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  1. Peter Achinstein (2012). Dasgupta, Shamik 123 N5 Davidson, Donald 219, 219 N10, 223, 225-6, 244 N12. In Fabrice Correia & Benjamin Schnieder (eds.), Metaphysical Grounding: Understanding the Structure of Reality. Cambridge University Press. 306.
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  2. E. M. Adams (1974). Lee on Experience, Conceptual Schemes and Virgin Reality. Southern Journal of Philosophy 12 (1):127-136.
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  3. Jay Allman (2001). Metaphor and Davidson's Theory of Interpretation. Southern Journal of Philosophy 39 (1):1-22.
  4. M. Cristina Amoretti & Nicla Vassallo (eds.) (2008). Knowledge, Language, and Interpretation: On the Philosophy of Donald Davidson. Ontos Verlag.
    Thanks to their heterogeneity, the nine essays in this volume offer a clear testimony of Donald Davidson's authority, and they undoubtedly show how much his work - even if it has raised many doubts and criticisms - has been, and still is, highly influential and significant in contemporary analytical philosophy for a wide range of subjects. Moreover, the various articles not only critically and carefully analyse Davidson's theses and arguments (in particular those concerning language and knowledge), but they also illustrate (...)
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  5. Kristin Andrews (2002). Interpreting Autism: A Critique of Davidson on Thought and Language. Philosophical Psychology 15 (3):317-332.
    Donald Davidson's account of interpretation purports to be a priori , though I argue that the empirical facts about interpretation, theory of mind, and autism must be considered when examining the merits of Davidson's view. Developmental psychologists have made plausible claims about the existence of some people with autism who use language but who are unable to interpret the minds of others. This empirical claim undermines Davidson's theoretical claims that all speakers must be interpreters of other speakers and that one (...)
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  6. Julia Annas (1976). Davidson and Anscombe on `the Same Action'. Mind 85 (338):251-257.
  7. Ricardo Navia Antelo (2008). Naturalismo y Argumentación Transcendental En Donald Davidson. Conjectura: Filosofia E Educação 13 (2):43-57.
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  8. Karl-Otto Apel (1984). Comments on Davidson. Synthese 59 (1):19 - 26.
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  9. Inês Araújo (2009). An Approach to D. Davidson's “Radical Interpretation” Theory. Filosofia Unisinos 10 (3):302-316.
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  10. Pall S. Árdal (1989). Hume and Davidson on Pride. Hume Studies 15 (2):387-394.
  11. Roberto Aristegui (1999). Indeterminación de la Traducción Radical, Constructivismo y Psicoterapia. Cinta de Moebio 6.
    En este ensayo se presenta la tesis de la Indeterminación de la Traducción Radical (IT) de Quine aplicándola al campo de la epistemología clínica abierto por la crítica del constructivismo a la psicoterapia tradicional. A fin de mostrar la relevancia de la tesis IT como programa vigente de compr..
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  12. David M. Armstrong (1975). Beliefs and Desires as Causes of Actions: A Reply to Donald Davidson. Philosophical Papers 4 (May):1-7.
  13. Sonia Arribas (2007). Normativity Without Exception: Donald Davidson On Language And Communication. Sorites 18:76-97.
    This paper deals with three texts by Donald Davidson's that discuss the issue of linguistic innovation from different epistemological standpoints. I show that Davidson's theory of metaphor undergoes a crucial transformation: from an early stage in which metaphor is viewed as an unintelligible and exceptional element external to language, to a later stage in which it is conceived as intrinsic to language, and thus as potentially understandable. This tracing of Davidson's development leads me to formulate an understanding of the concepts (...)
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  14. José Maria Arruda (2005). Verdade, interpretação e objetividade em Donald Davidson. Veritas 50 (1):137-154.
    Donald Davidson foi um dos filósofos mais influentes da tradição analítica da segunda metade do século. A unidade de sua obra é constituída pelo papel central que reflexão sobre como podemos interpretar os proferimentos de um outro falante desempenha para a compreensão da natureza do significado. Davidson adota o ponto de vista metodológico de um intérprete que não pode pressupor nada sobre o significado das palavras de um falante e que não possui nenhum conhecimento detalhado de suas atitudes proposicionais. Neste (...)
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  15. M. Ashraf Adeel (1991). Language and Translatability: Tarski Versus Davidson. International Philosophical Quarterly 31 (124):419-426.
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  16. Anita Avramides (2001). Davidson, Grice, and the Social Aspects of Language. In G. Cosenza (ed.), Paul Grice's Heritage. 9--115.
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  17. Emily Ayoob, Black & Davidson on Metaphor.
    Most theories of metaphor look at what occurs inside a metaphorical phrase and posit a shift in meaning in the metaphorical words. This includes the classic “Models and Metaphor,” by Max Black, who distinguishes between the literal words of the phrase and the metaphorical words. On this view, the two interact in such a way that the meanings of the metaphorical words change. In another view, Donald Davidson takes a radical stance in his “What Metaphors Mean” to assert that the (...)
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  18. Maria Baghramian (1998). Why Conceptual Schemes? Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 98 (3):287–306.
    According to Donald Davidson, the very idea of a conceptual scheme is the third dogma of empiricism. In this paper I examine the ways in which this claim may be interpreted. I conclude by arguing that there remains an innocent version of the scheme-content distinction which is not motivated by empiricism and does not commit us to the pernicious type of dualism that Davidson rejects.
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  19. Maria Baghramian (1990). Rorty, Davidson and Truth. Ratio 3 (2):101-116.
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  20. Thomas Baldwin (1997). Frege, Moore, Davidson: The Indefinability of Truth. Philosophical Topics 25 (2):1-18.
  21. Thomas Baldwin (1982). Prior and Davidson on Indirect Speech. Philosophical Studies 42 (2):255 - 282.
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  22. Eivind Balsvik (2003). An Interpretation and Assessment of First-Person Authority in the Writings of Philosopher Donald Davidson. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  23. Yehoshua Bar-Hillel (ed.) (1965). Proceedings of the International Congress for Logic, Methodology, and Philosophy of Science. North-Holland.
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  24. Michael Grulrow Barnhart (1991). Relativity and Rationality. Dissertation, Temple University
    This work represents an attempt to formulate a relativistically-sensitive model of rationality. Thus, two distinct issues need to be addressed. On the one hand, why is such an approach necessary? On the other, what is the salient logical feature of such an account which would serve to differentiate it from the standard accounts? ;The need for such a new model is traced to conceptual difficulties which stem from post-empiricistic epistemology. While Donald Davidson's "third dogma of empiricism," the duality of scheme (...)
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  25. Peter Baumann (1996). Davidson on Sharing a Language and Correct Language-Use. Grazer Philosophische Studien 52:137-160.
    Donald Davidson has argued against a thesis that is widely shared in the philosophy of language, e.g., by Wittgenstein, Dummett and Kripke: the thesis that successful communication requires that speaker and hearer share a common language. Davidson's arguments, however, are not convincing. Moreover, Davidson's own positive account of communication poses a serious problem: it cannot offer criteria for the correct use of a language, especially in the case of a language that only one speaker speaks. Even though Davidson's own position (...)
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  26. Marta Bayarres (2010). El Externalismo En la Filosofía de Donald Davidson. A Parte Rei: Revista de Filosofía 71:10.
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  27. Julien Beillard (2010). Triangles, Schemes and Worlds: Reply to Nulty. [REVIEW] Metaphysica 11 (2):181-190.
    Nulty proposes a Davidsonian argument for metaphysical pluralism, the thesis that there are (or could be) many actual worlds, which appeals to the possibility of alien forms of triangulation. I dispute Nulty’s reading of Davidson on two important points: Davidson’s attack on the notion of a conceptual scheme is not, as Nulty thinks, directed at pluralism, and his understanding of the notions of objective truth and reality is at odds with the conception needed for Nulty’s argument. I also show (...)
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  28. Dave Beisecker (2006). Extending Triangulation. Southwest Philosophy Review 22 (2):87-90.
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  29. David Beisecker (2002). Some More Thoughts About Thought and Talk: Davidson and Fellows on Animal Belief. Philosophy 77 (1):115-124.
    Donald Davidson's argument that non-linguistic creatures lack beliefs rests on two premises: (1) to be a believer, one must have the concept of belief, and (2) to have the concept of belief, one must interpret the utterances of others. However, Davidson's defense of these premises is overly compressed and unconvincing. In a recent issue of Philosophy, Roger Fellows provides new arguments for these premises. In this paper, I explain why I'm not persuaded by Fellows' attempt to bolster Davidson's line of (...)
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  30. J. Bennett (1985). Davidson, D. "Inquiries Into Truth and Interpretation". [REVIEW] Mind 94:601.
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  31. Lars Bergström & Dagfinn Føllesdal (1994). Interview with Donald Davidson in November 1993. Theoria 60 (3):207-225.
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  32. Sven Bernecker (1996). Davidson on First-Person Authority and Externalism. Inquiry 39 (1):121-39.
    Incompatibilism is the view that privileged knowledge of our own mental states cannot be reconciled with externalism regarding the content of mental states. Davidson has recently developed two arguments that are supposed to disprove incompatibilism and establish the consistency of privileged access and externalism. One argument criticizes incompatibilism for assuming that externalism conflicts with the mind?body identity theory. Since mental states supervene on neurological events, Davidson argues, they are partly ?in the head? and are knowable just by reflection. Another argument (...)
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  33. Henk Bij de Weg, Reason and the Structure of Davidson's "Desire-Belief Model".
    of “Reason and the structure of Davidson’s ‘Desire-Belief-Model’ ” by Henk bij de Weg In the present discussion in the analytic theory of action, broadly two models for the explanation or justification of actions can be distinguished: the internalist and the externalist model. Against this background, I discuss Davidson’s version of the internalist Desire-Belief Model . First, I show that what Davidson calls “pro attitude” has two distinct meanings. An implication of this is that Davidson’s DBM actually comprises two different (...)
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  34. Renée Bilodeau (1993). Donald Davidson, Paradoxes de l'irrationalité, tr. de Pascal Engel, Combas, Éditions de l'Éclat, coll. « Tiré à part », 1991.Donald Davidson, Paradoxes de l'irrationalité, tr. de Pascal Engel, Combas, Éditions de l'Éclat, coll. « Tiré à part », 1991. [REVIEW] Philosophiques 20 (2):503-506.
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  35. Max Black (2010). How Metaphors Work : A Reply to Donald Davidson. In Darragh Byrne & Max Kölbel (eds.), Critical Inquiry. Routledge. 131.
    To be able to produce and understand metaphorical statements is nothing much to boast about: these familiar skills, which children seem to acquire as they learn to talk, are perhaps no more remarkable than our ability to tell and to understand jokes. How odd then that it remains difficult to explain what we do in grasping metaphorical statements. In a provocative paper, "What Metaphors Mean,"1 Donald Davidson has recently charged many students of metaphor, ancient and modern, with having committed a (...)
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  36. S. Blackburn (2003). Donald Davidson. Critica.
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  37. William K. Blackburn (1987). Davidson on Force and Convention. Analysis 47 (2):72-74.
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  38. Laura Blažetić (2003). Donald Herbert Davidson (1917–2003). Prolegomena 2 (2):257-261.
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  39. Damjan Bojadžiev (1989). Davidson's Semantics and Computational Understanding of Language. Grazer Philosophische Studien 36:133-139.
    Evaluating the usefulness of Davidson's semantics to computational understanding of language requires an examination of the role of a theory of truth in characterizing sentence meaning and logical form, and in particular of the connection between meaning and belief. The suggested conclusion is that the relevance of Davidson's semantics for computational semantics lies not so much in its methods and particular proposals of logical form as in its general orientation towards "desubstantializing" meaning.
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  40. Ron Bombardi (1988). Davidson in Flatland. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 66 (1):67 – 74.
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  41. Rosario Hernández Borges (2004). Donald Davidson: In Memoriam. Laguna 14:195-200.
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  42. Rosario Hernández Borges (2003). " Subjetive, Intersubjetive, Objetive", de Donald Davidson. Teorema: Revista Internacional de Filosofía 22 (1):105-108.
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  43. Cristina Borgoni & Herivelto Souza (2009). Davidson's Externalisms. Universitas Philosophica 53:65-87.
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  44. Giovanna Borradori (1994). The American Philosopher: Conversations with Quine, Davidson, Putnam, Nozick, Danto, Rorty, Cavell, Macintyre, and Kuhn. University of Chicago Press.
    In this lively look at current debates in American philosophy, leading philosophers talk candidly about the changing character of their discipline. In the spirit of Emerson's The American Scholar , this book explores the identity of the American philosopher. Through informal conversations, the participants discuss the rise of post-analytic philosophy in America and its relations to European thought and to the American pragmatist tradition. They comment on their own intellectual development as well as each others' work, charting the course of (...)
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  45. Giovanna Borradori & tr Crocitto, Rosanna (1995). Book Review: The American Philosopher: Conversations with Quine, Davidson, Putnam, Nozick, Danto, Rorty, Cavell, Macintyre, and Kuhn. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Literature 19 (2).
  46. Lisa Bortolotti (2008). What Does Fido Believe? Think 7 (19):7-15.
    Lisa Bortolotti introduces the arguments about whether dogs can have beliefs.
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  47. Lisa Bortolotti (2005). Intentionality Without Rationality. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 105 (3):385-392.
    It is often taken for granted in standard theories of interpretation that there cannot be intentionality without rationality. According to the background argument, a system can be interpreted as having irrational beliefs only against a general background of rationality. Starting from the widespread assumption that delusions can be reasonably described as irrational beliefs, I argue here that the background argument fails to account for their intentional description.
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  48. Andrea C. Bottani (2008). The Place of Ontology in Davidson's Theory of Interpretation. In M. Cristina Amoretti & Nicla Vassallo (eds.), Knowledge, Language, and Interpretation: On the Philosophy of Donald Davidson. Ontos Verlag. 14--147.
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  49. H. K. Bouma (2006). Radical Interpretation and High-Functioning Autistic Speakers: A Defense of Davidson on Thought and Language. Philosophical Psychology 19 (5):639-662.
    Donald Davidson argues in "Thought and Talk" that all speakers must be interpreters of other speakers: linguistic competence requires the possession of intentional concepts and the ability to attribute intentional states to other people. Kristin Andrews (in Philosophical Psychology, 15) has argued that empirical evidence about autism undermines this theoretical claim, for some individuals with autism lack the requisite "theory of mind" skills to be able to interpret, yet are competent speakers. In this paper, Davidson is defended on the grounds (...)
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  50. Michael Bourke (2012). Davidson’s Account Of Truth And Fictional Meaning. Praxis 3 (2):1-27.
    Fictional and non-fictional texts rely on the same language to express their meaning; yet many philosophers in the analytic tradition would say, with reason, that fictional texts literally make no truth claims, or more modestly that the rhetorical and literary devices to which fiction and non-fiction writers alike have recourse are unconnected to truth or have no propositional content. These related views are associated with a doctrine in the philosophy of language, most notably advanced by the late Donald Davidson, which (...)
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