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  1. James H. Austin (1998). Zen and the Brain: Toward an Understanding of Meditation and Consciousness. MIT Press.
    The book uses Zen Buddhism as the opening wedge for an extraordinarily wide-ranging exploration of consciousness.
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  2. Henk Barendregt (forthcoming). The Abidhamma Model of Consciousness and its Consequences. In M.G.T. Kwee, K.J. Gergen & F. Koshikawa (eds.), Buddhist Psychology: Practice, Research & Theory. Taos Institute Publishing, Taos, New Mexico.
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  3. Henk Barendregt, Buddhist Phenomenology.
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  4. Sarasvati Chennakesavan (1954). Mind and Consciousness - a Comparison of Indian and Western Views. Philosophical Quarterly (India) 26 (January):247-252.
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  5. Chi Chienchih (2005). A Cognitive Analysis of Confucian Self-Knowledge: According to Tu Weiming's Explanation. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 4 (2):267-282.
  6. Christian Coseru (2009). Naturalism and Intentionality: A Buddhist Epistemological Approach. Asian Philosophy 19 (3):239-264.
    In this paper I propose a naturalist account of the Buddhist epistemological discussion of _svasa(m)dotvitti_ ('self-awareness', 'self-cognition') following similar attempts in the domains of phenomenology and analytic epistemology. First, I examine the extent to which work in naturalized epistemology and phenomenology, particularly in the areas of perception and intentionality, could be profitably used in unpacking the implications of the Buddhist epistemological project. Second, I argue against a foundationalist reading of the causal account of perception offered by (...)
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  7. Georges Dreyfus & Evan Thompson (2007). Indian Theories of Mind. In P.D. Zelazo, Morris Moscovitch & Evan Thompson (eds.), Cambridge Handbook of Consciousness. Cambridge.
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  8. David Fontana (2007). Mystical Experience. In Max Velmans & Susan Schneider (eds.), The Blackwell Companion to Consciousness. Blackwell. 163--172.
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  9. Jay L. Garfield (2006). The Conventional Status of Reflexive Awareness: What's at Stake in a Tibetan Debate? Philosophy East and West 56 (2):201-228.
    ‘Ju Mipham Rinpoche, (1846-1912) an important figure in the _Ris med_, or non- sectarian movement influential in Tibet in the late 19th and early 20th Centuries, was an unusual scholar in that he was a prominent _Nying ma_ scholar and _rDzog_ _chen_ practitioner with a solid dGe lugs education. He took dGe lugs scholars like Tsong khapa and his followers seriously, appreciated their arguments and positions, but also sometimes took issue with them directly. In his commentary to Candrak¥rti’s _Madhyamakåvatåra, _Mi (...)
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  10. Carl Hooper (2007). Koan Zen and Wittgenstein's Only Correct Method in Philosophy. Asian Philosophy 17 (3):283 – 292.
    Koan Zen is a philosophical practice that bears a strong family resemblance to Wittgenstein's approach to philosophy. In this paper I hope to show that this resemblance is especially evident when we compare the Zen method of koan with Wittgenstein's suggestion, towards the end of his Tractatus, about what would constitute the only correct method in philosophy. Both koan Zen and Wittgenstein's method set limits to the reach of philosophical discourse. Each rules metaphysical speculation out of bounds. Neither, however, represents (...)
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  11. Audrey Joseph (1980). Karman, Self-Knowledge and I-Ching Divination. Philosophy East and West 30 (1):65-75.
  12. A. Krishna Murthy (2010). Silent Thunder: "Self", a Scientific Perspective. Institute of Scientific Research on Vedas.
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  13. Michael Kurak (2001). Buddhism and Brain Science. Journal of Consciousness Studies 8 (11):17-26.
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  14. M. G. T. Kwee, K. J. Gergen & F. Koshikawa (eds.) (forthcoming). Buddhist Psychology: Practice, Research & Theory. Taos Institute Publishing, Taos, New Mexico.
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  15. Jung Young Lee (1974). Death and Beyond in the Eastern Perspective. [New York,Gordon and Breach.
  16. Matthew D. MacKenzie (2007). The Illumination of Consciousness: Approaches to Self-Awareness in the Indian and Western Traditions. Philosophy East and West 57 (1):40-62.
    : Philosophers in the Indian and Western traditions have developed and defended a range of sophisticated accounts of self-awareness. Here, four of these accounts are examined, and the arguments for them are assessed. Theories of self-awareness developed in the two traditions under consideration fall into two broad categories: reflectionist or other-illumination theories and reflexivist or self-illumination theories. Having assessed the main arguments for these theories, it is argued here that while neither reflectionist nor reflexivist theories are adequate as traditionally formulated (...)
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  17. Sangeetha Menon (2001). Towards a Sankarite Approach to Consciousness Studies: A Discussion in the Context of Recent Interdisciplinary Scientific Perspectives. Journal of Indian Council of Philosophical Research 18 (1):95-111.
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  18. Janak Pandey (ed.) (2001). Psychology in India Revisited: Developments in the Discipline, Vol. 2: Personality and Health Psychology. Sage Publications India.
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  19. Ramakrishna Puligandla (1999). The Message of the Mandukya Upanisad: A Phenomenological Analysis of Mind and Consciousness. Indian Philosophical Quarterly 26 (2):221-231.
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  20. C. Ram-Prasad (2001). Saving the Self: Classical Hindu Theories on Consciousness and Contemporary Physicalism. Philosophy East and West 51 (3):378-392.
    Contemporary consciousness studies, where it is not explicitly religious, is mostly physicalist. Theories of self and consciousness in classical Hindu thought can easily be seen to contribute to religious issues in consciousness studies. But it is also the case that there is much in that that can be useful within broadly physicalist parameters of study as well. The Mīmāṃsā and Nyāya schools, while having (nonphysicalist) soteriological goals for the metaphysical self, nonetheless provide theories of its relationship with consciousness that allow (...)
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  21. K. Ramakrishna Rao (2005). Perception, Cognition, and Consciousness in Classical Hindu Psychology. Journal of Consciousness Studies 12 (3):3-30.
    Perception is sensory awareness. Cognition is reflective awareness. Consciousness is awareness-as-such. In Indian psychology, as represented by Samkhya-Yoga and Advaita Vedanta systems, consciousness and mind are fundamentally different. Reality is the composite of being (sat), knowing (cit) and feeling (ananda). Consciousness is the knowledge side of the universe. It is the ground condition of all awareness. Consciousness is not a part or aspect of the mind. Mind is physical and consciousness is not. Consciousness does not interact with the mind, the (...)
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  22. K. Ramakrishna Rao (2002). Bridging Eastern and Western Perspectives on Consciousness: Comment. Journal of Consciousness Studies 9 (11):63-68.
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  23. K. Ramakrishna Rao (2001). Consciousness Studies: A Survey of Perspectives and Research. In Janak Pandey (ed.), Psychology in India Revisited: Developments in the Discipline, Vol. 2: Personality and Health Psychology. Sage Publications India. 19-162.
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  24. K. Ramakrishna Rao (1998). Two Faces of Consciousness: A Look at Eastern and Western Perspectives. Journal of Consciousness Studies 5 (3):309-27.
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  25. Robert Reeves (1989). Abhidhamma as Practical Method. Southwest Philosophical Studies 57:57-64.
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  26. Shri Krishna Saksena (1944/1971). Nature Of Consciousness In Hindu Philosophy. Delhi,: Mitilal Banarsidass.
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  27. Śaṅkarācārya (1996). Upadeśa Sāhasri: Thousand Guidelines to Self-Knowledge. Bharatiya Vidya Bhavan.
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  28. Saṅkarācārya (1964). Self-Knowledge (Ātma-Bodha) of Śrí Śaṅkarācārya. Madras, Akhila Bharata Sankara Seva Samiti.
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  29. Śaṅkarācārya (1962). Ātmabodhaḥ: Self-Knowledge. Madras, Sri Ramakrishna Math.
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  30. Paul Schweizer (1993). Mind/Consciousness Dualism in Sankhya-Yoga Philosophy. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 53 (4):845-859.
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  31. Jonathan Shear (2007). Eastern Methods for Investigating Mind and Consciousness. In Max Velmans & Susan Schneider (eds.), The Blackwell Companion to Consciousness. Blackwell. 697--710.
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  32. Jonathan Shear (1981). Maharshi, Plato and the Tm-Sidhi Program on Innate Structures of Consciousness. Metaphilosophy 12 (January):72-84.
  33. Evan Thompson (2001). Between Ourselves: Second-Person Issues in the Study of Consciousness. Imprint Academic.
    This book puts that right, and goes further by also including decriptions of animal "person-to-person" interactions.
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  34. K. N. Upadhyaya (1991). Śa Dot Ndot Nkara on Reason, Scriptural Authority and Self-Knowledge. Journal of Indian Philosophy 19 (2):121-132.
  35. B. Alan Wallace (2001). Intersubjectivity in Indo-Tibetan Buddhism. In Evan Thompson (ed.), Between Ourselves: Second-Person Issues in the Study of Consciousness. Imprint Academic. 209-230.
  36. Ken Wilber (2000). Waves, Streams, States and Self: Further Considerations for an Integral Theory of Consciousness. Journal of Consciousness Studies 7 (11-12):145-176.
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  37. Mark B. Woodhouse (1978). Consciousness and Brahman-Atman. The Monist 61 (January):109-124.
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