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  1. Linda Alcoff (2008). Dreaming of Iris. Philosophy Today 52 (Supplement):4-9.
    This paper provides a memoir and overview of Iris Young's philosophy and a discussion of her account of gender identity.
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  2. Fernando Andacht (2001). Those Powerful Materialized Dreams: Peirce on Icons and the Human Imagination. American Journal of Semiotics 17 (3):91-116.
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  3. Jose Maria Ariso, The Error of Thinking That the Picture of Actual Dreams Can Be Used in Only One Way.
    In 1914, the Spanish novelist, dramatist, poet and philosopher Miguel de Unamuno published one of his well-known works, Niebla. Unamuno allows that his characters speak and speak although they say nothing at all: in this way the author begins believing he takes his characters by the hand, but in the end becomes his characters´ fiction. And not only does Unamuno give free rein to his characters´ dialogues but describes thoughts and feelings in great detail too; as a matter of fact, (...)
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  4. Susan E. Babbitt (1996). Impossible Dreams: Rationality, Integrity, and Moral Imagination. Westview Press.
    Conventional wisdom and commonsense morality tend to take the integrity of persons for granted. But for people in systematically unjust societies, self-respect and human dignity may prove to be impossible dreams.Susan Babbitt explores the implications of this insight, arguing that in the face of systemic injustice, individual and social rationality may require the transformation rather than the realization of deep-seated aims, interests, and values. In particular, under such conditions, she argues, the cultivation and ongoing exercise of moral imagination is necessary (...)
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  5. M. J. Baker (1954). Sleeping and Waking. Mind 63 (October):539-543.
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  6. Colette Jane Balmain, Genre, Gender, Giallo: The Disturbed Dreams of Dario Argento.
    This thesis presents an examination of the giallo films of Dario Argento from his directorial debut The Bird with the Crystal Plumage to The Stendhal Syndrome'. In opposition to the dominant psychoanalytical approaches to the horror film generally and Argento's giallo specifically, this thesis argues that the giallo, both textually and meta-textually, actively resists oedipalisation. Taking up from Deleuze's contention in Cinema 1: The Movement Image that the cinematic-image can be consider the equivalent to a philosophical concept, I suggest that (...)
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  7. V. Barnard (2011). Dreaming: A Recovery Story. Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 1 (1):3-4.
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  8. Christian Beenfeldt (2008). A Wake Up Call—or More Sweet Slumber? A Review of Daniel Dennett's Sweet Dreams: Philosophical Obstacles to a Science of Consciousness. Think 7 (19):85-92.
    Beenfeldt assesses Dennett's approach to the philosophical problem of consciousness.
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  9. Donald Black (2000). Dreams of Pure Sociology. Sociological Theory 18 (3):343-367.
    Unlike older sciences such as physics and biology, sociology has never had a revolution. Modern sociology is still classical-largely psychological, teleological, and individualistic-and even less scientific than classical sociology. But pure sociology is different: It predicts and explains the behavior of social life with its location and direction in social space-its geometry. Here I Illustrate pure sociology with formulations about the behavior of ideas, including a theory of scienticity that predicts and explains the degree to which an idea is likely (...)
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  10. M. Blagrove (2007). Personality and Dreaming. In D. Barrett & P. McNamara (eds.), The New Science of Dreaming. Praeger Publishers 2--115.
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  11. Mark Blagrove, Josie Henley-Einion, Amanda Barnett, Darren Edwards & C. Heidi Seage (2011). A Replication of the 5–7day Dream-Lag Effect with Comparison of Dreams to Future Events as Control for Baseline Matching. [REVIEW] Consciousness and Cognition 20 (2):384-391.
    The dream-lag effect refers to there being, after the frequent incorporation of memory elements from the previous day into dreams , a lower incorporation of memory elements from 2 to 4 days before the dream, but then an increased incorporation of memory elements from 5 to 7 days before the dream. Participants kept a daily diary and a dream diary for 14 days and then rated the level of matching between every dream report and every daily diary record. Baseline matching (...)
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  12. Harold Bloom (1997). Book Review: Omens of the Millennium: The Gnosis of Angels, Dreams, and Resurrection. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Literature 21 (2).
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  13. John Bodnar (2010). Memory. Bad Dreams About the Good War : Bataan. In Greg Dickinson, Carole Blair & Brian L. Ott (eds.), Places of Public Memory: The Rhetoric of Museums and Memorials. University of Alabama Press
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  14. Lawrence A. Boland (2006). On Reviewing Machine Dreams : Zoomed-in Versus Zoomed-Out. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 36 (4):480-495.
    continues to receive many reviews. Judging by recent reviews, this is a very controversial book. The question considered here is, how can one fairly review a controversial book—particularly when the book is widely popular and, for a history of economic thought book, a best seller? This essay uses Mirowski’s book as a case study to propose one answer for this question. In the process, it will examine how others seem to have answered this question. Key Words: methodology • reviews • (...)
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  15. Therese Bonin (1990). On the Supreme Good; On the Eternity of the World; On Dreams. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 64 (2):290-291.
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  16. E. K. Borthwick (1978). 'Such Stuff as Dreams Are Made On' Robert J. White: The Interpretation of Dreams: Oneirocritica by Artemidorus. Translation and Commentary. Pp. 259. New Jersey: Noyes Press, 1975. Cloth, $ 15. Dario Del Corno: Artemidoro, Il Libro Dei Sogni. Pp. Lviii + 366. Milan: Adelphi Edizioni, 1975. Paper, L.6,000. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 28 (01):22-23.
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  17. Thorsten Botz-Bornstein (2007). Dreams in Buddhism and Western Aesthetics: Some Thoughts on Play, Style and Space. Asian Philosophy 17 (1):65 – 81.
    Several Buddhist schools in India, China and Japan concentrate on the interrelationships between waking and dreaming consciousness. In Eastern philosophy, reality can be seen as a dream and an obscure 'reality beyond' can be considered as real. In spite of the overwhelming Platonic-Aristotelian-Freudian influence existent in Western culture, some Western thinkers and artists - Valéry, Baudelaire, and Schnitzler, for example - have been fascinated by a kind of 'simple presence' contained in dreams. I show that this has consequences for a (...)
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  18. Thorsten Botz-Bornstein (2003). The Dream of Language: Wittgenstein's Concept of Dreams in the Context of Style and Lebensform. Philosophical Forum 34 (1):73-89.
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  19. Thorsten Botz–Bornstein (2003). The Dream of Language: Wittgenstein's Concept of Dreams in the Context of Style and Lebensform. Philosophical Forum 34 (1):73–89.
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  20. Alice Browne (1981). Dreams and Picture-Writing: Some Examples of This Comparison From the Sixteenth to the Eighteenth Century. Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 44:90-100.
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  21. Kelly Bulkeley (2007). Sacred Sleep: Scientific Contributions to the Study of Religiously Significant Dreaming. In D. Barrett & P. McNamara (eds.), The New Science of Dreaming. Praeger Publishers 3--71.
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  22. Alan Bundy (1987). AI Bridges and Dreams. AI and Society 1 (1):62-71.
  23. James D. Carney (1960). Book Review:Dreaming Norman Malcolm. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 27 (4):414-.
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  24. Terry Carney, Fleur Aileen Beaupert, Julia Perry & David Tait, Advocacy and Participation in Mental Health Cases: Realisable Rights or Pipe-Dreams?
    This article discusses Australian experiences of mental health clients, legal advocates and other stakeholders in the mental health review system. We review forms of advocacy, the reactions to these, and the contribution lawyers make to protecting rights within this field. Based on our fieldwork we suggest a mixed model of advocacy, one that includes legal representation that goes beyond simple 'following instructions', but also self-advocacy, systemic advocacy and mobilisation of support networks. We suggest that Jan Brakel was right to recently (...)
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  25. Jacqueline Carroy (2006). Dreaming Scientists and Scientific Dreamers: Freud as a Reader of French Dream Literature. Science in Context 19 (1):15.
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  26. Yu Chang (2010). The Spirit of the School of Principles in Zhu XI's Discussion of “Dreams”—and on “Confucius Did Not Dream of Duke Zhou”. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 5 (1):94-110.
    Dreams were a topic of study even in ancient times, and they are a special spiritual phenomenon. Generations of literati have defined the meaning of dreams in their own way, while Zhu Xi was perhaps the most outstanding one among them. He made profound explanations of dreams from aspects such as the relationship between dreams and the principles li and qi, the relationship between dreams and the state of the heart, and the relationship between dreams and an individual’s moral improvement. (...)
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  27. William Child (2009). Wittgenstein, Dreaming and Anti-Realism: A Reply to Richard Scheer. Philosophical Investigations 32 (4):329-337.
    I have argued that Wittgenstein's treatment of dreaming involves a kind of anti-realism about the past: what makes "I dreamed p " true is, roughly, that I wake with the feeling or impression of having dreamed p . Richard Scheer raises three objections. First, that the texts do not support my interpretation. Second, that the anti-realist view of dreaming does not make sense, so cannot be Wittgenstein's view. Third, that the anti-realist view leaves it a mystery why someone who reports (...)
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  28. William Child (2007). Dreaming, Calculating, Thinking: Wittgenstein and Anti-Realism About the Past. Philosophical Quarterly 57 (227):252–272.
    For the anti-realist, the truth about a subject's past thoughts and attitudes is determined by what he is subsequently disposed to judge about them. The argument for an anti-realist interpretation of Wittgenstein's view of past-tense statements seems plausible in three cases: dreams, calculating in the head, and thinking. Wittgenstein is indeed an anti-realist about dreaming. His account of calculating in the head suggests anti-realism about the past, but turns out to be essentially realistic. He does not endorse general anti-realism about (...)
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  29. Noam Chomsky, Vain Hopes, False Dreams.
    At times of general malaise and social breakdown, it is not uncommon for millenarian movements to arise to replace lost hopes by idle dreams: dreams of a savior who will lead us from bondage, or of the return of the great ships with their bounty, as in the cargo cults of South Sea islanders. Some may yearn for a lost golden age, or succumb to the blandishments of the new Messiahs who come to the fore at such moments. Those more (...)
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  30. Hélène Cixous (2006). Dream I Tell You. Columbia University Press.
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  31. G. Clark (1996). P.C. Miller: Dreaming in Late Antiquity. Studies in the Imagination of a Culture. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1994. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 46 (1):85-86.
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  32. Wilson O. Clough (1960). Ur-Dream. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 41 (3):341.
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  33. R. Conduit, S. Crewther & G. Coleman (2004). Poor Recall of Eye-Movement Signals From Stage 2 Compared to REM Sleep: Implications for Models of Dreaming. Consciousness and Cognition 13 (3):484-500.
    An ongoing assumption made by sleep researchers is that since dreams are more often recalled on awakening from rapid eye movement sleep, dreams must occur more often during this stage of sleep. An alternative hypothesis is that cognition occurs throughout sleep, but the recall of this mentation differs on awakening. When a dream is not reported on awakening, there is no method of establishing whether it did not happen or was forgotten. The aim of the present study was to investigate (...)
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  34. Edward William Cox (1878). A Monograph on Sleep and Dream: Their Physiology and Psychology.
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  35. Anna Crabbe (1978). Such Stuff as Dreams Are Made on Atrick Kragelund: Dream and Prediction in the Aeneid: A Semiotic Interpretation of the Dreams of Aeneas and Turnus. (Opuscula Graecolatina 7.) Pp. 91. Copenhagen: Museum Tusculanum, 1976. Paper. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 28 (02):249-251.
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  36. Edwin M. Curley (1978). 3. Dreaming. In Descartes Against the Skeptics. Harvard University Press 46-69.
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  37. Edwin M. Curley (1975). Dreaming and Conceptual Revision. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 53 (August):119-41.
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  38. Robert Curry (1974). Films and Dreams. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 33 (1):83-89.
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  39. Thien Thanh Dang Vu, Manuel Schabus, Martin Desseilles, Sophie Schwartz & Pierre Maquet (2007). Neuroimaging of REM Sleep and Dreaming. In D. Barrett & P. McNamara (eds.), The New Science of Dreaming. Praeger Publishers
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  40. Edward Davenport (1990). Review Essays : Dreams and Nightmares Technology in 3-D. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 20 (1):110-126.
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  41. Ralph Davis (1972). Dreams and Dreaming: A Reply to Professor Botkin. Southern Journal of Philosophy 10 (3):373-378.
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  42. Claude Debru (2004). Le Rêve: Aspects Épistémologiques. Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 194 (3):331 - 337.
    L'article examine les recherches sur le sommeil paradoxal et le rêve depuis une cinquantaine d'années. II compare les approches psychophysiologiques et neurophysiologiques mises en œuvre aux États-Unis (Kleitman et Dement) et en France (Jouvet) pour l'etude des corrélats cérébraux de l'expérience mentale du rêve. On montre comment des données récentes ont permis de consolider l'association entre rêve proprement dit et certains états d'activation corticale au cours du sommeil. The paper examines research, on paradoxical sleep and on dream for the past (...)
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  43. Fpa Demeterio (2009). Dreaming with a Hammer: On Critical Theory in the Philippines (A Philosophical Fiction). Kritike: An Online Journal of Philosophy 3 (1):185-206.
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  44. Daniel C. Dennett (2005). Sweet Dreams: Philosophical Obstacles to a Science of Consciousness. MIT Press.
    In the final essay, the "intrinsic" nature of "qualia" is compared with the naively imagined "intrinsic value" of a dollar in ...
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  45. Sophie Desjardins & Antonio Zadra (2006). Is the Threat Simulation Theory Threatened by Recurrent Dreams? Consciousness and Cognition 15 (2):470-474.
    Zadra, Desjardins, and Marcotte tested several predictions derived from the Threat Simulation Theory of dreaming in a large sample of recurrent dreams. In response to these findings, Valli and Revonsuo presented a commentary outlining alternate conceptualizations and explanations for the results obtained. We argue that many points raised by Valli and Revonsuo do not accurately reflect our main findings and at times present a biased assessment of the data. In this article, we provide necessary clarifications and responses to each one (...)
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  46. James Diggle (1978). The Interpretation of Dreams George Devereux: Dreams in Greek Tragedy: An Etnnopsycho-Analytical Study. Pp. Xxxix + 365; Frontispiece. Oxford: Basil Blackwell, 1976. Cloth, £12. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 28 (02):226-228.
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  47. Ilham Dilman (1961). Dreams. Review of Metaphysics 15 (1):108 - 117.
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  48. Fabrizio Doricchi & Cristiano Violani (2000). Mesolimbic Dopamine and the Neuropsychology of Dreaming: Some Caution and Reconsiderations. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (6):930-931.
    New findings point to a role for mesolimbic DA circuits in the generation of dreaming. We disagree with Solms about these structures having an exclusive role in generating dreams. We review data suggesting that dreaming can be interrupted at different levels of processing and that anterior-subcortical lesions associated with dream cessation are unlikely to produce selective hypodopaminergic dynamic impairments. [Hobson et al.; Nielsen; Solms].
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  49. Ken Dowden (1982). R. G. A. Van Lieshout: Greeks on Dreams. Pp. Viii + 280. Utrecht: H. & S. Publishers, 1980. Paper, Fl. 70. The Classical Review 32 (02):282-.
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  50. I. Duchhart (2003). Dreaming of Africa. Topos: Periodiek Lab. Ruimtelijke Planvorming 13.
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