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  1. H. B. Acton (1972). The Ethics of Capitalism. London,Foundation for Business Responsibilities.
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  2. Joseph Agassi (1999). The Notion of the Modern Nation-State: Popper and Nationalism. In I. C. Jarvie & Sandra Pralong (eds.), Popper's Open Society After Fifty Years: The Continuing Relevance of Karl Popper. Routledge.
  3. Jonathan Aldred (2009). The Skeptical Economist: Revealing the Ethics Inside Economics. Earthscan.
    Introduction : ethical economics? -- The sovereign consumer -- Two myths about economic growth -- The politics of pay -- Happiness -- Pricing life and nature -- New worlds of money : public services and beyond -- Conclusion.
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  4. Sabina Alkire (2009). Development : A Misconceived Theory Can Kill. In Christopher W. Morris (ed.), Amartya Sen. Cambridge University Press.
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  5. Elizabeth Anderson (1990). The Ethical Limitations of the Market. Economics and Philosophy 6 (02):179-.
  6. Joel Anderson (2010). Nudge: Improving Decisions About Health, Wealth, and Happiness, Richard H. Thaler and Cass R. Sunstein. Yale University Press, 2008. X + 293 Pages. [Paperback Edition, Penguin, 2009, 320 Pages.]. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 26 (03):369-376.
  7. David Archard (1998). Contested Commodities: The Trouble with Trade in Sex, Children, Body Parts, and Other Things, Margaret Jane Radin. Harvard University Press, 1996, Xiv + 279 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 14 (02):362-.
  8. Richard J. Arneson (1996). Value in Ethics and Economics, Elizabeth Anderson. Harvard University Press, 1993. 246 + Xvi Pages. Economics and Philosophy 12 (01):89-.
  9. N. Scott Arnold (1987). Marx And Disequilibrium in Market Socialist Relations of Production. Economics and Philosophy 3 (01):23-.
  10. Andy Bahn & John Gowdy (2003). Economics Weak and Strong: Ecological Economics and Human Survival. World Futures 59 (3 & 4):253 – 262.
    Mounting evidence suggests that the human impact on the planet is reaching the point where the Earth's ecosystems will not be able to support the level of human occupation. The global economy also seems to be generating income disparities that threaten the social stability of even the most developed economies. Although both these trends are rooted in the operation of the global market economy, standard economics has surprisingly little to offer in the way of policies that might allow us to (...)
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  11. Benjamin Balak (2006). Mccloskey's Rhetoric: Discourse Ethics in Economics. Routledge.
    Deirdre McCloskey is rightly one of the most recognizable names in economics. She views economics as a language that uses all the rhetorical devices of everyday conversation and therefore it should be judged by aesthetic and literary standards and not the criteria of mathematical rigor that is espoused by the mainstream. This controversial standpoint has been hugely influential and this examination of the methodological and philosophical consequences of her work is overdue, and very welcome.
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  12. Jordan J. Ballor (2010). Ecumenical Babel: Confusing Economic Ideology and the Church's Social Witness. Christian's Library Press.
    Critical engagement -- Lutheran World Federation (LWF) -- World Communion of Reformed Churches (WCRC) -- World Council of Churches (WCC) -- Conclusion, avenues for reform.
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  13. Peter J. Boettke (2004). Obituary. Don Lavoie (1950–2001). Journal of Economic Methodology 11 (3):377-379.
  14. Geoffrey Brennan (1998). Economic Analysis and Moral Philosophy, David M. Hausman and Michael S. McPherson. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1996, Xii + 249 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 14 (02):339-.
  15. Geoffrey Brennan & Alan Hamlin (1995). Constitutional Political Economy: The Political Philosophy of Homo Economicus? Journal of Political Philosophy 3 (3):280–303.
  16. Geoffrey Brennan & Daniel Moseley (forthcoming). Economics and Ethics. In Hugh LaFollette (ed.), International Encyclopedia of Ethics. Wiley-Blackwell.
    We identify three points of intersection between economics and ethics: the ethics of economics, ethics in economics and ethics out of economics. These points of intersection reveal three types of conversation between economists and moral philosophers that have produced, and may continue to produce, fruitful exchange between the disciplines.
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  17. Harry Brighouse (1994). Choosing Justice: An Experimental Approach to Ethical Theory, Frohlich Norman and Joe A. Oppenheimer. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1992, Xiv + 258 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 10 (01):127-.
  18. Ulrich Bröckling, Susanne Krasmann & Thomas Lemke (eds.) (2010). Governmentality: Current Issues and Future Challenges. Routledge.
    By assembling authors with a wide range of different disciplinary backgrounds, from philosophy, literature, political science, sociology to medical anthropology ...
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  19. John Broome (2007). Replies. Economics and Philosophy 23 (1):115-124.
  20. John Broome (2007). Reply to Jones-Lee. Economics and Philosophy 23 (3):385-387.
  21. John Broome (1992). Deontology and Economics. Economics and Philosophy 8 (02):269-282.
  22. John Broome (1991). A Reply to Sen. Economics and Philosophy 7 (02):285-.
  23. Campbell Brown (2003). Giving Up Levelling Down. Economics and Philosophy 19 (1):111-134.
  24. Vivienne Brown (1995). Reading Adam Smith's Texts on Morals and Wealth. Economics and Philosophy 11 (02):344-.
    In his Comment , Richard Arlen Kleer accepts much of the argument in my article (Brown, 1991) but insists that I have (Kleer, 1993). Kleer agrees that there is a moral hierarchy in Adam Smith's Theory of Moral Sentiments (TMS) where benevolence and self-command are ranked higher than justice and prudence, but he is uneasy with the conclusion that economic activity and the pursuit of gain are activities and insists that they do have a significant moral standing. In addition, although (...)
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  25. Vivienne Brown (1991). Signifying Voices: Reading the “Adam Smith Problem”. Economics and Philosophy 7 (02):187-.
  26. Luigino Bruni (2010). Reciprocity: An Economics of Social Relations , Serge C. Kolm. Cambridge University Press, 2008. XI + 390 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 26 (2):241-247.
  27. Allen E. Buchanan (1985). Ethics, Efficiency, and the Market. Rowman & Allanheld.
    This is a systematic evaluation of the main arguments for and against the market as an instrument of social organization, balancing efficiency and justice .
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  28. James M. Buchanan (1988). The Economics of Rights, Co-Operation, and Welfare, Robert Sugden. Oxford: Basil Blackwell, 1986, Vii + 191 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 4 (02):341-.
  29. Krister Bykvist (2010). Can Unstable Preferences Provide a Stable Standard of Well-Being? Economics and Philosophy 26 (1):1-26.
    How do we determine the well-being of a person when her preferences are not stable across worlds? Suppose, for instance, that you are considering getting married, and that you know that if you get married, you will prefer being unmarried, and that if you stay unmarried, you will prefer being married. The general problem is to find a stable standard of well-being when the standard is set by preferences that are not stable. In this paper, I shall show that the (...)
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  30. Paul Calcott (2000). New on Paternalism. Economics and Philosophy 16 (2):315-321.
    Individuals often seem to misjudge their own interests. One reason is inadequate information. Other reasons are failures of reasoning and volition. These reasons have all been construed as paternalist motives for the state to intervene. But in a recent article in this journal, New (1999), criticizes earlier accounts of paternalism. He argues that imperfect information constitutes a standard form of market failure, and consequently policies that respond to it do not require a paternalist motivation. The purpose of this note is (...)
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  31. Bryan Caplan (2004). Is Socialism Really “Impossible”? Critical Review 16 (1):33-52.
    Abstract In the 1920s, Austrian?school economists began to argue that in a fully socialized economy, free of competitively generated prices, central planners would have no way to calculate which methods of production would be the most economical. They claimed that this ?economic calculation problem? showed that socialism is ?impossible.? Although many believe that the Austrian position was later vindicated by the collapse of the Soviet bloc, the Austrian school's own methodology disallows such a conclusion. And historical evidence suggests that poor (...)
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  32. Benjamin N. Cardozo (1930). The Paradoxes of Legal Sciences. New York, Columbia University Press.
    Introduction. Rest and motion. Stability and progress.--The meaning of justice. The science of values.--The equilibration of interests. Cause and effect. The individual and society. Liberty and government.--Liberty and government. Conclusion.
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  33. Ian Carter (1995). Interpersonal Comparisons of Freedom. Economics and Philosophy 11 (01):1-.
  34. Ian Carter & Matthew H. Kramer (2008). How Changes in One's Preferences Can Affect One's Freedom (and How They Cannot): A Reply to Dowding and Van Hees. Economics and Philosophy 24 (1):81-96.
  35. Christine Clavien & Michel Chapuisat (2013). Altruism Across Disciplines: One Word, Multiple Meanings. Biology and Philosophy 28 (1):125-140.
    Altruism is a deep and complex phenomenon that is analysed by scholars of various disciplines, including psychology, philosophy, biology, evolutionary anthropology and experimental economics. Much confusion arises in current literature because the term altruism covers variable concepts and processes across disciplines. Here we investigate the sense given to altruism when used in different fields and argumentative contexts. We argue that four distinct but related concepts need to be distinguished: (a) psychological altruism , the genuine motivation to improve others’ interests and (...)
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  36. Christine Clavien, Colby Tanner, Fabrice Clément & Michel Chapuisat (2012). Choosy Moral Punishers. Plos One.
    The punishment of social misconduct is a powerful mechanism for stabilizing high levels of cooperation among unrelated individuals. It is regularly assumed that humans have a universal disposition to punish social norm violators, which is sometimes labelled “universal structure of human morality” or “pure aversion to social betrayal”. Here we present evidence that, contrary to this hypothesis, the propensity to punish a moral norm violator varies among participants with different career trajectories. In anonymous real-life conditions, future teachers punished a talented (...)
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  37. Flavio Comim & Miriam Teschl (2006). Introduction: Capabilities and Identity. Journal of Economic Methodology 13 (3):293-298.
  38. Tyler Cowen (2002). Prelude to Political Economy, Kaushik Basu. Cambridge University Press, 2000, XV + 288 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 18 (1):183-204.
  39. Norman Daniels (1998). Symposium on the Rationing of Health Care: 2 Rationing Medical Care — A Philosopher's Perspective on Outcomes and Process. Economics and Philosophy 14 (01):27-.
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  40. Speranta Dumitru (2012). Migration and Equality: Should Citizenship Levy Be a Tax or a Fine? Les Ateliers de l'Éthique / the Ethics Forum 7 (2):34-49.
    It is often argued that development aid can and should compensate the restrictions on migration. Such compensation, Shachar has recently argued, should be levied as a tax on citizenship to further the global equality of opportunity. Since citizenship is essentially a ‘birthright lottery’, that is, a way of legalizing privileges obtained by birth, it would be fair to compensate the resulting gap in opportunities available to children born in rich versus poor countries by a ‘birthright privilege levy’. This article sets (...)
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  41. Horace L. Fairlamb (1996). Adam Smith's Other Hand: A Capitalist Theory of Exploitation. Social Theory and Practice 22 (2):193--223.
    Though Adam Smith believed that the spontaneous forces of the market set prices at the most productive level, he doubted that market forces price wages as fairly as the prices of other commodities. In fact, various observations by Smith suggest that the market tends to undervalue wages almost as naturally as it naturalizes the prices of most commodities under nonmonopolistic conditions. Those observations imply the germ of a capitalist theory of exploitation.
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  42. Danny Frederick (2010). A Competitive Market in Human Organs. Libertarian Papers 2 (27):1-21.
    I offer consequentialist and deontological arguments for a competitive market in human organs, from live as well as dead donors. I consider the objections that a market in organs will frustrate altruism, coerce the desperate, expose under-informed agents to unacceptable risks, exacerbate inequality, degrade those who participate in it, involve a kind of slavery, impose invidious costs, and impair third-party choice sets. I show that each of these objections is without merit and that, in consequence, the opposition to markets in (...)
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  43. Giuseppe Freni & Neri Salvadori (1996). Property and Prices. Toward a Unified Theory of Value, André Burgstaller. Cambridge University Press, 1994, Xi + 242 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 12 (02):240-.
  44. Daniel Friedman (2008). Morals and Markets: An Evolutionary Account of the Modern World. Palgrave Macmillan.
    Economist and evolutionary game theorist Daniel Friedman demonstrates that our moral codes and our market systems-while often in conflict-are really devices evolved to achieve similar ends, and that society functions best when morals and markets are in balance with each other.
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  45. David D. Friedman (1994). Law as a Private Good: A Response to Tyler Cowen on the Economics of Anarchy. Economics and Philosophy 10 (02):319-.
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  46. Norman Frohlich (1990). Social Contract, Free Ride: A Study of the Public Goods Problem, Anthony De Jassay. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1989, Vi + 256 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 6 (02):327-.
  47. Joseph S. Fulda (1999). In Defense of Charity and Philanthropy. Business and Society Review 104 (2):179-189.
    The article distinguishes between charity and philanthropy and answers those who argue that monies spent for either are an inefficient deployment of monies for present consumption that could better be deployed by investing in the production of future wealth. It closes by arguing that philanthropists provide a key leadership role in the free-market economy. -/- The author owns the copyright, and there was no agreement, express or implied, not to use the publisher's PDF.
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  48. Daniel Gay (2007). Modernism, Reflexivity and the Washington Consensus. Journal of Economic Methodology 14 (1):83-105.
    This paper develops a taxonomy of reflexive development practice, suggesting an examination of external values and norms; an assessment of the importance of local context; a recognition that policies can worsen the problems that they try to solve; and the idea that theory and policy should be revised as circumstances change. The taxonomy is developed as a way of addressing the difficulties encountered by the modernist Washington Consensus on the one hand and postmodernism on the other. The discussion draws on (...)
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  49. Ernest Gellner (1979). Spectacles & Predicaments: Essays in Social Theory. Cambridge University Press.
  50. Dipak Ghosh (2007). The Metamorphosis of Lewis's Dual Economy Model. Journal of Economic Methodology 14 (1):5-25.
    This paper argues that Arthur Lewis originally presented the problem of economic development in terms of an open system, in the sense that it focused on a number of possible pitfalls and socio?economic constraints in the process of capital accumulation and industrialization in a labour?surplus economy. In the hands of the neoclassical economists, who were predominantly interested in achieving deterministic equilibrium results by introducing strict assumptions, the theoretical system later became closed ? something Lewis never intended. JEL Classifications: B41, O10, (...)
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