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Dualism

Edited by Andreas Elpidorou (University of Louisville)
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Interactionism
  1. Laird Addis (1984). Parallelism, Interactionism, and Causation. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 9 (1):329-344.
    One may gather from the arguments of two of the last papers published before his death that J. L. Mackie held the following three theses concerning the mind/body problem : (1) There is a distinct realm of mental properties, so a dualism of properties at least is true and materialism false.
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  2. Kristoffer Ahlstrom (2010). What Descartes Did Not Know. Journal of Value Inquiry 44 (3):297-311.
    Descartes’ epistemologies of meditation and sense imply that we cannot know anything about the mind-body union, either in the Cartesian sense of having scientia or, more interestingly, in terms of any other concept of knowledge available to Descartes. After considering the implications of this conclusion for what we may know about mind-body interaction, it becomes clear that, on Descartes’ view, we at best can be said to know that mind-body interaction, if it does in fact take place, does not violate (...)
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  3. Edward W. Averill & Bernard Keating (1981). Does Interactionism Violate a Law of Classical Physics? Mind 90 (January):102-7.
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  4. Andrew M. Bailey, Joshua Rasmussen & Luke van Horn (2011). No Pairing Problem. Philosophical Studies 154 (3):349-360.
    Many have thought that there is a problem with causal commerce between immaterial souls and material bodies. In Physicalism or Something Near Enough, Jaegwon Kim attempts to spell out that problem. Rather than merely posing a question or raising a mystery for defenders of substance dualism to answer or address, he offers a compelling argument for the conclusion that immaterial souls cannot causally interact with material bodies. We offer a reconstruction of that argument that hinges on two premises: Kim’s Dictum (...)
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  5. Alexander Batthyany & Avshalom C. Elitzur (eds.) (2009). Irreducibly Conscious. Selected Papers on Consciousness. Winter.
  6. John Beloff (1994). Minds and Machines: A Radical Dualist Perspective. Journal of Consciousness Studies 1 (1):32-37.
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  7. John Beloff (1976). Mind-Body Interactionism in Light of the Parapsychological Evidence. Theoria to Theory 10 (May):125-37.
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  8. Kieran Bonner (1994). Hermeneutics and Symbolic Interactionism: The Problem of Solipsism. [REVIEW] Human Studies 17 (2):225 - 249.
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  9. John Bricke (1975). Interaction and Physiology. Mind 84 (April):255-9.
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  10. May Brodbeck (1966). Objectivism and Interaction: A Reaction to Margolis. Philosophy of Science 33 (September):287-292.
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  11. M. Buncombe (1995). The Substance of Consciousness: An Argument for Interactionism. Avebury.
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  12. Patricia M. Burbank & Diane C. Martins (2010). Symbolic Interactionism and Critical Perspective: Divergent or Synergistic? Nursing Philosophy 11 (1):25-41.
    Throughout their history, symbolic interactionism and critical perspective have been viewed as divergent theoretical perspectives with different philosophical underpinnings. A review of their historical and philosophical origins reveals both points of divergence and areas of convergence. Their underlying philosophies of science and views of human freedom are different as is their level of focus with symbolic interactionism having a micro perspective and critical perspective using a macro perspective. This micro/macro difference is reflected in the divergence of their major concepts, goals (...)
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  13. David J. Chalmers, How Cartesian Dualism Might Have Been True.
    We could have been characters in a huge computer simulation. It is a familiar idea that the whole world might be simulated on a computer, and things would seem exactly the same to us (and indeed, who is to say that we are not).
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  14. John C. Eccles (1980). The Human Psyche. Berlin: Springer.
    The Human Psyche is an in-depth exploration of dualist-interactionism, a concept Sir John Eccles developed with Sir Karl Popper in the context of a wide...
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  15. Avshalom C. Elitzur (2009). Consciousness Makes a Difference: A Reluctant Dualist’s Confession. In A. Batthyany & A. C. Elitzur (eds.), Irreducibly Conscious: Selected Papers on Consciousness.
    This paper’s outline is as follows. In sections 1-3 I give an exposi¬tion of the Mind-Body Problem, with emphasis on what I believe to be the heart of the problem, namely, the Percepts-Qualia Nonidentity and its incompatibility with the Physical Closure Paradigm. In 4 I present the “Qualia Inaction Postulate” underlying all non-interactionist theo¬ries that seek to resolve the above problem. Against this convenient postulate I propose in section 5 the “Bafflement Ar¬gument,” which is this paper's main thesis. Sections 6-11 (...)
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  16. Avshalom C. Elitzur (1995). Consciousness Can No Longer Be Ignored. Journal of Consciousness Studies 2 (4):353-58.
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  17. Avshalom C. Elitzur (1990). Neither Idealism nor Materialism: A Reply to Snyder. Journal of Mind and Behavior 303:303-307.
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  18. Avshalom C. Elitzur (1989). Consciousness and the Incompleteness of the Physical Explanation of Behavior. Journal of Mind and Behavior 10 (1):1-20.
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  19. John A. Foster (1991). The Immaterial Self: A Defense of the Cartesian Dualist Conception of Mind. Routledge.
    The Immaterial Self examines and defends this thesis, and in particular argues for its Cartesian version, which assigns the non-physical ingredients of the ...
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  20. Brian J. Garrett (2000). Defending Non-Epiphenomenal Event Dualism. Southern Journal of Philosophy 38 (3):393-412.
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  21. E. Gaviola (1936). The Impossibility of Interaction Between Mind and Matter. Philosophy of Science 3 (2):133-142.
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  22. I. Hanzel (2011). Beyond Blumer and Symbolic Interactionism: The Qualitative-Quantitative Issue in Social Theory and Methodology. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 41 (3):303-326.
    The article analysis the views approaching quantitative and qualitative methods in social sciences as separable or irreconcilable. First, we characterize these views and show how they deal with this divide and how they view the aspects of the latter. Next, we identify the works of Herbert Blumer as the basis of that divide and subject them to an analysis. Finally, by means of categories like quantity, quality, and measure, we show that the qualitative-quantitative divide is based on a wrong approach (...)
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  23. David Hodgson (1991). The Mind Matters: Consciousness and Choice in a Quantum World. Oxford Unversity Press.
    In this book, Hodgson presents a clear and compelling case against today's orthodox mechanistic view of the brain-mind, and in favor of the view that "the mind matters." In the course of the argument he ranges over such topics as consciousness, informal reasoning, computers, evolution, and quantum indeterminancy and non-locality. Although written from a philosophical viewpoint, the book has important implications for the sciences concerned with the brain-mind problem. At the same time, it is largely non-technical, and thus accessible to (...)
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  24. Daniel Holbrook (1992). Descartes on Mind-Body Interaction. Southwest Philosophical Studies 14:74-83.
    In his "Meditations on First Philosophy", Descartes argues for there being a radical difference between mind and body. Yet, we know that mind and body interest. How is this possible? Descartes's answer tothis question is that human nature is a "substantial union" of mind and body. In this essay, Descartes's solution is explained and critically examined.
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  25. Emmett L. Holman (1984). Continuity and the Metaphysics of Dualism. Philosophical Studies 45 (March):197-204.
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  26. Christopher D. Horvath (2000). Interactionism and Innateness in the Evolutionary Study of Human Nature. Biology and Philosophy 15 (3):321-337.
    While most researchers who use evolutionary theory to investigatehuman nature especially human sexuality describe themselves as ``interactionists'', there is no clear consensus on the meaning of thisterm in this context. By interactionism most people in the fieldmean something like, both nature and nurture ``count'' in thedevelopment of human psychology and behavior. Nevertheless, themultidisciplinary nature of evolutionary psychology results in a widevariety of interpretations of this general claim. Today, mostdebates within evolutionary psychology about the innateness of agiven behavioral characteristic or over (...)
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  27. Frank Jackson (1980). Interactionism Revived? Philosophy of Social Science 10 (September):316-23.
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  28. Ole Koksvik (2007). Conservation of Energy is Relevant to Physicalism. Dialectica 61 (4):573–582.
    I argue against Montero’s claim that Conservation of Energy (CoE) has nothing to do with Physicalism. I reject her reconstruction of the argument from CoE against interactionist dualism, and offer instead an alternative reconstruction that better captures the intuitions of those who believe that there is a conflict between interactionist dualism and CoE.
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  29. Thomas Kroedel (2013). Dualist Mental Causation and the Exclusion Problem. Noûs 47 (3).
    The paper argues that dualism can explain mental causation and solve the exclusion problem. If dualism is combined with the assumption that the psychophysical laws have a special status, it follows that some physical events counterfactually depend on, and are therefore caused by, mental events. Proponents of this account of mental causation can solve the exclusion problem in either of two ways: they can deny that it follows that the physical effect of a mental event is overdetermined by its mental (...)
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  30. Robert A. Larmer (1986). Mind-Body Interactionism and the Conservation of Energy. International Philosophical Quarterly 26 (September):277-85.
    One of the major reasons underlying the widespread rejection of the theory that the mind is an immaterial substance distinct from the body, But which nevertheless acts on the body, Is that it is felt that such a theory commits one to denying the principle of the conservation of energy. My aim in this article is to assess the strength of this objection. My thesis is that the usual replies are inadequate, But--Strong as this objection appears--Some important logical distinctions have (...)
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  31. Eric LaRock (2001). Dualistic Interaction, Neural Dependence, and Aquinas's Composite View. Philosophia Christi 3 (2):459-472.
    I explicate the Churchland's dualistic interaction and neural dependence objections to Cartesian dualism and argue that Aquinas’s conception of Aristotelian hylomorphism provides a way out of those objections. -/- .
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  32. Benjamin W. Libet (1994). A Testable Theory of Mind-Brain Interaction. Journal of Consciousness Studies 1 (1):119-26.
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  33. B. I. B. Lindahl (2001). Consciousness, Behavioural Patterns and the Direction of Biological Evolution: Implications for the Mind-Brain Problem. In Paavo Pylkkanen & Tere Vaden (eds.), Dimensions of Conscious Experience. John Benjamins. 73-99.
  34. B. I. B. Lindahl (1997). Consciousness and Biological Evolution. Journal of Theoretical Biology 187 (4):613-29.
    It has been suggested that if the preservation and development of consciousness in the biological evolution is a result of natural selection, it is plausible that consciousness not only has been influenced by neural processes, but has had a survival value itself; and it could only have had this, if it had also been efficacious. This argument for mind-brain interaction is examined, both as the argument has been developed by William James and Karl Popper and as it has been discussed (...)
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  35. B. I. B. Lindahl & P. Århem (1994). Mind as a Force Field: Comments on a New Interactionistic Hypothesis. Journal of Theoretical Biology 171:111-22.
    The survival and development of consciousness in biological evolution call for an explanation. An interactionistic mind-brain theory seems to have the greatest explanatory value in this context. An interpretation of an interactionistic hypothesis, recently proposed by Karl Popper, is discussed both theoretically and based on recent experimental data. In the interpretation, the distinction between the conscious mind and the brain is seen as a division into what is subjective and what is objective, and not as an ontological distinction between something (...)
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  36. Arthur O. Lovejoy (1920). Pragmatism as Interactionism. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 17 (22):589-596.
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  37. E. J. Lowe (2006). Non-Cartesian Substance Dualism and the Problem of Mental Causation. Erkenntnis 65 (1):5-23.
    Non-Cartesian substance dualism (NCSD) maintains that persons or selves are distinct from their organic physical bodies and any parts of those bodies. It regards persons as ‘substances’ in their own right, but does not maintain that persons are necessarily separable from their bodies, in the sense of being capable of disembodied existence. In this paper, it is urged that NCSD is better equipped than either Cartesian dualism or standard forms of physicalism to explain the possibility of mental causation. (...)
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  38. E. J. Lowe (1993). The Causal Autonomy of the Mental. Mind 102 (408):629-44.
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  39. E. J. Lowe (1992). The Problem of Psychophysical Causation. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 70 (3):263-76.
    Argues that there can be interaction without breaking physical laws: e.g. by basic psychic forces, or by varying physical constants, or especially by arranging fractal trees of physical causation leading to behavior.
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  40. Thomas E. Ludwig (1997). Selves and Brains: Tracing a Path Between Interactionism and Materialism. Philosophical Psychology 10 (4):489-495.
    A dialog between Donald MacKay and Mario Bunge, printed in the journal Neuroscience over the course of two years beginning in 1977, provides a conscise summary of MacKay's views on the mind-body relationship. In this dialog, MacKay contrasts the dualistic interactionism theory of Popper and Eccles with Bunge's emergentist materialism theory, and then builds a case for a third alternative based on the notion of mental events embodied in, but not identical to, brain events. Although neuroscience has made tremendous progress (...)
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  41. E. R. Maccormac (1983). Book Reviews : Essential Interactionism: On the Intelligibility of Prejudice. By Barry Glassner. London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1980. Pp. Xvi + 185. $20.00. [REVIEW] Philosophy of the Social Sciences 13 (3):391-393.
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  42. Joseph Margolis (1966). Objectivism and Interactionism. Philosophy of Science 33 (June):118-123.
    The views of linguistic analysts and objectivists are explored with regard to the question of interactionism. It is argued that the admission of a logical difference between explanation by cause and explanation by motive cannot disqualify causal explanations of human action, cannot be construed as challenging the competence of science, and cannot count against interactionism. It is also argued that objectivist programs for eliminating mentalistic concepts either implicitly admit interactionism or cannot distinguish relevantly between interactionism and parallelism.
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  43. Robert N. McCauley & E. Thomas Lawson, Interactionism and the Non Obviousness of Scientific Theories.
    Levine's discussion of Rethinking Religion (1990) and "Crisis of Conscience, Riddle of Identity" (1993) includes some rash charges, some useful comments, and some profound misunderstandings. The latter, especially, reveal areas where we need to clarify and further defend our claims. In the second section we shall discuss the epistemological and methodological issues that Levine raises. Then we shall turn in the third section to theoretical and substantive matters. In fact, Levine remains almost completely silent on substantive matters (except to say (...)
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  44. Linda Mealey (1998). Testosterone-Aggression Relationship: An Exemplar of Interactionism. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (3):380-381.
    Mazur & Booth provide life scientists with an example of the multilevel biopsychosocial approach. Research paradigms have to become more flexible and multidisciplinary if we are to free ourselves from the nature–nurture dichotomy that we have long agreed was simplistic and shortsighted. I point out a variety of kinds of interactions that may be the next frontier for behavioral scientists.
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  45. Angela Mendelovici & Karen Margrethe Nielsen (2012). Review of Stewart Goetz and Charles Taliaferro's A Brief History of the Soul. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews:0-0.
  46. Eugene O. Mills (1997). Interactionism and Physicality. Ratio 10 (2):169-83.
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  47. Eugene O. Mills (1996). Interactionism and Overdetermination. American Philosophical Quarterly 33 (1):105-115.
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  48. Barbara Montero (2006). What Does the Conservation of Energy Have to Do with Physicalism? Dialectica 60 (4):383-396.
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  49. Thomas Natsoulas (1987). Roger W. Sperry's Monist Interactionism. Journal of Mind and Behavior 8:1-21.
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  50. Jörg Neunhäuserer, Ein modernes Konzept des interaktionistischen Dualismus.
    We develop a modern interactive libertarian dualism of physical and mental events using the concept of probability.
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