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  1. Carol J. Adams (1994). Neither Man nor Beast: Feminism and the Defense of Animals. Continuum.
    In just a few years, the book became an underground classic. Neither Man Nor Beast takes Adams' thought one step further.
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  2. Carol J. Adams (1991). Ecofeminism and the Eating of Animals. Hypatia 6 (1):125 - 145.
    In this essay, I will argue that contemporary ecofeminist discourse, while potentially adequate to deal with the issue of animals, is now inadequate because it fails to give consistent conceptual place to the domination of animals as a significant aspect of the domination of nature. I will examine six answers ecofeminists could give for not including animals explicitly in ecofeminist analyses and show how a persistent patriarchal ideology regarding animals as instruments has kept the experience of animals from being fully (...)
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  3. Vicky Lynn Adams (2003). The Revolt of Nature: Mary Shelley's "the Last Man" in an Ecofeminist Critical Perspective. Dissertation, The University of Alabama
    The purpose of the dissertation is to revise the general understanding of Mary Shelley's political philosophy in her novel The Last Man, published in 1826. As a second generation Romantic, raised on the precepts of both Godwin's theory of social anarchy and Wollstonecraft's feminism, in addition to the Romantic poets' views of nature, Shelley was influenced by elements of thought that, taken in conjunction, are comparable to contemporary ecofeminism. In the novel, she creates a cultural/social/critical ecofeminist characterization of nature encompassing (...)
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  4. Stacy Alaimo (2000). Undomesticated Ground: Recasting Nature as Feminist Space. Cornell University Press.
    In Undomesticated Ground, Stacy Alaimo issues a bold call to reclaim nature as feminist space.
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  5. John Andrews (1996). Warren, Plumwood, a Rock and a Snake: Some Doubts About Critical Ecological Feminism. Journal of Applied Philosophy 13 (2):141-156.
    In this paper I expound and criticise the arguments of two leading exponents of critical ecological feminism. According to critical ecological feminism responsibility for the oppressions of the natural world and the oppressions of racism and sexism can be traced to a logic of domination that is based on suspect value dualities and presupposes an unacceptable ‘moral extensionism’. I argue firstly that critical ecological feminism's critique of value dualism presupposes the truth of the thesis that humans and non‐humans are morally (...)
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  6. Irina Aristarkhova (2012). Thou Shall Not Harm All Living Beings: Feminism, Jainism, and Animals. Hypatia 27 (3):636-650.
  7. Ingrid Bartsch (2001). Book Review: Chris J. Cuomo. Feminism and Ecological Communities: An Ethic of Flourishing. London and New York: Routledge, 1998. And No�L Sturgeon. Ecofeminist Natures: Race, Gender, Feminist Theory and Political Action. London and New York: Routledge, 1997. [REVIEW] Hypatia 16 (2):109-111.
  8. Whitney A. Bauman (2007). The Eco-Ontology of Social/Ist Ecofeminist Thought. Environmental Ethics 29 (3):279-298.
    The epistemological and ontological claims of social/ist ecofeminist thought (a combination of social and socialist ecofeminism) are moving away from the dichotomy between idealism and materialism (both forms of colonial thinking about humans and the rest of the natural world). The social/ist ecofeminists have constructed a postfoundational “eco-ontology” of nature-cultures (Haraway) in which the ideal and the material are co-agents in the continuing process of creation. Given that contemporary public discourse in the United States on the topic of “environmental issues” (...)
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  9. Gretchen M. Baumgardt (2010). Reframing the Issues : An Ecofeminist Political Theology. In Philip J. Rossi (ed.), God, Grace, and Creation. Orbis Books
  10. How Ecological Should Epistemology Be (2008). Richmond Campbell. Hypatia 23 (1-2):161.
  11. Carol Bigwood (1993). Earth Muse: Feminism, Nature, and Art. Temple University Press.
  12. Lynda I. A. Birke (1994). Feminism, Animals, and Science: The Naming of the Shrew. Open University Press.
  13. Annie L. Booth (2005). Ecofeminism and Globalization. Environmental Ethics 27 (3):317-318.
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  14. Bénédicte Brahic & Susie Jacobs (2013). Empowering Women: A Labor Rights-Based Approach: Case Studies From East African Horticultural Farms. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 26 (3):601-619.
    This article discusses the hitherto little-studied question of women workers’ empowerment through access to labor rights in the east African export horticultural sector. It is based on the work carried out by Women Working Worldwide and its east African partners, drawing on primary research on cut-flower farms in Ethiopia, Tanzania, and Uganda. The focus in discussions of women’s empowerment has tended to be on individual actors rather than collective strategies. We argue that strategies such as action research, education, organization and (...)
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  15. Rachel Brown (2004). Righting Ecofeminist Ethics: The Scope and Use of Moral Entitlement. Environmental Ethics 26 (3):247-265.
    Rights have been criticized as incorporating features that are antithetical to ecofeminism: rights are allegedly inherently adversarial; they are based on a conception of the person that fails to reflect women’s experience, biased in an illegitimate way toward humans rather than nonhumans, overly formal, and incapable of admitting the importance of emotion in ethics. Such criticisms are founded in misunderstandings of the ways in which rights operate and may be met by an adequate theory of rights. The notions of entitlement (...)
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  16. Nadine Brummer (1995). Feminism, Animals and Science: The Naming of the Shrew. Science and Engineering Ethics 1 (3):316-317.
  17. Kelly A. Burns (2008). Warren's Ecofeminist Ethics and Merleau-Ponty's Body-Subject: Intersections. Ethics and the Environment 13 (2):pp. 101-118.
    While Karen Warren offers an ecofeminist ethic that is pluralistic, contextualist, and challenges Cartesian dualism, one area that remains underdeveloped in her theory is embodiment. I will examine Merleau-Ponty’s notion of embodied subjectivity and show that it would fit consistently with her theory. I will also explore some other areas in which the two theories supplement each other.
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  18. E. Carlassare (2000). Socialist and Cultural Ecofeminism Allies in Resistance. Ethics and the Environment 5 (1):89-106.
  19. Christ Carol P. (2008). Ecofeminism: Women, Nature, Dualism and Process-Relational Philosophy. In Michel Weber (ed.), Handbook of Whiteheadian Process Thought. De Gruyter 87-97.
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  20. Jim Cheney (1987). Eco-Feminism and Deep Ecology. Environmental Ethics 9 (2):115-145.
    l examine the degree to which the so-called “deep ecology” movement embodies a feminist sensibility. In part one I take a brief look at the ambivalent attitude of “eco-feminism” toward deep ecology. In part two I show that this ambivalence sterns largely from the fact that deep ecology assimilates feminist insights to a basically masculine ethical orientation. In part three I discuss some of the ways in which deepecology theory might change if it adopted a fundamentally feminist ethical orientation.
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  21. Melissa Clarke (2000). The Good-Natured Feminist: Ecofeminism and the Quest for Democracy. Environmental Ethics 22 (4):439-440.
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  22. Regina Cochrane (2014). Climate Change, Buen Vivir, and the Dialectic of Enlightenment: Toward a Feminist Critical Philosophy of Climate Justice. Hypatia 29 (3):576-598.
    This paper examines the proposal that the indigenous cosmovision of buen vivir (good living)—the “organizing principle” of Ecuador's 2008 and Bolivia's 2009 constitutional reforms—constitutes an appropriate basis for responding to climate change. Advocates of this approach blame climate change on a “civilizational crisis” that is fundamentally a crisis of modern Enlightenment reason. Certain Latin American feminists and indigenous women, however, question the implications, for women, of any proposed “civilizational shift” seeking to reverse the human separation from nonhuman nature wrought via (...)
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  23. Lorraine Code (2008). Thinking About "Ecological Thinking". Hypatia 23 (1):187 - 203.
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  24. Tanya Collings (2011). Frankenstein and Feminism: Contemplating The Memoirs of Elizabeth Frankenstein. Anthropology of Consciousness 22 (1):66-68.
    Theodore Roszak's compelling parable, The Memoirs of Elizabeth Frankenstein, provides an (eco)-feminist view of the “Night of the Living Dead Model” and suggests that only the equal union of “masculine” and “feminine” energies will help us resolve the current eco-crisis. This article further explores the consequences of the highly masculinized post-Enlightenment rationalism as demonstrated in Roszak's novel. Although this article agrees that there is a dangerous imbalance between natural/spiritual and scientific/rational viewpoints, it also stresses that the extreme genderification of these (...)
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  25. Julie Cook (2003). [Book Review] Ecofeminist Philosophy. [REVIEW] Environmental Values 12 (1):131-133.
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  26. Julie Cook (1998). The Philosophical Colonization of Ecofeminism. Environmental Ethics 20 (3):227-246.
    There is general agreement among ecofeminists regarding the desirability of a variety of expressions of ecofeminism, but this pluralism is under threat with the emergence of an approach that emphasizes the primacy of a philosophical ecofeminism which claims the authority to prescribe what ecofeminism should be. The recent anthology Ecological Feminism is symptomatic of this trend, with contributors who affirm the philosophical significance of ecological feminism by privileging philosophers’ voices over those of other ecofeminists, rather than by engaging in critical (...)
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  27. Carol P. Crist & Kathryn Roundtree (2006). Humanity in the Web of Life. Environmental Ethics 28 (2):185-200.
    The humanity-nature divide is a modern Western construction based on the notion that matter (nature) is dead, while consciousness (humanity) is alive, rational, and positioned to use matter (nature) to achieve its ends. In contrast, in the world views of the indigenous Maμori of New Zealand and Aborigines of Australia, nature is not separate from humanity and all is infused with consciousness. The ecofeminist and Goddess movements which emerged in the last decades of the twentieth-century, share with many indigenous religions (...)
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  28. Chris Crittenden (2000). Ecofeminism Meets Business: A Comparison of Ecofeminist, Corporate, and Free Market Ideologies. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 24 (1):51 - 63.
    This paper develops a psychological and ethical ecofeminist position and then compares ecofeminism to corporate and free market capitalism in terms of effects along four scales of well-being: democracy/human rights, environmental health, psychological health, and cruelty toward animals. Using aspects of symbolic interactionism and Antony Weston's self-validating reduction model, it is demonstrated that an ecofeminist belief system tends to promote moral and psychological health whereas the discussed forms of capitalistic thinking militate in the other direction. Ecofeminism is not, however, incompatible (...)
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  29. Chris J. Cuomo (2011). Climate Change, Vulnerability, and Responsibility. Hypatia 26 (4):690-714.
    In this essay I present an overview of the problem of climate change, with attention to issues of interest to feminists, such as the differential responsibilities of nations and the disproportionate “vulnerabilities” of females, people of color, and the economically disadvantaged in relation to climate change. I agree with others that justice requires governments, corporations, and individuals to take full responsibility for histories of pollution, and for present and future greenhouse gas emissions. Nonetheless I worry that an overemphasis on household (...)
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  30. Chris J. Cuomo (2002). On Ecofeminist Philosophy. Ethics and the Environment 7 (2):1-11.
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  31. Chris J. Cuomo (2001). Still Fooling with Mother Nature. [REVIEW] Hypatia 16 (3):149 - 156.
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  32. Chris J. Cuomo (2001). Review: Still Fooling with Mother Nature. [REVIEW] Hypatia 16 (3):149 - 156.
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  33. Chris J. Cuomo (1999). Ecofeminist Natures: Race, Gender, Feminist Theory and Political Action. Environmental Ethics 21 (4):429-432.
  34. Christine J. Cuomo (1992). Unravelling the Problems in Ecofeminism. Environmental Ethics 14 (4):351-363.
    Karen Warren has argued that environmental ethics must be feminist and that feminist ethics must be ecological. Hence, she endorses ecofeminism as an environmental ethic with power and promise. Recent ecofeminist theory, however, is not as powerful as one might hope. In fact, I argue, much of this theory is based on values that are potentially damaging to moral agents, and that are not in accord withfeminist goals. My intent is not to dismantle ecofeminism, but to analyze and clarify some (...)
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  35. Christine June Cuomo (1992). Ecological Feminism as Environmental Ethics. Dissertation, The University of Wisconsin - Madison
    Karen Warren has argued that environmental ethics must be feminist and that feminist ethics must be ecological. She endorses ecological feminism, or ecofeminism, as an environmental ethic with power and promise. Warren's assertions are worth investigating, for if vindicated they call for radical revision of much contemporary political and ethical thought. But recent ecofeminism theory is not as powerful as one might hope. I argue that much of this theory is based on values which are potentially damaging to moral agents, (...)
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  36. Deane Curtin (1994). Dōgen, Deep Ecology, and the Ecological Self. Environmental Ethics 16 (2):195-213.
    A core project for deep ecologists is the reformulation of the concept of self. In searching for a more inclusive understanding of self, deep ecologists often look to Buddhist philosophy, and to the Japanese Buddhist philosopher Dōgen in particular, for inspiration. I argue that, while Dōgen does share a nondualist, nonanthropocentric framework with deep ecology, his phenomenology of the self is fundamentally at odds with the expanded Self found in the deep ecology literature. I suggest, though I do not fully (...)
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  37. Deane Curtin (1991). Toward an Ecological Ethic of Care. Hypatia 6 (1):60 - 74.
    This paper argues that the language of rights cannot express distinctively ecofeminist insights into the treatment of nonhuman animals and the environment. An alternative is proposed in the form of a politicized ecological ethic of care which can express ecofeminist insights. The paper concludes with consideration of an ecofeminist moral issue: how we choose to understand ourselves morally in relation to what we are willing to count as food. "Contextual moral vegetarianism" represents a response to a politicized ecological ethic of (...)
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  38. F. D'Eaubonne (1999). Feminism—Ecology: Revolution or Mutation? Ethics and the Environment 4 (2):175-177.
  39. Vrinda Dalmiya (2002). Cows and Others: Toward Constructing Ecofeminist Selves. Environmental Ethics 24 (2):149-168.
    I examine the kind of alliances and ironic crossing of borders that constitute an ecofeminist subjectivity by appeal to a postcolonial literary imagination and ahistorical philosophical argumentation. I link the theoretical insights of a modern short story “Bestiality” with a concept of “congenital debt” found in the ancient Vedic corpus to suggest a notion of ecological selfhood that transforms into the idea of a “gift community” to encompass nonhumans as well as people on the fringes of society, but without the (...)
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  40. Arpana Dhar Das (2005). Ecofeminism. Indian Philosophical Quarterly 32 (1/2).
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  41. Victoria Davion (2014). Climate Change, Ethics, and Human Security. Edited by Karen O'Brien, Asunción Lera ST. Clair and Berit Kristoffersen. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 2010. [REVIEW] Hypatia 29 (3):707-712.
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  42. Victoria Davion (2009). Feminist Perspectives on Global Warming, Genocide, and Card's Theory of Evil. Hypatia 24 (1):160 - 177.
    This essay explores several moral issues raised by global warming through the lens of Claudia Card's theory of evil. I focus on Alaskan villages in the sub-Arctic whose residents must relocate owing to extreme erosion, melting sea ice, and rising water levels. I use Card's discussion of genocide as social death to argue that failure to help these groups maintain their unique cultural identities can be thought of as genocidal.
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  43. Isabel Davis (2012). Ecofeminist Subjectivities: Chaucer's Talking Birds. [REVIEW] The Medieval Review 4.
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  44. Mary Jo Deegan & Christopher W. Podeschi (2001). The Ecofeminist Pragmatism of Charlotte Perkins Gilman. Environmental Ethics 23 (1):19-36.
    We read the roots of contemporary ecofeminism through the lens of feminist pragmatism. After indicating the general relation between ecofeminism and feminist pragmatism, we provide a detailed analysis of Charlotte Perkins Gilman’s saga Herland and With Her in Ourland to document the strong connection between these two traditions. Gilman’s congruencies with ecofeminism make clear that she was a forerunner and perhaps a foundation for contemporary ecofeminism. However, further analyses are needed to reveal the full import of this link between ecofeminism (...)
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  45. Christian Diehm (2002). Arne Naess, Val Plumwood, and Deep Ecological Subjectivity: A Contribution to the "Deep Ecology-Ecofeminism Debate". Ethics and the Environment 7 (1):24-38.
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  46. Josephine Donovan (2008). Feminism and the Treatment of Animals : From Care to Dialogue. In Susan J. Armstrong & Richard George Botzler (eds.), The Animal Ethics Reader. Routledge
  47. Josephine Donovan (1996). Ecofeminist Literary Criticism: Reading The Orange. Hypatia 11 (2):161 - 184.
    Ecofeminism, a new vein in feminist theory, critiques the ontology of domination, whereby living beings are reduced to the status of objects, which diminishes their moral significance, enabling their exploitation, abuse, and destruction. This article explores the possibility of an ecofeminist literary and cultural practice, whereby the text is not reduced to an "it" but rather recognized as a "thou," and where new modes of relationship-dialogue, conversation, and meditative attentiveness-are developed.
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  48. Jane Duran (1990). Ecofeminism and Androcentric Epistemology. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 5 (2):9-14.
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  49. Sara Ebenreck (1999). Ecofeminism as Politics: Nature, Marx and the Postmodern. Environmental Ethics 21 (4):437-440.
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  50. Norbert Elliot (1999). Literature, Nature, and Other: Ecofeminist Critiques. Environmental Ethics 21 (2):217-219.
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