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  1. Yanquiel Barrios Hernández & Alejandro David González López (2012). La atención psicoterapéutica en el ámbito de las adicciones: Una reflexión desde la ética profesional. Humanidades Médicas 12 (2):192-202.
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  2. LeClair Bissell (1994). Ethics for Addiction Professionals. Hazelden.
    This trailblazing book provides a comprehensive view of the ethical issues that cut across the addiction field, from Employee Assistance Programs to treatment and aftercare. By addressing probing questions that illuminate today's complex ethical landscape, LeClair Bissell and James Royce explore how standard guidelines for professional conduct benefit counselors and clients alike.
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  3. Daniel Buchman & Peter Reiner (2009). Stigma and Addiction: Being and Becoming. American Journal of Bioethics 9 (9):18-19.
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  4. Adrian Carter, Emily Bell, Eric Racine & Wayne Hall (2011). Ethical Issues Raised by Proposals to Treat Addiction Using Deep Brain Stimulation. Neuroethics 4 (2):129-142.
    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been proposed as a potential treatment of drug addiction on the basis of its effects on drug self-administration in animals and on addictive behaviours in some humans treated with DBS for other psychiatric or neurological conditions. DBS is seen as a more reversible intervention than ablative neurosurgery but it is nonetheless a treatment that carries significant risks. A review of preclinical and clinical evidence for the use of DBS to treat addiction suggests that more animal (...)
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  5. Peter J. Cohen (2002). Untreated Addiction Imposes an Ethical Bar to Recruiting Addicts for Non-Therapeutic Studies of Addictive Drugs. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 30 (1):73-81.
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  6. Ezio Di Nucci (2013). Addiction, Compulsion, and Agency. Neuroethics (1):1-3.
    I show that Pickard’s argument against the irresistibility of addiction fails because her proposed dilemma, according to which either drug-seeking does not count as action or addiction is resistible, is flawed; and that is the case whether or not one endorses Pickard’s controversial definition of action. Briefly, we can easily imagine cases in which drug-seeking meets Pickard’s conditions for agency without thereby implying that the addiction was not irresistible, as when the drug addict may take more than one route to (...)
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  7. Brendan Dill & Richard Holton (2014). The Addict in Us All. Frontiers in Psychiatry 5 (139):01-20.
    In this paper, we contend that the psychology of addiction is similar to the psychology of ordinary, non-addictive temptation in important respects, and explore the ways in which these parallels can illuminate both addiction and ordinary action. The incentive salience account of addiction proposed by Robinson and Berridge (1993; 2001; 2008) entails that addictive desires are not in their nature different from many of the desires had by non-addicts; what is different is rather the way that addictive desires are acquired, (...)
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  8. Scott Dunbar (1988). Alcoholics Anonymous and Alcohol Dependency. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 4 (2):17-29.
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  9. Lisa Eckenwiler (2004). Why Not Retribution? The Particularized Imagination and Justice for Pregnant Addicts. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 32 (1):89-99.
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  10. Russell Eisenman (2010). Addictions. Journal of Information Ethics 19 (1):7-11.
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  11. David S. Festinger, Kattiya Ratanadilok, Douglas B. Marlowe, Karen L. Dugosh, Nicholas S. Patapis & David S. DeMatteo (2007). Neuropsychological Functioning and Recall of Research Consent Information Among Drug Court Clients. Ethics and Behavior 17 (2):163 – 186.
    Evidence suggests that research participants often fail to recall much of the information provided during the informed consent process. This study was conducted to determine the proportion of consent information recalled by drug court participants following a structured informed consent procedure and the neuropsychological factors that were related to recall. Eighty-five participants completed a standard informed consent procedure to participate in an ongoing research study, followed by a 17-item consent quiz and a brief neuropsychological battery 2 weeks later. Participants performed (...)
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  12. Kevin Fiscella, Naomi Pless, Sean Meldrum & Paul Fiscella (2004). Benign Neglect or Neglected Abuse Drug and Alcohol Withdrawal in U.S. Jails. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 32 (1):129-136.
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  13. Bennett Foddy (2011). Addicted to Food, Hungry for Drugs. Neuroethics 4 (2):79-89.
    There is a growing consensus among neuroscientists that people can become addicted to food, and that at least some cases of obesity have addiction as their cause. By contrast, the rest of the world continues to see obesity as either a disease of the metabolism, or as a reckless case of self-harm. Among obesity researchers, there has been a lively debate on the issue of whether obesity ought to be considered a disease. Few researchers, however, have suggested that obesity is (...)
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  14. Cynthia M. A. Geppert & Laura Weiss Roberts (eds.) (2008). The Book of Ethics: Expert Guidance for Professionals Who Treat Addiction. Hazelden.
    The definitive book on ethics for chemical dependency treatment professionals.
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  15. Abigail Gosselin (forthcoming). Addiction Narratives: Background Assumptions and Policy Implications. Social Philosophy Today.
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  16. Abigail Gosselin (2012). Addiction Narratives. Social Philosophy Today 28:47-66.
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  17. Carl L. Hart & Robert M. Krauss (2008). Human Drug Addiction is More Than Faulty Decision-Making. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (4):448-449.
    We commend Redish et al. for the progress they have made in bringing a measure of theoretical order to the processes that underlie drug addiction. However, incorporating information about situations in which drug users do not exhibit faulty decision-making into the theory would greatly enhance its generality and practical value. This commentary draws attention to the relevant human substance abuse literature.
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  18. Janna Hastings, Nicolas Le Novère, Werner Ceusters, Kevin Mulligan & Barry Smith (2012). Wanting What We Don’T Want to Want: Representing Addiction in Interoperable Bio-Ontologies. In Proceeedings of the Third International Conference on Biomedical Ontology. CEUR.
    Ontologies are being developed throughout the biomedical sciences to address standardization, integration, classification and reasoning needs against the background of an increasingly data-driven research paradigm. In particular, ontologies facilitate the translation of basic research into benefits for the patient by making research results more discoverable and by facilitating knowledge transfer across disciplinary boundaries. Addressing and adequately treating mental illness is one of our most pressing public health challenges. Primary research across multiple disciplines such as psychology, psychiatry, biology, neuroscience and pharmacology (...)
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  19. Janna Hastings, Nicolas Le Novère, Werner Ceusters, Kevin Mulligan & Barry Smith (2012). Wanting What We Don’T Want to Want: Representing Addiction in Interoperable Bio-Ontologies. In Proceeedings of the Third International Conference on Biomedical Ontology. CEUR.
    Ontologies are being developed throughout the biomedical sciences to address standardization, integration, classification and reasoning needs against the background of an increasingly data-driven research paradigm. In particular, ontologies facilitate the translation of basic research into benefits for the patient by making research results more discoverable and by facilitating knowledge transfer across disciplinary boundaries. Addressing and adequately treating mental illness is one of our most pressing public health challenges. Primary research across multiple disciplines such as psychology, psychiatry, biology, neuroscience and pharmacology (...)
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  20. Edmund Henden (2013). Heroin Addiction and Voluntary Choice: The Case of Informed Consent. Bioethics 27 (7):395-401.
    Does addiction to heroin undermine the voluntariness of heroin addicts' consent to take part in research which involves giving them free and legal heroin? This question has been raised in connection with research into the effectiveness of heroin prescription as a way of treating dependent heroin users. Participants in such research are required to give their informed consent to take part. Louis C. Charland has argued that we should not presume that heroin addicts are competent to do this since heroin (...)
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  21. Edmund Henden & Bærøe Kristine (2014). Providing Free Heroin to Addicts Participating in Research - Ethical Concerns and the Question of Voluntariness. The Psychiatric Bulletin 38 (4):1-4.
    Providing heroin to heroin addicts taking part in medical trials to assess the effectiveness of the drug as a treatment alternative, breaches ethical research standards, some ethicists maintain. Heroin addicts, they say, are unable to consent voluntarily to take part in these trials. Other ethicists disagree. In our view, both sides of the debate have an inadequate understanding of voluntariness. In this article we therefore offer a fuller conception, one which allows for a more flexible, case-to-case approach in which some (...)
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  22. Joanna G. Katzman & Cynthia M. A. Geppert (2008). Ethical Dilemmas in Treating Chronic Pain in the Context of Addiction. In Cynthia M. A. Geppert & Laura Weiss Roberts (eds.), The Book of Ethics: Expert Guidance for Professionals Who Treat Addiction. Hazelden.
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  23. Neil Levy (2014). Addiction as a Disorder of Belief. Biology and Philosophy 29 (3):337-355.
    Addiction is almost universally held to be characterized by a loss of control over drug-seeking and consuming behavior. But the actions of addicts, even of those who seem to want to abstain from drugs, seem to be guided by reasons. In this paper, I argue that we can explain this fact, consistent with continuing to maintain that addiction involves a loss of control, by understanding addiction as involving an oscillation between conflicting judgments. I argue that the dysfunction of the mesolimbic (...)
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  24. Neil Levy (2006). Autonomy and Addiction. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 36 (3):427-447.
  25. Neil Levy (2003). Self-Deception and Responsibility for Addiction. Journal of Applied Philosophy 20 (2):133–142.
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  26. Clayton Neighbors, Eric R. Pedersen, Debra Kaysen, Magdalena Kulesza & Theresa Walter (2011). What Should We Do When Participants Report Dangerous Drinking? The Impact of Personalized Letters Versus General Pamphlets as a Function of Sex and Controlled Orientation. Ethics and Behavior 22 (1):1 - 15.
    Research in which participants report potentially dangerous health-related behaviors raises ethical and professional questions about what to do with that information. Policies and laws regarding reportable behaviors vary across states and Institutional Review Boards (IRB). In alcohol research, IRBs often require researchers to respond to participants who report dangerous drinking practices. Researchers have little guidance regarding how best to respond in such cases. Personalized feedback or general nonpersonalized information may prove differentially effective as a function of gender and/or level of (...)
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  27. Christian Perring (2002). Resisting the Temptations of Addiction Rhetoric. American Journal of Bioethics 2 (2):51-52.
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  28. John Sarnecki, Rebecca Traynor & Michael Clune (2008). Cue Fascination: A New Vulnerability in Drug Addiction. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (4):458-459.
    Redish et al. propose a constellation of vulnerabilities inherent in the brain's decision-making system. They allow over-attention to cues a minor role in drug addiction. We think this is inadequate. Using the established links among drug cues, dopamine, and novelty, we propose a fuller account of this key feature of addiction, which we call the phenomenon of cue fascination.
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  29. Sidney H. Schnoll & James Finch (1994). Medical Education for Pain and Addiction: Making Progress Toward Answering a Need. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 22 (3):252-256.
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  30. Kirk Torgensen, D. Chris Buttars, Seth W. Norman & Stephanie Bailey (2004). How Drug Courts Reduce Substance Abuse Recidivism. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 32 (s4):69-72.
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  31. Scott Vrecko (2010). Birth of a Brain Disease: Science, the State and Addiction Neuropolitics. History of the Human Sciences 23 (4):52-67.
    This article critically interrogates contemporary forms of addiction medicine that are portrayed by policy-makers as providing a ‘rational’ or politically neutral approach to dealing with drug use and related social problems. In particular, it examines the historical origins of the biological facts that are today understood to provide a foundation for contemporary understandings of addiction as a ‘disease of the brain’. Drawing upon classic and contemporary work on ‘styles of thought’, it documents how, in the period between the mid-1960s and (...)
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  32. Mary Jean Walker (2010). Addiction and Self-Deception: A Method for Self-Control? Journal of Applied Philosophy 27 (3):305-319.
    Neil Levy argues that while addicts who believe they are not addicts are self-deceived, addicts who believe they are addicts are just as self-deceived. Such persons accept a false belief that their addictive behaviour involves a loss of control. This paper examines two implications of Levy's discussion: that accurate self-knowledge may be particularly difficult for addicts; and that an addict's self-deceived belief that they cannot control themselves may aid their attempts at self-control. I argue that the self-deceived beliefs of addicts (...)
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