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  1. Ernest Albee (1896). The Relation of Shaftesbury and Hutcheson to Utilitarianism. Philosophical Review 5 (1):24-35.
  2. Lydia B. Amir (2014). Shaftesbury—An Important Forgotten Indirect Source of Kierkegaard's Thought. Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook 19 (1).
    Name der Zeitschrift: Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook Jahrgang: 19 Heft: 1 Seiten: 189-216.
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  3. Pall S. Ardal & Stanley Grean (1968). Shaftesbury's Philosophy of Religion and Ethics: A Study in Enthusiasm. Philosophical Quarterly 18 (73):367.
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  4. Jorge V. Arregui & Pablo Arnau (1994). Shaftesbury: Father or Critic of Modern Aesthetics? British Journal of Aesthetics 34 (4):350-362.
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  5. Stefano Bacin (2011). Le "Chartae Socraticae" di Shaftesbury. Giornale Critico Della Filosofia Italiana 3:696-697.
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  6. Françoise Badelon (1999). Entre satire et humour, Shaftesbury et le thé'tre élisabéthain. Revue de Métaphysique et de Morale 2:161-172.
    Shaftesbury développe, au début du XVIII e siècle, une philosophie de « l'humeur » qui s'inscrit dans l'élaboration très britannique de la notion d'humour. Entre satire et humour, il propose une théorie de la « bonne humeur », opposée à l'humeur noire, atrabilaire ou mélancolique, inspirée à la fois du théâtre élisabéthain et de la mise en discussion des origines littéraires et philosophiques de la satire. At the beginning of the XVIIIth Century, Shaftesbury develops a philosophy of « humour » (...)
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  7. Sidney Ball (1898). Book Review:The Seventh Earl of Shaftesbury as Social Reformer. Edwin Hodder. [REVIEW] Ethics 9 (1):133-.
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  8. L. ’abbé Charles Batteux (2009). Sztuka. Dialog dedykowany milordowi Shaftesbury\'emu. Filo-Sofija 9 (1(9)):199-208.
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  9. Marcus Brainard (2001). Minding One's Manners: On the »Moral Architecture« of Shaftesbury's Characteristicks. Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch Fur Antike Und Mittelalter 6 (1):217-238.
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  10. R. L. Brett (1951). The Third Earl of Shaftesbury. New York, Hutchinson's University Library.
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  11. John Brown (1751/1970). Essays on the Characteristics (of the Earl of Shaftesbury). New York,Garland Pub..
    ONTHE CHARACTERISTICS OF THE Earl of Shaftesbury. I. On RIDICULE, considered as a Test of Truth. II. On the Motives to Virtue, and the Necessity of ...
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  12. Fabienne Brugère (1997). Shaftesbury: Esquisse d'un manifeste théiste dans l'enquête. Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 187 (1):9 - 19.
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  13. Fabienne Brugère (1995). Esthétique et ressemblance chez Shaftesbury. Revue de Métaphysique et de Morale 100 (4):517 - 531.
    Shaftesbury publie son oeuvre majeure, Characteristics of men, manners, opinions, times en 1711. Son intérêt pour les questions esthétiques apparaît dans leurs relations avec le concept de ressemblance. Puisque l'art produit sa propre théorie de l'imitation, on ne saurait le réduire aux domaines des philosophies naturelle et morale. Shaftesbury publishes his most important work in 1711: Characteristics of men, manners, opinions, times. His interest in aesthetical matters can be seen in his dealings with the word of likeness. The argument that (...)
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  14. Daniel Carey (2006). Locke, Shaftesbury, and Hutcheson: Contesting Diversity in the Enlightenment and Beyond. Cambridge University Press.
    Are human beings linked by a common nature, one that makes them see the world in the same moral way? Or are they fragmented by different cultural practices and values? These fundamental questions of our existence were debated in the Enlightenment by Locke, Shaftesbury, and Hutcheson. Daniel Carey provides an important new historical perspective on their discussion. At the same time, he explores the relationship between these founding arguments and contemporary disputes over cultural diversity and multiculturalism. Our own conflicting positions (...)
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  15. Daniel Carey (2004). Locke, Shaftesbury, and Innateness. Locke Studies 4:13-45.
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  16. E. F. Carritt (1952). The Third Earl of Shaftesbury. By R. L. Brett, Lecturer in English in the University of Bristol. (Hutchinson's University Library. Pp. 231. 15s. Net.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 27 (103):366-.
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  17. Allan L. Carter (1921). Schiller and Shaftesbury. International Journal of Ethics 31 (2):203-228.
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  18. Chester Chapin (1987). British References to Shaftesbury 1700-1800: Additions, with Commentary, to A.O. Aldridge’s List. Philosophy Research Archives 13:315-329.
    Adding to A.O. Aldridge’s 1951 list, this list of British eighteenth-century references to Shaftesbury provides further evidence that the philosophy of Shaftesbury and Hutcheson is an important rival to Lockean empiricism during the early and middle decades of the century. The peak of Shaftesbury’s influence occurs during the 1740’s and 1750’s when the deist controversy was at its height. A more conservative political and religious climate of opinion after 1759 is one reason for the decline of Shaftesbury’s reputation as a (...)
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  19. Chester Chapin (1987). British References to Shaftesbury 1700-1800. Philosophy Research Archives 13:315-329.
    Adding to A.O. Aldridge’s 1951 list, this list of British eighteenth-century references to Shaftesbury provides further evidence that the philosophy of Shaftesbury and Hutcheson is an important rival to Lockean empiricism during the early and middle decades of the century. The peak of Shaftesbury’s influence occurs during the 1740’s and 1750’s when the deist controversy was at its height. A more conservative political and religious climate of opinion after 1759 is one reason for the decline of Shaftesbury’s reputation as a (...)
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  20. Joseph Chaves (2008). Philosophy and Politeness, Moral Autonomy and Malleability in Shaftesbury's Characteristics. In Alexander John Dick & Christina Lupton (eds.), Theory and Practice in the Eighteenth Century: Writing Between Philosophy and Literature. Pickering & Chatto.
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  21. Anthony Ashley Cooper, Enthusiasm Letter to a Friend.
    Copyright ©2010–2015 all rights reserved. Jonathan Bennett [Brackets] enclose editorial explanations. Small ·dots· enclose material that has been added, but can be read as though it were part of the original text. Occasional •bullets, and also indenting of passages that are not quotations, are meant as aids to grasping the structure of a sentence or a thought. Every four-point ellipsis . . . . indicates the omission of a brief passage that seems to present more difficulty than it is worth. (...)
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  22. Anthony Ashley Cooper & Benjamin Rand (1900). The Life, Unpublished Letters, and Philosophical Regimen of Anthony, Earl of Shaftesbury, Ed. By B. Rand.
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  23. Christopher Cunliffe (1985). The Third Earl of Shaftesbury 1671–1713. Philosophical Books 26 (3):143-145.
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  24. Douglas J. den Uyl (1998). Shaftesbury and the Modern Problem of Virtue. Social Philosophy and Policy 15 (01):275-.
    Anthony Ashley Cooper , the Third Earl of Shaftesbury, was the grandson of the First Earl of Shaftesbury . The First Earl, along with John Locke, was a leader and founder of the Whig movement in Britain. Locke was the First Earl's secretary and also the tutor of the Third Earl. Both the First and Third Earls were members of parliament and supporters of Whig causes. Although both the First and Third Earls were involved in politics, the Third Earl is (...)
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  25. Patrycja Dudzik (2007). Anthony Ashley Cooper Shaftesbury, \"List o entuzjazmie. Moraliści\", przeł. A. Grzeliński, Wydawnictwo Naukowe UMK, Toruń 2007, ss. 189. [REVIEW] Filo-Sofija 7 (1(7)).
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  26. M. Ferrando (1998). Shaftesbury: Il giudizio di ercole E il giudizio estetico. Rivista di Estetica 38 (7):111-120.
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  27. Antony Fredriksson (2011). Environmental Aesthetics Beyond the Dialectics of Interest and Disinterest Deconstructing the Myth of Pristine Nature. Nordic Journal of Aesthetics 22 (40-41).
    In this paper I want to scrutinize one of the key ideas within modern Western aesthetics. Beauty is often considered to derive from a virtuous disinterested attitude towards nature. This kind of view has been advocated by thinkers such as Shaftesbury and Kant in the beginning of the so-called aesthetic turn in philosophy. The problem with this view is that it presupposes that nature exists by itself before human intervention in a kind of ideal pristine state. My hypothesis is that (...)
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  28. A. Gatti (1996). Lord Shaftesbury eil problema morale. Giornale Critico Della Filosofia Italiana 75:96-104.
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  29. A. Gatti (1996). The 3rd Earl of Shaftesbury, Cooper, Anthony, Ashley, and the Problem of Morality. Giornale Critico Della Filosofia Italiana 16 (1):96-104.
  30. A. Gatti (1992). Aesthetics and Cosmology in Shaftesbury+ Cooper, Aa. Giornale Critico Della Filosofia Italiana 12 (1):87-101.
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  31. Michael Gill (2006). The British Moralists on Human Nature and the Birth of Secular Ethics. Cambridge ;Cambridge University Press.
    Uncovering the historical roots of naturalistic, secular contemporary ethics, Michael Gill shows how the British moralists of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries completed a Copernican revolution in moral philosophy. They effected a shift from thinking of morality as independent of human nature to thinking of it as part of human nature itself. He also shows how the British Moralists - sometimes inadvertently, sometimes by design - disengaged ethical thinking, first from distinctly Christian ideas and then from theistic commitments altogether. Examining (...)
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  32. Michael B. Gill, Lord Shaftesbury [Anthony Ashley Cooper, 3rd Earl of Shaftesbury]. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Shaftesbury's philosophy combined a powerfully teleological approach, according to which all things are part of a harmonious cosmic order, with sharp observations of human nature (see section 2 below). Shaftesbury is often credited with originating the moral sense theory, although his own views of virtue are a mixture of rationalism and sentimentalism (section 3). While he argued that virtue leads to happiness (section 4), Shaftesbury was a fierce opponent of psychological and ethical egoism (section 5) and of the egoistic social (...)
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  33. Michael B. Gill (2007). Moral Rationalism Vs. Moral Sentimentalism: Is Morality More Like Math or Beauty? Philosophy Compass 2 (1):16–30.
    One of the most significant disputes in early modern philosophy was between the moral rationalists and the moral sentimentalists. The moral rationalists — such as Ralph Cudworth, Samuel Clarke and John Balguy — held that morality originated in reason alone. The moral sentimentalists — such as Anthony Ashley Cooper, the third Earl of Shaftesbury, Francis Hutcheson and David Hume — held that morality originated at least partly in sentiment. In addition to arguments, the rationalists and sentimentalists developed rich analogies. The (...)
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  34. Michael B. Gill (2000). Shaftesbury's Two Accounts of the Reason to Be Virtuous. Journal of the History of Philosophy 38 (4):529-548.
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  35. Richard Glauser (2002). Aesthetic Experience in Shaftesbury: Richard Glauser. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 76 (1):25–54.
    [Richard Glauser] Shaftesbury's theory of aesthetic experience is based on his conception of a natural disposition to apprehend beauty, a real 'form' of things. I examine the implications of the disposition's naturalness. I argue that the disposition is not an extra faculty or a sixth sense, and attempt to situate Shaftesbury's position on this issue between those of Locke and Hutcheson. I argue that the natural disposition is to be perfected in many different ways in order to be exercised in (...)
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  36. Richard Glauser (2002). Shaftesbury: Enthousiasme et expérience religieuse. Revue de Théologie Et de Philosophie 134 (2-3):217-234.
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  37. Theodore Gracyk (2014). The British Aesthetic Tradition: From Shaftesbury to Wittgenstein by Timothy M. Costelloe. Journal of the History of Philosophy 52 (4):848-849.
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  38. Stanley Grean (1982). Anthony Ashley Cooper, Third Earl of Shaftesbury. Complete Works, Selected Letters, and Posthumous Writings in English with Parallel German Translation (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 20 (4):434-436.
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  39. Stanley Grean (1964). Self-Interest and Public Interest in Shaftesbury's Philosophy. Journal of the History of Philosophy 2 (1):37-45.
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  40. Simon Grote (2006). Hutcheson's Divergence From Shaftesbury. Journal of Scottish Philosophy 4 (2):159-172.
    Contrary to the view that Francis Hutcheson attempted to expound, defend, and further develop the philosophical system described in Shaftesbury's Characteristics, some contemporaries of Hutcheson considered Hutcheson's differences from Shaftesbury to be at least as profound as the similarities. The clearest descriptions of those differences can be found in William Leechman's preface to Hutcheson's 1755 System of Moral Philosophy, and more elaborately in a review of Hutcheson's System, probably by Hugh Blair, published in the 1755 Edinburgh Review. Examining Shaftesbury's and (...)
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  41. Adam Grzeliński (2003). Piękno a inne kategorie estetyczne w teorii Shaftesbury\'ego. Filo-Sofija 3 (1(3)):83-96.
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  42. Adam Grzeliński (2001). Entuzjazm i piękno w estetyce Shaftesbury\'ego. Estetyka I Krytyka 1 (1):149-154.
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  43. Adam Grzeliński (1999). Idealny charakter piękna w teorii Shaftesbury'ego. Sztuka I Filozofia 16:254.
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  44. Edmund G. Howells (1977). Hume, Shaftesbury, and the Peirce-James Controversy. Journal of the History of Philosophy 15 (4):449.
  45. Ramón Imaz Franco (2011). Shaftesbury ," Cartas a un estudiante universitario". Endoxa 27:337-376.
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  46. T. H. Irwin (2015). Shaftesbury’s Place in the History of Moral Realism. Philosophical Studies 172 (4):865-882.
    Whewell and ShaftesburyIn contemporary moral philosophy ‘moral realism’ refers to a position in the metaphysics of morality that is analogous to realism about ordinary objects, and to scientific realism about theoretical entities. It is a realist doctrine in contrast to non-cognitivism, constructivism, fictionalism, and nihilism about moral judgments and moral properties. But while these particular contrasts are characteristic of contemporary philosophy, realism itself is much older. Ross, Prichard, and Sidgwick, for instance, hold realist views in the metaphysics of morals, though (...)
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  47. Laurent Jaffro (2008). Shaftesbury on the 'Natural Secretion' and Philosophical Personae. Intellectual History Review 18 (3):349-359.
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  48. M. Jourdain (1927). Book Review:Lord Shaftesbury and Social-Industrial Progress. J. Wesley Bready. [REVIEW] Ethics 37 (3):311-.
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  49. Kinga Kaśkiewicz (2009). Niematerialność sztuki w estetyce XVIII wieku. Rozważania Charlesa Batteux nad myślą lorda Shaftesbury\'ego. Filo-Sofija 9 (1(9)):73-82.
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  50. Lawrence Eliot Klein (1994). Shaftesbury and the Culture of Politeness: Moral Discourse and Cultural Politics in Early Eighteenth-Century England. Cambridge University Press.
    The third Earl of Shaftesbury was a pivotal figure in eighteenth-century thought and culture. Professor Klein's study is the first to examine the extensive Shaftesbury manuscripts and offer an interpretation of his diverse writings as an attempt to comprehend contemporary society and politics and, in particular, to offer a legitimation for the new Whig political order established after 1688. As the focus of Shaftesbury's thinking was the idea of politeness, this study involves the first serious examination of the importance (...)
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