaker Simplicity. Faith and Philosophy 31 (4):460-474.
    Divine Simplicity has it that God is absolutely simple. God exhibits no metaphysical complexity; he has neither proper parts nor distinct intrinsic properties. Recently, Jeffrey Brower has put forward an account of divine simplicity that has it that God is the truthmaker for all intrinsic essential predications about him. This allows Brower to preserve the intuitive thought that God is not a property but a concrete being. In this paper, I provide two objections to Brower’s account that are meant to (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  50. Yann Schmitt (2106). L'être de Dieu. Editions d'Ithaque.
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 59