This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories
Siblings:
142 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Sort by:
1 — 50 / 142
  1. David Z. Albert (1992). Bohr's Response to Einstein, Podolsky, and Rosen. In Edna Ullmann-Margalit (ed.), The Scientific Enterprise. Kluwer. 269--272.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Valia Allori (2013). Review of "Do We Really Understand Quantum Mechanics?" by Franck Laloë. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Review.
  3. Anton Amann (1993). The Gestalt Problem in Quantum Theory: Generation of Molecular Shape by the Environment. [REVIEW] Synthese 97 (1):125 - 156.
    Quantum systems have a holistic structure, which implies that they cannot be divided into parts. In order tocreate (sub)objects like individual substances, molecules, nuclei, etc., in a universal whole, the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen correlations between all the subentities, e.g. all the molecules in a substance, must be suppressed by perceptual and mental processes.Here the particular problems ofGestalt (shape)perception are compared with the attempts toattribute a shape to a quantum mechanical system like a molecule. Gestalt perception and quantum mechanics turn out (on an (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. D. Bar (2000). The Zeno Effect in the EPR Paradox, in the Teleportation Process, and in Wheeler's Delayed-Choice Experiment. Foundations of Physics 30 (6):813-838.
    We treat here three apparently uncorrelated topics from the point of view of dense measurement: The EPR paradox, the teleportation process, and Wheeler's delayed-choice experiment (DCE). We begin with the DCE and show, using its unique nature and the histories formalism, that use may ascertain and fix the notion of dense measurement (the Zeno effect). We show here by including the experimenter (observer) as an inherent part of the physical system and using the Aharonov–Vardi notion of dense measurement along a (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Olivier Costa De Beauregard (1990). Relativité et quanta : leurs mutuelles exigences, et les corrélations d'Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen. Revue de Métaphysique et de Morale 95 (4):547 - 559.
    A la différence de plusieurs interprétations de la mécanique quantique basées sur la phénoménologie de l'expérimentation macroscopique, celle-ci repose exclusivement sur le formalisme de la mécanique quantique relativiste lui-même. On y assimile le concept de causalité à celui d'une probabilité conditionnelle ayant deux traits spécifiques : « non-séparabilité » des occurrences au sens du calcul quantique des probabilités (Jordan, 1926) ; invariance sous les rotations (Lorentz et Poincaré, 1905) et les retournements d'axes (Lüders, 1952) du référentiel spatio-temporel cartésien, impliquant une (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Olivier Costa De Beauregard (1983). Les corrélations d'Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen et la causalité sans flèche passé-futur. Revue de Métaphysique et de Morale 88 (1):101 - 114.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Herbert J. Bernstein (1999). Simple Version of the Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) Argument Against Local Realism. Foundations of Physics 29 (4):521-525.
    Here is a simple, clear, useful proof that quantum mechanics contradicts Einstein, Podolsky, and Rosen's local realistic assumptions. It is a variant of the powerful argument first worked out by Daniel Mordechai Greenberger, Michael A. Horne, and Anton Zeilinger. This version uses the eigenstates of two orthogonal spin components for three spin-1/2 particles. No operator or matrix algebra is necessary. A novel discussion of the background and history serves to introduce this proof and to place it in the context of (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. R. A. Bertlmann (1990). Bell's Theorem and the Nature of Reality. Foundations of Physics 20 (10):1191-1212.
    We rediscuss the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen paradox in Bohm's spin version and oppose to it Bohr's controversial point of view. Then we explain Bell's theorem, Bell inequalities, and its consequences. We describe the experiment of Aspect, Dalibard, and Roger in detail. Finally we draw attention to the nonlocal structure of the underlying theory.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. S. V. Bhave (1986). Separable Hidden Variables Theory to Explain Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen Paradox. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 37 (4):467-475.
    A realist separable hidden variables theory in conformity with Einstein's principle of causality is developed in this paper to explain the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen paradox, and the experimental results (including those in Aspect's four polarizers experiment) obtained so far with a view to test the non-separability of quantum mechanics.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Tomasz Bigaj (2006). Non-Locality and Possible Worlds. A Counterfactual Perspective on Quantum Entanglement. Ontos Verlag.
    This book uses the formal semantics of counterfactual conditionals to analyze the problem of non-locality in quantum mechanics. Counterfactual conditionals enter the analysis of quantum entangled systems in that they enable us to precisely formulate the locality condition that purports to exclude the existence of causal interactions between spatially separated parts of a system. They also make it possible to speak consistently about alternative measuring settings, and to explicate what is meant by quantum property attributions. The book develops the possible-world (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Gilles Brassard & André Allan Méthot (2010). Can Quantum-Mechanical Description of Physical Reality Be Considered Correct? Foundations of Physics 40 (4):463-468.
    In an earlier paper written in loving memory of Asher Peres, we gave a critical analysis of the celebrated 1935 paper in which Einstein, Podolsky and Rosen (EPR) challenged the completeness of quantum mechanics. There, we had pointed out logical shortcomings in the EPR paper. Now, we raise additional questions concerning their suggested program to find a theory that would “provide a complete description of the physical reality”. In particular, we investigate the extent to which the EPR argumentation could have (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Matthew J. Brown (2014). Quantum Frames. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 45 (1):1-10.
    The framework of quantum frames can help unravel some of the interpretive difficulties i the foundation of quantum mechanics. In this paper, I begin by tracing the origins of this concept in Bohr's discussion of quantum theory and his theory of complementarity. Engaging with various interpreters and followers of Bohr, I argue that the correct account of quantum frames must be extended beyond literal space–time reference frames to frames defined by relations between a quantum system and the exosystem or external (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Jeffrey Bub (2001). The Quantum Bit Commitment Theorem. Foundations of Physics 31 (5):735-756.
    Unconditionally secure two-party bit commitment based solely on the principles of quantum mechanics (without exploiting special relativistic signalling constraints, or principles of general relativity or thermodynamics) has been shown to be impossible, but the claim is repeatedly challenged. The quantum bit commitment theorem is reviewed here and the central conceptual point, that an “Einstein–Podolsky–Rosen” attack or cheating strategy can always be applied, is clarified. The question of whether following such a cheating strategy can ever be disadvantageous to the cheater is (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Jeffrey Bub (1991). The Problem of Properties in Quantum Mechanics. Topoi 10 (1):27-34.
    The properties of classical and quantum systems are characterized by different algebraic structures. We know that the properties of a quantum mechanical system form a partial Boolean algebra not embeddable into a Boolean algebra, and so cannot all be co-determinate. We also know that maximal Boolean subalgebras of properties can be (separately) co-determinate. Are there larger subsets of properties that can be co-determinate without contradiction? Following an analysis of Bohrs response to the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen objection to the complementarity interpretation of quantum (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Jeffrey Bub (1990). On Bohr's Response to EPR: II. [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 20 (8):929-941.
    In my reconstruction of Bohr's reply to the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen argument, I pointed out that Bohr showed explicitly, within the framework of the complementarity interpretation, how a locally maximal measurement on a subsystem S2 of a composite system S1+S2, consisting of two spatially separated subsystems, can make determinate both a locally maximal Boolean subalgebra for S2 and a locally maximal Boolean subalgebra for S1. As it stands, this response is open to an objection. In this note, I show that meeting the (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Jeffrey Bub (1989). On Bohr's Response to EPR: A Quantum Logical Analysis. [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 19 (7):793-805.
    Bohr's complementarity interpretation is represented as the relativization of the quantum mechanical description of a system to the maximal Boolean subalgebra (in the non-Boolean logical structure of the system) selected by a classically described experimental arrangement. Only propositions in this subalgebra have determinate truth values. The concept of a minimal revision of a Boolean subalgebra by a measurement is defined, and it is shown that the nonmaximal measurement of spin on one subsystem in the spin version of the Einstein—Podolsky—Rosen experiment (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Jeremy Butterfield, Quantum Chance and Non-Locality.
    This is an excellent book, by one of the philosophy of quantum theory's brightest stars. It combines a clear presentation of determinism, probability and non-locality in several current interpretations of quantum theory, with a good deal of detailed analysis, both reporting other people's and Dickson's own results, and developing his own ideas|which are often heterodox, but always well-defended and thought-provoking. The treatment is often concise, especially when reporting standard material or others' results. There are also frequent changes of gear; both (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Jeremy Butterfield (2001). Book Review:Quantum Chance and Non-Locality: Probablity and Non-Locality in the Interpretations of Quantum Mechanics W. Michael Dickson. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 68 (2):263-.
  19. J. Cachro & Tomasz Placek (2002). On Cartwright's Models for EPR. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 33 (3):413-433.
    We assess Cartwright's models for probabilistic causality and, in particular, her models for EPR-like experiments of quantum mechanics. Our first objection is that, contrary to econometric linear models, her quasi-linear models do not allow for the unique estimation of parameters. We next argue that although, as Cartwright proves, Reichenbach's screening-off condition has only limited validity, her generalized condition is not empirically applicable. Finally, we show that her models for the EPR are mathematically incorrect and physically implausible.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Hasok Chang & Nancy Cartwright (1993). Causality and Realism in the EPR Experiment. Erkenntnis 38 (2):169 - 190.
    We argue against the common view that it is impossible to give a causal account of the distant correlations that are revealed in EPR-type experiments. We take a realistic attitude about quantum mechanics which implies a willingness to modify our familiar concepts according to its teachings. We object to the argument that the violation of factorizability in EPR rules out causal accounts, since such an argument is at best based on the desire to retain a classical description of nature that (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Oscar Chavoya-Aceves, Logical Refutation of the EPR Argument.
    On the grounds that the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen argument is an example of reasoning by reductio ad absurdum, and that a counterexample is unacceptable, unless all its elements meet all the necessary conditions, its conclusions are invalidated. The arguments in this paper are strictly logical. Einstein, Podolsky and Rosen made a mathematical assumption that is incompatible with quantum mechanics.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Wim Christiaens (2004). The EPR-Experiment and Free Process Theory. Axiomathes 14 (1-3):267-283.
    As part of the creation-discovery interpretation of quantum mechanics Diederik Aerts presented a setting with macroscopical coincidence experiments designed to exhibit significant conceptual analogies between portions of stuff and quantum compound entities in a singlet state in Einstein—Podolsky—Rosen/Bell-experiments (EPR-experiments). One important claim of the creation-discovery view is that the singlet state describes an entity that does not have a definite position in space and thus does not exist in space. Free Process Theory is a recent proposal by Johanna Seibt of (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. O. Cohen & B. J. Hiley (1995). Retrodiction in Quantum Mechanics, Preferred Lorentz Frames, and Nonlocal Measurements. Foundations of Physics 25 (12):1669-1698.
    We examine, in the context of the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen-Bohm gedankenexperiment, problems associated with state reduction and with nonlocal influences according to different interpretations of quantum mechanics, when attempts are made to apply these interpretations in the relativistic domain. We begin by considering the significance of retrodiction within four different interpretations of quantum mechanics, and show that three of these interpretations, if applied in a relativistic context, can lead to ambiguities in their description of a process. We consider ways of dealing with (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Marie-Christine Combourieu (1992). Karl R. Popper, 1992: About the EPR Controversy. [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 22 (10):1303-1323.
    Sir K. R. Popper's experimental schemes challenge the Copenhagen interpretation of quantum theory, principally Heisenberg's indeterminacy relations and the EPR paradox. “The so-called Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen paradox is not a paradox. It is a theoretical statement in expectation of an interpretation,” says K. R. Popper in this interview. “My experiment ought to be a classical experiment. It is very simple and free from any additional assumption. It should really be done.”.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Marie‐Christine Combourieu (1995). Controverse autour de la définition de la réalité physique. Le paradoxe d'Einstein‐Podolsky‐Rosen (1935) et la non‐séparabilité quantique. Dialectica 49 (1):47-74.
    RésuméSoixante‐cinq ans après sa publication, la controverse que l'article #Einstein, Podolsky et Rosen suscita à propos de I'image de l'univers physique suggérée par le formalisme de la théorié quantique n'est pas close. Elle oppose une minorité«localiste», petit cercle de physiciens réalistes partisans de la localitéd’ Einstein, á une majorité«non localisten» adepte – non uniformément, cependant – des prédictions non locales de la thhrie quantique et de l'Interprétation dite positiviste de Copenhague érigée principalement sur la philosophie de Bohr et de Heisenberg.Les (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Mc Combourieu (1995). Controversy Regarding the Definition of Physical Reality, the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen Paradox and Quantum Nonseparability. Dialectica 49 (1):47-73.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. John Cramer, EPR Communication: Signals From the Future?
    Last June I was an invited speaker at the symposium “Frontiers of Time: Reverse Causation—Experiment and Theory,” part of a meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) held on the beautiful campus of the University of San Diego. (Here, reverse causation means a violation of that most mysterious law of physics, the Principle of Causality, which requires that any cause must precede its effects in all reference frames.) I had originally intended to just talk about my (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. N. Cufaro-Petroni, C. Dewdney, P. R. Holland, A. Kyprianidis & J. P. Vigier (1987). Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen Constraints on Quantum Action at a Distance: The Sutherland Paradox. [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 17 (8):759-773.
    Assuming that future experiments confirm Aspect's discovery of nonlocal interactions between quantum pairs of correlated particles, we analyze the constraints imposed by the EPR reasoning on the said interactions. It is then shown that the nonlocal relativistic quantum potential approach plainly satisfies the Einstein causality criteria as well as the energy-momentum conservation in individual microprocesses. Furthermore, this approach bypasses a new causal paradox for timelike separated EPR measurements deduced by Sutherland in the frame of an approach by means of space-time (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Ratan Dasgupta & Sisir Roy (2008). Multinomial Distribution, Quantum Statistics and Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen Like Phenomena. Foundations of Physics 38 (4):384-394.
    Bose-Einstein statistics may be characterized in terms of multinomial distribution. From this characterization, an information theoretic analysis is made for Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen like situation; using Shannon’s measure of entropy.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. O. Costa de Beauregard (1985). On Some Frequent but Controversial Statements Concerning the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen Correlations. Foundations of Physics 15 (8):871-887.
    Quite often the compatibility of the EPR correlations with the relativity theory has been questioned; it has been stated that “the first in time of two correlated measurements instantaneously collapses the other subsystem”; it has been suggested that a causal asymmetry is built into the Feynman propagator. However, the EPR transition amplitude, as derived from the S matrix, is Lorentz andCPT invariant; the correlation formula is symmetric in the two measurements irrespective of their time ordering, so that the link of (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. O. Costa De Beauregard (1979). Le paradoxe d'Einstein ou d'Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen. Logique Et Analyse 22 (88):425.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Olivier Costa de Beauregard (1953). Méchanique quantique. Comptes Rendus Académie des Sciences 236 (1632).
  33. Willem M. De Muynck (1986). On the Relation Between the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen Paradox and the Problem of Nonlocality in Quantum Mechanics. Foundations of Physics 16 (10):973-1002.
    The EPR problem is studied both from an instrumentalistic and from a realistic point of view. Bohr's reply to the EPR paper is analyzed and demonstrated to be not completely representative of Bohr's general views on the possibility of defining properties of a microscopic object. A more faithful Bohrian answer would not have led Einstein to the conclusion that Bohr's completeness claim of quantum mechanics implies nonlocality. The projection postulate, already denounced in 1936 by Margenau as the source of the (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Robert Deltete & Reed Guy (1991). Einstein and EPR. Philosophy of Science 58 (3):377-397.
    Recent studies have shown that Einstein did not write the EPR paper and that he was disappointed with the outcome. He thought, rightly, that his own argument for the incompleteness of quantum theory was badly presented in the paper. We reconstruct the argument of EPR, indicate the reasons Einstein was dissatisfied with it, and discuss Einstein's own argument. We show that many commentators have been misled by the obscurity of EPR into proposing interpretations of its argument that do not accurately (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Jean-Louis Destouches (1979). Confrontation entre réalisme et positivisme a propos du paradoxe d'Einstein - Podolsky - Rosen. Logique Et Analyse 22 (88):381.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. C. Dewdney (1988). Nonlocally Correlated Trajectories in Two-Particle Quantum Mechanics. Foundations of Physics 18 (9):867-886.
    In this paper we present a series of computer calculations carried out in order to demonstrate exactly how the de Broglie-Bohm interpretation works for two-particle quantum mechanics. In particular, we show how the de Broglie-Bohm interpretation can account for the essential features of nonrelativistic, two-particle quantum mechanics in terms of well-defined, correlated, individual particle trajectories and spin vectors. We demonstrate exactly how both quantum statistics and the correlations observed in Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen experiments can be explained in terms of nonlocal quantum potentials (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Michael Dickson (2007). Review of Tomasz F. Bigaj, Non-Locality and Possible Worlds: A Counterfactual Perspective on Quantum Entanglement. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2007 (7).
  38. Michael Dickson (1997). Book Review:Quantum Non-Locality and Relativity: Metaphysical Intimations of Modern Physics Tim Maudlin. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 64 (3):516-.
  39. William Michael Dickson (1998). Quantum Chance and Non-Locality: Probability and Non-Locality in the Interpretations of Quantum Mechanics. Cambridge University Press.
    This book examines in detail two of the fundamental questions raised by quantum mechanics. First, is the world indeterministic? Second, are there connections between spatially separated objects? In the first part, the author examines several interpretations, focusing on how each proposes to solve the measurement problem and on how each treats probability. In the second part, the relationship between probability (specifically determinism and indeterminism) and non-locality is examined, and it is argued that there is a non-trivial relationship between probability and (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Dennis Dieks (2003). Book Review: Foundations of Quantum Mechanics, an Empiricist Approach. By Willem M. De Muynck. Kluwer Academic Publishers, Dordrecht/Boston/London, 2002, Xxiv+680 Pp., $219.00 (Hardcover). ISBN 1-4020-0932-1. [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 33 (6):1003-1006.
  41. László E. Szabó, The Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen Argument and the Bell Inequalities.
    In 1935 Einstein, Podolsky, and Rosen (EPR) published an important paper in which they claimed that the whole formalism of quantum mechanics together with what they called ``Reality Criterion'' imply that quantum mechanics cannot be complete. That is, there must exist some elements of reality that are not described by quantum mechanics. There must be, they concluded, a more complete description of physical reality behind quantum mechanics. There must be a state, a hidden variable, characterizing the state of affairs in (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Albert Einstein, Boris Podolsky & Nathan Rosen (1935). Can Quantum-Mechanical Description of Physical Reality Be Considered Complete? Physical Review (47):777-780.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Andrew Elby, Harvey R. Brown & Sara Foster (1993). What Makes a Theory Physically “Complete”? Foundations of Physics 23 (7):971-985.
    Three claims about what makes a theory “physically complete” are (1) Shimony's assertion that a complete theory says “all there is to say” about nature; (2) EPR's requirement that a complete theory describe all “elements of reality”; and (3) Ballentine and Jarrett's claim that a “predictively complete” theory must obey a condition used in Bell deviations. After introducing “statistical completeness” as a partial formalization of (1), we explore the logical and motivational relationships connecting these completeness conditions. We find that statistical (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Herman Erlichson (1972). The Einstein-Podolski-Rosen Paradox. Philosophy of Science 39 (1):83-85.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. P. W. Evans, H. Price & K. B. Wharton (2013). New Slant on the EPR-Bell Experiment. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 64 (2):297-324.
    The best case for thinking that quantum mechanics is nonlocal rests on Bell's Theorem, and later results of the same kind. However, the correlations characteristic of Einstein–Podolsky–Rosen (EPR)–Bell (EPRB) experiments also arise in familiar cases elsewhere in quantum mechanics (QM), where the two measurements involved are timelike rather than spacelike separated; and in which the correlations are usually assumed to have a local causal explanation, requiring no action-at-a-distance (AAD). It is interesting to ask how this is possible, in the light (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. J. Barretto Bastos Filho & F. Selleri (1995). Propensity, Probability, and Quantum Physics. Foundations of Physics 25 (5):701-716.
    Popper's idea of propensities constituting the physical background of predictable probabilities is reviewed and developed by introducing a suitable formalism compatible with standard probability calculus and with its frequency interpretation. Quantum statistical ensembles described as pure cases (“eigenstates”) are shown to be necessarily not homogeneous if propensities are actually at work in nature. An extension of the theory to EPR experiments with local propensities leads to a new and more general proof of Bell's theorem. No joint probabilities for incompatible observables (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Arthur Fine, The Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen Argument in Quantum Theory. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    In the May 15, 1935 issue of Physical Review Albert Einstein co-authored a paper with his two postdoctoral research associates at the Institute for Advanced Study, Boris Podolsky and Nathan Rosen. The article was entitled “Can Quantum Mechanical Description of Physical Reality Be Considered Complete?” (Einstein et al. 1935). Generally referred to as “EPR”, this paper quickly became a centerpiece in the debate over the interpretation of the quantum theory, a debate that continues today. The paper features a striking case (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Robert G. Flower, Conference on the Foundations of Quantum Mechanics.
    Enormous and significant progress has been made in the important areas of entanglement, quantum computing and harnessing energy from the vacuum, which includes a sound theoretical basis, using the Einstein-Sachs theories to develop an anti-symmetric general relativity (AGR) approach to a higher topology O(3) electrodynamics. These developments also lead to the application of the Aharonov-Bohm effect and the Yang-Mills theory to the higher topology O(3) electrodynamics, as well as a deeper understanding and appreciation of these effects and their impact on (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Bas C. Fraassen (1974). The Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen Paradox. Synthese 29 (1-4):291 - 309.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. N. G. (1995). Examining the Compatibility of Special Relativity and Quantum Theory. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 26 (3):325-331.
1 — 50 / 142