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  1. Fernando Aguiar, Pablo Brañas-Garza, Maria Paz Espinosa & Luis M. Miller (2010). Personal Identity: A Theoretical and Experimental Analysis. Journal of Economic Methodology 17 (3):261-275.
    This paper aims to analyze the role of personal identity in altruism. To this end, it starts by reviewing critically the growing literature on economics and identity. Considering the ambiguities that the concept of social identity poses, our proposal focuses on the concept of personal identity. A formal model to study how personal identity enters in individuals' utility function when facing a dictator game decision is then presented. Finally, this ?identity-based? utility function is studied experimentally. The experiment allows us to (...)
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  2. S. M. Amadae (2004). Rationality and Freedom, by Amartya Sen. Harvard University Press 2003. Economics and Philosophy 20 (2):381-389.
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  3. Paul Anand (2011). Capabilities and Happiness, Edited by Luigino Bruni, Flavio Comim and Maurizio Pugno. Oxford University Press, 2008. Vii + 352 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 27 (2):175-179.
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  4. Paul Anand & Jochen Runde (1997). Rationality and Methodology: Symposium. Journal of Economic Methodology 4 (1).
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  5. Judy Attfield (ed.) (1999). Utility Reassessed: The Role of Ethics in the Practice of Design. Distributed Exclusively in the Usa by St. Martin's Press.
    This sparkling collection of essays both defines and reassesses the concept of Utility. Using it as a touchstone for the consideration of the place of ethics in the recent history of design, the collection offers a way into the issues which concern design decision-makers today. It offers previously unpublished research into diverse topics such as the investigation into the hitherto undiscovered designs for a utility vehicle, and it reveals a fresh perspective on the philosophy behind the concept of Utility as (...)
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  6. Drucilla K. Barker & Edith Kuiper (eds.) (2003). Toward a Feminist Philosophy of Economics. Routledge.
    Feminist economists have demonstrated that interrogating hierarchies based on gender, ethnicity, class and nation results in an economics that is biased and more faithful to empirical evidence than are mainstream accounts. This rigorous and comprehensive book examines many of the central philosophical questions and themes in feminist economics including: · History of economics · Feminist science studies · Identity and agency · Caring labor · Postcolonialism and postmodernism With contributions from such leading figures as Nancy Folbre, Julie Nelson and Sandra (...)
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  7. Frederic Bastiat, Government.
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  8. Kenneth G. Binmore (2001). John Broome, Ethics Out of Economics, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 1999, Pp. 267. Utilitas 13 (01):127-.
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  9. Luigino Bruni (2012). The Genesis and Nature of the Ethos of the Market. Palgrave Macmillan.
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  10. Luigino Bruni (2012). The Genesis and Ethos of the Market. Palgrave Macmillan.
    In this book Luigino Bruni analyses the market and its ethos, illuminating the history of capitalism and highlighting the need for a new ethical direction.
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  11. Luigino Bruni (2011). The Idea of Justice, Amartya Sen, The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2009, 467 Pp. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 27 (03):324-331.
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  12. Tom Bunyard (2011). Libertarian Communism: Marx, Engels and the Political Economy of Freedom. Historical Materialism 19 (3):205-212.
  13. Betsy Jane Clary, Wilfred Dolfsma & Deborah M. Figart (eds.) (2006). Ethics and the Market: Insights From Social Economics. Routledge.
    Much existing economic theory overlooks ethics. Rather than situating the market and values at separate extremes of a continuum, Ethics and the Market contends that the two are necessarily and intimately related. This volume brings together some of the best work in the social economics tradition, with contributions on the social economy, social capital, identity, ethnicity and development, the household, externalities, international finance, capability, and pedagogy. Proceeding from an examination of the moral implications of markets, the book goes on to (...)
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  14. Colin Danby (2004). Lupita's Dress: Care in Time. Hypatia 19 (4):23-48.
    : Carol Gilligan's temporally embedded caring subjects reason in terms of relationships with and forward-looking responsibilities to others, and consider how their decisions will shape future ties. Subsequent work in philosophy and economics has had difficulty developing these aspects because of an underlying social ontology that excludes them. This paper draws on a heterodox tradition, post-Keynesianism, to develop an alternative social ontology and an analysis of material life that takes time fully into account.
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  15. John B. Davis (2012). The Idea of Public Reasoning. Journal of Economic Methodology 19 (2):169 - 172.
    Journal of Economic Methodology, Volume 19, Issue 2, Page 169-172, June 2012.
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  16. Jelle de Boer (2014). Preference, Value, Choice, and Welfare. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 30:99-103.
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  17. C. W. DeMarco (2001). Knee Deep in Technique: The Ethics of Monopoly Capital. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 31 (2):151 - 164.
    The moral intuitions and arguments of some prominent business ethics authors regarding the ethics of monopoly are drenched with contestable economic theory. Discussions too typically ignore theoretical alternatives and debates about the nature of monopolies, their assets and liabilities. I review the theoretical debates and show why they matter to business ethics. That there may be genuine cases of rivalrous monopoly, that monopolies might in the odd circumstance prove more efficient or become advantageous in contests with labor or useful in (...)
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  18. Ned Dobos (2012). The Democratization of Credit. Journal of Social Philosophy 43 (1):50-63.
  19. Keith Dowding & Martin van Hees (2007). Counterfactual Success and Negative Freedom. Economics and Philosophy 23 (2):141-162.
    Recent theories of negative freedom see it as a value-neutral concept; the definition of freedom should not be in terms of specific moral values. Specifically, preferences or desires do not enter into the definition of freedom. If preferences should so enter then Berlin's problem that a person may enhance their freedom by changing their preferences emerges. This paper demonstrates that such a preference-free conception brings its own counter-intuitive problems. It concludes that these problems might be avoided if the description of (...)
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  20. Amitava Krishna Dutt (2010). Economics and Ethics: An Introduction. Palgrave Macmillan.
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  21. Ragip Ege & Herrade Igersheim (eds.) (2011). Freedom and Happiness in Economic Thought and Philosophy: From Clash to Reconciliation. Routledge.
    Starting from a distinction made by the American philosopher, John Rawls, in 2000 between two kinds of liberalism, "liberalism of freedom" and "liberalism of happiness," this book presents a range of articles by economists and philosophers ...
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  22. Jean-Joseph Goux (1990). Symbolic Economies: After Marx and Freud. Cornell University Press.
    Looking closely at the work of such major figures as Lacan, Derrida, and Nietzsche, Goux extends the implications of Marxism and Freudianism to an interdisciplinary semiotics of value and proposes a radical concept of exchange.
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  23. Nataraja Guru (1980). Towards a One World Economics. Narayana Gurukula.
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  24. James Halteman & Edd S. Noell (2012). Reckoning With Markets: The Role of Moral Reflection in Economics. OUP USA.
    Undergraduate economics students begin and end their study of economics with the simple claim that economics is value free. Only in a policy role will values and beliefs enter into economic work; there can be little meaningful dialogue by economists about such personal views and opinions. This view, now well over 200 years old, has been challenged by heterodox thinkers in economics, and philosophers and social scientists outside the discipline all along the way. However, much of the debate in modern (...)
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  25. Alan P. Hamlin (1989). Rights, Indirect Utilitarianism, and Contractarianism. Economics and Philosophy 5 (02):167-.
  26. Peter J. Hammond (1991). Morality Within the Limits of Reason, Russell Hardin. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1988, Xx + 234 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 7 (02):300-.
  27. R. Hamowy (1996). Book Reviews : F. A. Hayek, Hayek on Hayek: An Autobiographical Dialogue. Edited by Stephen Kresge and Leif Wenar. University of Chicago Press, Chicago, 1994. Pp. Xi + 170. $27.50. [REVIEW] Philosophy of the Social Sciences 26 (3):417-421.
  28. Jean Hampton (1996). The Limits of Hobbesian Contractarianism, Jody Krauss, Cambridge University Press, 1993, 334 + Ix Pages. Economics and Philosophy 12 (01):125-.
  29. Jean Hampton (1987). Free-Rider Problems in the Production of Collective Goods. Economics and Philosophy 3 (02):245-.
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  30. D. W. Hands (2004). Book Reviews: Selected Essays by Frank H. Knight. Volume 1: What Is Truth in Economics?, Selected Essays by Frank H. Knight. Volume 2: Laissez-Faire: Pro and Con. [REVIEW] Philosophy of the Social Sciences 34 (4):590-593.
  31. D. Wade Hands (1987). Human Agency and Language: Philosophical Papers I, Charles Taylor, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1985, 294 Pages.Philosophy and the Human Sciences: Philosophical Papers II, Charles Taylor, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1985, 337 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 3 (01):172-.
  32. Sven Ove Hansson (2007). Philosophical Problems in Cost–Benefit Analysis. Economics and Philosophy 23 (2):163-183.
    Cost–benefit analysis (CBA) is much more philosophically interesting than has in general been recognized. Since it is the only well-developed form of applied consequentialism, it is a testing-ground for consequentialism and for the counterfactual analysis that it requires. Ten classes of philosophical problems that affect the practical performance of cost–benefit analysis are investigated: topic selection, dependence on the decision perspective, dangers of super synopticism and undue centralization, prediction problems, the indeterminateness of our control over future decisions, the need to exclude (...)
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  33. D. M. Hausman (2011). Mistakes About Preferences in the Social Sciences. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 41 (1):3-25.
    Preferences are the central notion in mainstream economic theory, yet economists say little about what preferences are. This article argues that preferences in mainstream positive economics are comparative evaluations with respect to everything relevant to value or choice, and it argues against three mistaken views of preferences: (1) that they are matters of taste, concerning which rational assessment is inappropriate, (2) that preferences coincide with judgments of expected self-interested benefit, and (3) that preferences can be defined in terms of choices.
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  34. Daniel M. Hausman (2010). Hedonism and Welfare Economics. Economics and Philosophy 26 (03):321-344.
    This essay criticizes the proposal recently defended by a number of prominent economists that welfare economics be redirected away from the satisfaction of people's preferences and toward making people happy instead. Although information about happiness may sometimes be of use, the notion of happiness is sufficiently ambiguous and the objections to identifying welfare with happiness are sufficiently serious that welfare economists are better off using preference satisfaction as a measure of welfare. The essay also examines and criticizes the position associated (...)
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  35. Daniel M. Hausman, Philosophy of Economics. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    This is a comprehensive anthology of works concerning the nature of economics as a science, including classic texts and essays exploring specific branches and schools of economics. Apart from the classics, most of the selections in the third edition are new, as are the introduction and bibliography. No other anthology spans the whole field and offers a comprehensive introduction to questions about economic methodology.
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  36. Daniel M. Hausman (2006). Economic Analysis, Moral Philosophy, and Public Policy. Cambridge University Press.
    This book shows through accessible argument and numerous examples how understanding moral philosophy can improve economic analysis, how moral philosophy can benefit from economists' analytical tools, and how economic analysis and moral philosophy together can inform public policy. Part I explores rationality and its connections to morality. It argues that in defending their model of rationality, mainstream economists implicitly espouse contestable moral principles. Part II concerns welfare, utilitarianism and standard welfare economics, while Part III considers important moral notions that are (...)
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  37. Daniel M. Hausman & Michael S. McPherson (2009). Preference Satisfaction and Welfare Economics. Economics and Philosophy 25 (1):1-25.
    The tenuous claims of cost-benefit analysis to guide policy so as to promote welfare turn on measuring welfare by preference satisfaction and taking willingness-to-pay to indicate preferences. Yet it is obvious that people's preferences are not always self-interested and that false beliefs may lead people to prefer what is worse for them even when people are self-interested. So welfare is not preference satisfaction, and hence it appears that cost-benefit analysis and welfare economics in general rely on a mistaken theory of (...)
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  38. Daniel M. Hausman & Michael S. McPherson (1988). Standards. Economics and Philosophy 4 (01):1-.
  39. Olof Johansson-Stenman (1998). On the Problematic Link Between Fundamental Ethics and Economic Policy Recommendations. Journal of Economic Methodology 5 (2):263-297.
    This paper provides a systematic survey of major simplifying assumptions that economists make, and often have to make, in order to obtain a useful theory for policy recommendations in practice. The aim is to consider the whole chain of assumptions with an emphasis on such simplifications that economists sometimes tend to ignore (at worst), or at best often tend not to take very seriously. The paper concludes that the link from fundamental ethics to economic policy recommendations is often very fragile, (...)
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  40. Stephen John (forthcoming). Efficiency, Responsibility and Disability: Philosophical Lessons From the Savings Argument for Pre-Natal Diagnosis. Politics, Philosophy and Economics:1470594-13505412.
    Pre-natal-diagnosis technologies allow parents to discover whether their child is likely to suffer from serious disability. One argument for state funding of access to such technologies is that doing so would be “cost-effective”, in the sense that the expected financial costs of such a programme would be outweighed by expected “benefits”, stemming from the births of fewer children with serious disabilities. This argument is extremely controversial. This paper argues that the argument may not be as unacceptable as is often assumed. (...)
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  41. Philippe Mongin (2001). The Impartial Observer Theorem of Social Ethics. Economics and Philosophy 17 (2):147-179.
    Following a long-standing philosophical tradition, impartiality is a distinctive and determining feature of moral judgments, especially in matters of distributive justice. This broad ethical tradition was revived in welfare economics by Vickrey, and above all, Harsanyi, under the form of the so-called Impartial Observer Theorem. The paper offers an analytical reconstruction of this argument and a step-wise philosophical critique of its premisses. It eventually provides a new formal version of the theorem based on subjective probability.
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  42. Leonidas Montes & Eric Schliesser (eds.) (2006). New Voices on Adam Smith. Routledge.
    n recent years, there has been a resurgence of academic interest in Adam Smith. As a consequence, a large number of PhD dissertations on Smith have been written by international scholars - in different languages, and in many diverse disciplines, including economics, women’s studies, philosophy, science studies, political theory and english literature: diversity which has enriched the area of study. In response to this activity, and in order to making these contributions more easily accessible to other Smith scholars, Leonidas Montes (...)
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  43. Martin O'Neill (2013). Economics After the Crisis, and the Crisis in Economics. Renewal 21 (2-3):132-43.
  44. Amartya Sen (1996). Rationality, Joy and Freedom. Critical Review 10 (4):481-494.
    Abstract In The Joyless Economy, Tibor Scitovsky proposes a model of human behavior that differs substantially from that of standard economic theory. Scitovsky begins with a basic distinction between ?comfort? and ?stimulation.? While stimulation is ultimately more satisfying and creative, we frequently fall for the bewitching attractions of comfort, which leads to impoverished lives. Scitovsky's analysis has far?reaching implications not only for the idea of rationality, but for the concept of utility (by making it plural in nature) and, perhaps most (...)
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Economics and Justice
  1. Paul Anand, Prastanta Pattanaik & Clemens Puppe (eds.) (2009). The Handbook of Rational and Social Choice. Oxford University Press, USA.
    The Handbook of Rational and Social Choice provides an overview of issues arising in work on the foundations of decision theory and social choice over the past ...
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  2. Elizabeth Anderson (2001). Symposium on Amartya Sen's Philosophy: 2 Unstrapping the Straitjacket of ‘Preference’: A Comment on Amartya Sen's Contributions to Philosophy and Economics. Economics and Philosophy 17 (1):21-38.
    The concept of preference dominates economic theory today. It performs a triple duty for economists, grounding their theories of individual behavior, welfare, and rationality. Microeconomic theory assumes that individuals act so as to maximize their utility – that is, to maximize the degree to which their preferences are satisfied. Welfare economics defines individual welfare in terms of preference satisfaction or utility, and social welfare as a function of individual preferences. Finally, economists assume that the rational act is the act that (...)
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  3. Elizabeth Anderson (1995). Inequality Reexamined, Sen Amartya. Harvard University Press, 1992, 207 + Xiv Pages. Economics and Philosophy 11 (01):182-.
  4. N. Scott Arnold (2000). Free Markets and Social Justice, Cass Sunstein. Oxford University Press, 1997, VI + 405 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 16 (2):333-378.
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  5. Jeremy Bentham & Dan Usher (1999). Why'law and Economics'is Not the Frankenstein Monster. Economics and Philosophy 15:249-267.
  6. Geoffrey Brennan (2007). Discounting the Future, yet Again. Politics, Philosophy and Economics 6 (3):259-284.
    discounting the future' is one on which philosophers and economists have divergent professional views. There is a lot of talking at cross-purposes across the disciplinary divide here; but there is a fair bit of confusion (I think) within disciplines as well. My aim here is essentially clarificatory. I draw several distinctions that I see as significant: • between inter-temporal and intergenerational questions • between price (discount rate) and quantity (inter-temporal and intergenerational allocations) as the ethically relevant magnitude, and • between (...)
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