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  1. J. L. Ackrill (1979). H. Wijsenbeek-Wijler: Aristotle's Concept of Soul, Sleep and Dreams. Pp. X + 259. Amsterdam: Hakkert, 1978. Paper, 64 Sw. Frs. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 29 (02):321-322.
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  2. M. M. Zuhuruddin[from old catalog] Ahmad (1936). A Peep Into the Spiritual Unconscious (a Philosophical Attempt to Explain the Phenomenon of Dreams). [Bombay, India Printing Works.
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  3. Linda Alcoff (2008). Dreaming of Iris. Philosophy Today 52 (Supplement):4-9.
    This paper provides a memoir and overview of Iris Young's philosophy and a discussion of her account of gender identity.
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  4. Fernando Andacht (2001). Those Powerful Materialized Dreams: Peirce on Icons and the Human Imagination. American Journal of Semiotics 17 (3):91-116.
  5. Rita B. Ardito (2000). Dreaming as an Active Construction of Meaning. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (6):907-908.
    Although the work of Revonsuo is commendable for its attempt to use an evolutionary approach to formulate a hypothesis about the adaptive function of dreaming, the conclusions arrived at by this author cannot be fully shared. Particularly questionable is the idea that the specific function of dreaming is to simulate threatening events. I propose here a hypothesis in which the dream can have a different function. [Revonsuo].
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  6. Jose Maria Ariso, The Error of Thinking That the Picture of Actual Dreams Can Be Used in Only One Way.
    In 1914, the Spanish novelist, dramatist, poet and philosopher Miguel de Unamuno published one of his well-known works, Niebla. Unamuno allows that his characters speak and speak although they say nothing at all: in this way the author begins believing he takes his characters by the hand, but in the end becomes his characters´ fiction. And not only does Unamuno give free rein to his characters´ dialogues but describes thoughts and feelings in great detail too; as a matter of fact, (...)
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  7. Aristotle, Dreams.
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  8. Aristotle, On Dreams.
  9. Marc Augé (1999). The War of Dreams: Exercises in Ethno-Fiction. Pluto Press.
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  10. Susan E. Babbitt (1996). Impossible Dreams: Rationality, Integrity, and Moral Imagination. Westview Press.
    Conventional wisdom and commonsense morality tend to take the integrity of persons for granted. But for people in systematically unjust societies, self-respect and human dignity may prove to be impossible dreams.Susan Babbitt explores the implications of this insight, arguing that in the face of systemic injustice, individual and social rationality may require the transformation rather than the realization of deep-seated aims, interests, and values. In particular, under such conditions, she argues, the cultivation and ongoing exercise of moral imagination is necessary (...)
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  11. M. J. Baker (1954). Sleeping and Waking. Mind 63 (October):539-543.
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  12. Colette Jane Balmain, Genre, Gender, Giallo: The Disturbed Dreams of Dario Argento.
    This thesis presents an examination of the giallo films of Dario Argento from his directorial debut The Bird with the Crystal Plumage (1970) to The Stendhal Syndrome' (1996). In opposition to the dominant psychoanalytical approaches to the horror film generally and Argento's giallo specifically, this thesis argues that the giallo, both textually and meta-textually, actively resists oedipalisation. Taking up from Deleuze's contention in Cinema 1: The Movement Image that the cinematic-image can be consider the equivalent to a philosophical concept, I (...)
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  13. V. Barnard (2011). Dreaming: A Recovery Story. Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 1 (1):3-4.
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  14. D. Barrett & P. McNamara (eds.) (2007). The New Science of Dreaming. Praeger Publishers.
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  15. Errol Bedford (1961). Dreaming, by Norman Malcolm. (London: Routledge and Kegan Paul. 1959. Pp. 128. Price 12s. 6d.). Philosophy 36 (138):377-.
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  16. Christian Beenfeldt (2008). A Wake Up Call—or More Sweet Slumber? A Review of Daniel Dennett's Sweet Dreams: Philosophical Obstacles to a Science of Consciousness. Think 7 (19):85-92.
    Beenfeldt assesses Dennett's approach to the philosophical problem of consciousness.
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  17. Ermanno Bencivenga (1983). Descartes, Dreaming, and Professor Wilson. Journal of the History of Philosophy 21 (1):75-85.
    In her book "descartes", Margaret wilson proposes a new interpretation of the dreaming argument. According to this interpretation, Descartes does not reach his conclusion via a subconclusion that I cannot be certain that I am not dreaming (as was claimed by more traditional authors such as moore, Malcolm, Frankfurt, And walsh), But rather directly, By pointing out that I cannot be certain that waking experience is veridical. The present article examines the arguments supporting wilson's interpretation, And finds them to be (...)
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  18. Donald Black (2000). Dreams of Pure Sociology. Sociological Theory 18 (3):343-367.
    Unlike older sciences such as physics and biology, sociology has never had a revolution. Modern sociology is still classical-largely psychological, teleological, and individualistic-and even less scientific than classical sociology. But pure sociology is different: It predicts and explains the behavior of social life with its location and direction in social space-its geometry. Here I Illustrate pure sociology with formulations about the behavior of ideas, including a theory of scienticity that predicts and explains the degree to which an idea is likely (...)
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  19. Susan Blackmore, Published in Skeptical Inquirer 1991, 15, 362-370.
    What could it mean to be conscious in your dreams? For most of us, dreaming is something quite separate from normal life. When we wake up from being chased by a ferocious tiger, or seduced by a devastatingly good-looking Nobel Prize winner we realize with relief or disappointment that "it was only a dream.".
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  20. M. Blagrove (2007). Personality and Dreaming. In D. Barrett & P. McNamara (eds.), The New Science of Dreaming. Praeger Publishers 2--115.
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  21. M. Blagrove, S. Blakemore & B. Thayer (2006). The Ability to Self-Tickle Following Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Dreaming. Consciousness and Cognition 15 (2):285-294.
    Self-produced tactile stimulation usually feels less tickly—is perceptually attenuated—relative to the same stimulation produced externally. This is not true, however, for individuals with schizophrenia. Here, we investigate whether the lack of attenuation to self-produced stimuli seen in schizophrenia also occurs for normal participants following REM dreams. Fourteen participants were stimulated on their left palm with a tactile stimulation device which allowed the same stimulus to be generated by the participant or by the experimenter. The level of self-tickling attenuation did not (...)
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  22. Mark Blagrove (2000). Dreams Have Meaning but No Function. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (6):910-911.
    Solms shows the cortical basis for why dreams reflect waking concerns and goals, but with deficient volition. I argue the latter relates to Hobson et al.'s process I as well as M. A memory function for REM sleep is possible, but may be irrelevant to dream characteristics, which, contrary to Revonsuo, mirror the range of waking emotions, positive and negative. [Hobson et al.; Nielsen; Solms; Revonsuo; Vertes & Eastman].
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  23. Mark Blagrove (1996). Problems with the Cognitive Psychological Modeling of Dreaming. Journal of Mind and Behavior 17 (2):99-134.
    It is frequently assumed that dreaming can be likened to such waking cognitive activities as imagination, analogical reasoning, and creativity, and that these models can then be used to explain instances of problem solving during dreams. This paper emphasizes instead the lack of reflexivity and intentionality within dreams, which undermines their characterization as analogs of the waking world, and opposes claims that dreams can complement and aid waking world problem solving. The importance of reflexivity in imagination, in analogical reasoning and (...)
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  24. Mark Blagrove, Josie Henley-Einion, Amanda Barnett, Darren Edwards & C. Heidi Seage (2011). A Replication of the 5–7day Dream-Lag Effect with Comparison of Dreams to Future Events as Control for Baseline Matching. [REVIEW] Consciousness and Cognition 20 (2):384-391.
    The dream-lag effect refers to there being, after the frequent incorporation of memory elements from the previous day into dreams , a lower incorporation of memory elements from 2 to 4 days before the dream, but then an increased incorporation of memory elements from 5 to 7 days before the dream. Participants kept a daily diary and a dream diary for 14 days and then rated the level of matching between every dream report and every daily diary record. Baseline matching (...)
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  25. Harold Bloom (1997). Book Review: Omens of the Millennium: The Gnosis of Angels, Dreams, and Resurrection. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Literature 21 (2).
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  26. John Bodnar (2010). Memory. Bad Dreams About the Good War : Bataan. In Greg Dickinson, Carole Blair & Brian L. Ott (eds.), Places of Public Memory: The Rhetoric of Museums and Memorials. University of Alabama Press
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  27. Lawrence A. Boland (2006). On Reviewing Machine Dreams : Zoomed-in Versus Zoomed-Out. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 36 (4):480-495.
    continues to receive many reviews. Judging by recent reviews, this is a very controversial book. The question considered here is, how can one fairly review a controversial book—particularly when the book is widely popular and, for a history of economic thought book, a best seller? This essay uses Mirowski’s book as a case study to propose one answer for this question. In the process, it will examine how others seem to have answered this question. Key Words: methodology • reviews • (...)
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  28. Therese Bonin (1990). On the Supreme Good; On the Eternity of the World; On Dreams. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 64 (2):290-291.
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  29. Alexander A. Borbély & Lutz Wittmann (2000). Sleep, Not Rem Sleep, is the Royal Road to Dreams. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (6):911-912.
    The advent of functional imaging has reinforced the attempts to define dreaming as a sleep state-dependent phenomenon. PET scans revealed major differences between nonREM sleep and REM sleep. However, because dreaming occurs throughout sleep, the common features of the two sleep states, rather than the differences, could help define the prerequisite for the occurrence of dreams. [Hobson et al.; Nielsen; Solms; Revonsuo; Vertes & Eastman].
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  30. E. K. Borthwick (1978). Naphtali Lewis: The Interpretation of Dreams and Portents. (Aspects of Antiquity.) Pp. Xi + 167. Toronto and Sarasota: Stevens & Hakkert, 1976. Cloth, $9 (Paper, $3.5O). [REVIEW] The Classical Review 28 (02):386-.
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  31. E. K. Borthwick (1978). 'Such Stuff as Dreams Are Made On' Robert J. White: The Interpretation of Dreams: Oneirocritica by Artemidorus. Translation and Commentary. Pp. 259. New Jersey: Noyes Press, 1975. Cloth, $ 15. Dario Del Corno: Artemidoro, Il Libro Dei Sogni. Pp. Lviii + 366. Milan: Adelphi Edizioni, 1975. Paper, L.6,000. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 28 (01):22-23.
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  32. Robert Botkin (1972). What Can We Do When Dreaming? A Reply to Professor Davis. Southern Journal of Philosophy 10 (3):367-372.
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  33. Robert Botkin (1972). What Can We Do When Dreaming? Southern Journal of Philosophy 10 (3):367-372.
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  34. George Botterill (2008). The Internal Problem of Dreaming: Detection and Epistemic Risk. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 16 (2):139 – 160.
    There are two epistemological problems connected with dreaming, which are of different kinds and require different treatment. The internal problem is best seen as a problem of rational consistency, of how we can maintain all of: Dreams are experiences we have during sleep. Dream-experiences are sufficiently similar to waking experiences for the subject to be able to mistake them for waking experiences. We can tell that we are awake. (1)-(3) threaten to violate a requirement on discrimination: that we can only (...)
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  35. Thorsten Botz-Bornstein (2007). Dreams in Buddhism and Western Aesthetics: Some Thoughts on Play, Style and Space. Asian Philosophy 17 (1):65 – 81.
    Several Buddhist schools in India, China and Japan concentrate on the interrelationships between waking and dreaming consciousness. In Eastern philosophy, reality can be seen as a dream and an obscure 'reality beyond' can be considered as real. In spite of the overwhelming Platonic-Aristotelian-Freudian influence existent in Western culture, some Western thinkers and artists - Valéry, Baudelaire, and Schnitzler, for example - have been fascinated by a kind of 'simple presence' contained in dreams. I show that this has consequences for a (...)
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  36. Thorsten Botz-Bornstein (2003). The Dream of Language: Wittgenstein's Concept of Dreams in the Context of Style and Lebensform. Philosophical Forum 34 (1):73-89.
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  37. Thorsten Botz-Borstein (2004). Virtual Reality and Dreams. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 11 (2):1-10.
    The virtual annuls all suspension of time that could, through its tragic or stylistic character, confer to time an existential value. This condition is contrasted with time as it functions in dreams. On the grounds of these observations it is shown that there are resemblances between “autistic” symptoms and the virtual world.
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  38. Thorsten Botz–Bornstein (2003). The Dream of Language: Wittgenstein's Concept of Dreams in the Context of Style and Lebensform. Philosophical Forum 34 (1):73–89.
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  39. C. Bouchet (1995). Psychoanalysis and the Interpretation of Lucid Dreams. Diogenes 43 (170):109-126.
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  40. Alice Browne (1981). Dreams and Picture-Writing: Some Examples of This Comparison From the Sixteenth to the Eighteenth Century. Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 44:90-100.
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  41. Alice Browne (1977). Descartes's Dreams. Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 40:256-273.
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  42. P. Brugger (2008). The Phantom Limb in Dreams☆. Consciousness and Cognition 17 (4):1272-1278.
    Mulder and colleagues [Mulder, T., Hochstenbach, J., Dijkstra, P. U., Geertzen, J. H. B. . Born to adapt, but not in your dreams. Consciousness and Cognition, 17, 1266–1271.] report that a majority of amputees continue to experience a normally-limbed body during their night dreams. They interprete this observation as a failure of the body schema to adapt to the new body shape. The present note does not question this interpretation, but points to the already existing literature on the phenomenology of (...)
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  43. K. BulKeley & T. Kahan (2008). The Impact of September 11 on Dreaming☆. Consciousness and Cognition 17 (4):1248-1256.
    This study focuses on a set of dreams related to the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks and their aftermath, using content analysis and cognitive psychology to explore the interweaving of external public catastrophe and internal psychological processes. The study tests several recent claims in contemporary dream research, including the central image theory of Hartmann [Hartmann, E., & Basile, R. . Dream imagery becomes more intense after 9/11/01. Dreaming, 13, 61–66; Hartmann, E., & Brezler, T. . A systematic change in dreams (...)
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  44. Kelly Bulkeley (2007). Sacred Sleep: Scientific Contributions to the Study of Religiously Significant Dreaming. In D. Barrett & P. McNamara (eds.), The New Science of Dreaming. Praeger Publishers 3--71.
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  45. Alan Bundy (1987). AI Bridges and Dreams. AI and Society 1 (1):62-71.
  46. Robert L. Caldwell (1965). Malcolm and the Criterion of Sleep. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 43 (December):339-352.
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  47. Brian Cantwell Smith (1965). Dreaming. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 43 (May):48-57.
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  48. James D. Carney (1960). Book Review:Dreaming Norman Malcolm. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 27 (4):414-.
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  49. Terry Carney, Fleur Aileen Beaupert, Julia Perry & David Tait, Advocacy and Participation in Mental Health Cases: Realisable Rights or Pipe-Dreams?
    This article discusses Australian experiences of mental health clients, legal advocates and other stakeholders in the mental health review system. We review forms of advocacy, the reactions to these, and the contribution lawyers make to protecting rights within this field. Based on our fieldwork we suggest a mixed model of advocacy, one that includes legal representation that goes beyond simple 'following instructions', but also self-advocacy, systemic advocacy and mobilisation of support networks. We suggest that Jan Brakel was right to recently (...)
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  50. Jacqueline Carroy (2006). Dreaming Scientists and Scientific Dreamers: Freud as a Reader of French Dream Literature. Science in Context 19 (1):15.
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